Thursday January 17, 2019

Having Milk in Breakfast Helps in Managing The Risk of Diabetes

This study confirms the importance of milk at breakfast time to aid in the slower digestion of carbohydrate and to help maintain lower blood sugar levels

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Milk
Drinking milk at breakfast might help manage diabetes. Pixabay

If you are diabetic, then consuming milk at breakfast can help lower blood glucose level throughout the day, suggests a study.

The findings showed that milk consumed with a high-carbohydrate breakfast reduced blood glucose even after lunch, and high-protein milk had a greater effect.

Milk with an increased proportion of whey protein had a modest effect on pre-lunch blood glucose, achieving a greater decrease than that provided by regular milk.

The high-protein treatment also reduced appetite after the second meal compared with the low-protein equivalent.

“Metabolic diseases are on the rise globally, with type-2 diabetes and obesity as leading concerns in human health,” said Professor Douglas Goff, from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Thus, there is impetus to develop dietary strategies for the risk reduction and management of obesity and diabetes to empower consumers to improve their personal health,” he added.

For the study, published in the Journal of Dairy Science, the team included over 100 persons to examine the effects of increasing protein concentration and increasing the proportion of whey protein in milk consumed with a high-carbohydrate breakfast cereal on blood glucose, feelings of satiety, and food consumption later in the day.

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Although the team only found a modest difference in food consumption at the lunch meal when increasing whey protein at breakfast, they found that milk consumed with breakfast cereal reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with water, and high dairy protein concentration reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with normal dairy protein concentration.

“This study confirms the importance of milk at breakfast time to aid in the slower digestion of carbohydrate and to help maintain lower blood sugar levels. Nutritionists have always stressed the importance of a healthy breakfast, and this study should encourage consumers to include milk,” Goff said. (IANS)

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Eating An Egg Daily May Keep Diabetes At Bay

In addition, the researchers identified several biochemical compounds in blood that predicted a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes, including the amino acid tyrosine

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Reason Why Middle-Aged Men Should Limit Their Protein Intake
An egg a day may keep diabetes away.

Eating an egg daily can have a beneficial effect on the blood metabolite profile that is related to a lower risk of Type-2 diabetes, a new study shows.

The findings showed that the blood samples of men who ate more eggs included certain lipid molecules that positively correlated with the blood profile of men who remained free of Type-2 diabetes.

“The study explored potential compounds that could explain this association using non-targeted metabolomics, a technique that enables a broad profiling of chemicals in a sample,” said lead author Stefania Noerman from the University of Eastern Finland.

Eggs remain one of the most controversial food items.High intake of eggs has traditionally been discouraged, mainly due to their high cholesterol content.

However, eggs are also a rich source of many bioactive compounds that can have beneficial effects on health. This means that the health effects of consuming eggs are difficult to determine based solely on their cholesterol content, the researchers said.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, 239 serum samples were analysed in four groups: men with higher (mean intake one egg per day) or lower (mean intake two eggs per week) egg intake who developed Type-2 diabetes (cases) or remained healthy (controls) during the mean follow-up of nearly 20 years.

The study suggested some plausible mechanisms which could at least partly explain the inverse association between egg intake and the previously observed lower risk of developing Type-2 diabetes.

Also Read- Protein Found in Spinach May Treat Alcohol Abuse, Mood Disorders

In addition, the researchers identified several biochemical compounds in blood that predicted a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes, including the amino acid tyrosine.

“Although it is too early to draw any causal conclusions, we now have some hints about certain egg-related compounds that may have a role in Type-2 diabetes development.

“Further detailed investigations with both cell models and intervention studies in humans that use modern techniques, such as metabolomics, are needed to understand the mechanisms behind physiological effects of egg intake,” Noerman noted. (IANS)