Thursday March 21, 2019

Mild Sleep Problems May up Blood Pressure in Women

The researchers also found an association between endothelial inflammation and mild sleep disturbances

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Night time
Night-time beauty regime to follow. Pixabay

Women, please take note. Even if you are having mild sleep problems, such as having trouble falling asleep, it can raise your blood pressure, a new study suggests.

The study found that women who had mild sleep problems — including those who slept for seven to nine hours a night, as measured by a wristwatch-like device — were significantly more likely to have elevated blood pressure.

The researchers also found an association between endothelial inflammation and mild sleep disturbances.

“Our findings suggest that mild sleep problems could possibly initiate the vascular endothelial inflammation that’s a significant contributor to cardiovascular disease,” said lead author Brooke Aggarwal from the Columbia University Irving Medical Center.

Blood pressure
Representational image.

According to the researchers, nearly one-third of adults don’t get enough sleep and for women, the problem may be even bigger.

“That’s concerning, since studies have shown that sleep deprivation and milder sleep problems may have a disproportionate effect on cardiovascular health in women,” Aggarwal added.

For the study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the researchers examined blood pressure and sleep habits in 323 healthy women.

Also Read: Detoxify, Sleep Well For Radiant Skin

Mild sleep disturbances — poor-quality sleep, taking longer to fall asleep, and insomnia — were nearly three times more common than severe sleep disturbances, such as obstructive sleep apnea.

Some of the women allowed the researchers to extract a few endothelial cells from inside an arm vein to look for a pro-inflammatory protein that is implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease. (IANS)

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Sweetened Beverages May Increase Risk of Early Death: Study

Sugar-sweetened beverages intake is also on the rise in developing countries, spurred by urbanisation and beverage marketing

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soda
The "soft drinks" were defined as caffeinated colas, caffeine-free colas and other carbonated beverages (such as diet ginger ale). Pixabay

Women who drink sugar sweetened beverages are at an increased risk of death from cardiovascular diseases, researchers have warned.

The study, led by Harvard University researchers, found that drinking 1-4 sugary drinks per month was linked with a one per cent increased risk of death and 2-6 drinks per week with a six per cent increase.

The increased early death risk linked with sugar-sweetened beverages consumption was more pronounced among women than among men, the findings, published in the journal Circulation, showed.

“Our results provide further support to limit intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and to replace them with other beverages, preferably water, to improve overall health and longevity,” said lead author Vasanti Malik.

However, drinking one artificially-sweetened beverage per day instead of carbonated and non-carbonated soft drinks, fruit drinks, energy drinks, and sports drinks lowered the risk of premature death.

One should go for healthier alternatives of cold drinks. Wikimedia Commons
One should go for healthier alternatives of cold drinks. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, the team analysed data from 80,647 women and 37,716 men.

The study supports policies to limit marketing of sugary beverages to children and adolescents and for implementing soda taxes.

Also Read- Strength Training Can Help in Reducing Fatty Liver Disease, Says Study

Sugar-sweetened beverages should be no more than 10 per cent of daily calories from added sugars.

Sugar-sweetened beverages intake is also on the rise in developing countries, spurred by urbanisation and beverage marketing, said the team. (IANS)