Tuesday June 25, 2019

Fortification of Milk, a Viable Strategy to Fight Malnutrition

Rath said about two billion people globally suffer from micronutrient deficiencies accounting for nearly 10 per cent of the global health burden

0
//
Milk, Vehicle, Fortification
38.4 per cent of children five years of age in India are stunted. Pixabay

The Milk Fortification project, a joint initiative of World Bank, Tata Trusts and National Dairy Development Board (NDDB), aims to process about two million tonnes of fortified liquid milk during the next 23 months to reach 30 million consumers as a strategy to tackle malnutrition.

Inaugurating an awarness workshop on ‘Sustaining Efforts of Milk Production in India’ on Friday, National Dairy Development Board Chairman Dilip Rath said Vitamin A and D deficiencies were widely prevalent in India.

“Fortification of appropriate foods with Vitamin A and D is a viable strategy to tackle micronutrient malnutrition,” he added.

Rath said about two billion people globally suffer from micronutrient deficiencies accounting for nearly 10 per cent of the global health burden.

Milk, Vehicle, Fortification
The Milk Fortification project, a joint initiative of World Bank, Tata Trusts and National Dairy Development Board. Pixabay

According to 2009 reports of the World Health Organisation (WHO) and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), India bears the burden of more than a quarter of the world’s Vitamin A deficient preschool children and more than 13 million susceptible infants to iodine deficiency.

According to National Family Health Survey-4 data, 38.4 per cent of children five years of age in India are stunted, 21 per cent wasted and 35.7 per cent are underweight.

“Milk in India has emerged as the best vehicle for fortification with its high volume of production, widespread distribution network, affordability and all around acceptability in the daily food habit,” Rath pointed out.

“We are world’s largest milk producing country and our per capita availability has now increased to 375 grams per day,” he added.

Also Read- Samsung Electronics Third in Global Race for AI-Related Patent

Moreover, milk fortification was highly affordable and cost effective as it cost less than 2 to 3 paisa per litre, Rathid Rath said.

NDDB is providing consultancy service to World Bank for the implementation of the milk fortification project as well as technical and financial support to the federations for project implementation, including development of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for fortification and testing, quality assurance and quality control for fortification, conducting fortification training building and developing promotion materials.

Rajan Sankar, Director, The India Nutrition Initiative (TINI), Edward W Bresnyan, Senior Agricultural Economist, World Bank, Madhusudan Rao, Nutrition Lead, Tata Trusts, Vivek Arora, Senior Advisor, Tata Trusts, Dr RK Marwaha, Member of scientific panel, FSSAI, Dr CS Pandav, Member, National Council for India’s Nutritional Challenges, Poshan Abhiyan, also participated in the workshop.

Milk, Vehicle, Fortification
Fortification of appropriate foods with Vitamin A and D is a viable strategy to tackle micronutrient malnutrition. Pixabay

The fortification is strictly carried out as per the SOPs developed by NDDB and FSSAI and the milk federations and producers have to regularly submit reports to the Board.

Also Read- Paytm Payments Bank Ahead of Major Banks in Digital Transaction Target

According to the NDDB Chairman, of the 25 project proposals approved, fortification has been launched in 15 milk federations and trials have completed in 10 others. About one million metric tonnes of milk has been fortified so far. (IANS)

Next Story

Having Milk in Breakfast Helps in Managing The Risk of Diabetes

This study confirms the importance of milk at breakfast time to aid in the slower digestion of carbohydrate and to help maintain lower blood sugar levels

0
Milk
Drinking milk at breakfast might help manage diabetes. Pixabay

If you are diabetic, then consuming milk at breakfast can help lower blood glucose level throughout the day, suggests a study.

The findings showed that milk consumed with a high-carbohydrate breakfast reduced blood glucose even after lunch, and high-protein milk had a greater effect.

Milk with an increased proportion of whey protein had a modest effect on pre-lunch blood glucose, achieving a greater decrease than that provided by regular milk.

The high-protein treatment also reduced appetite after the second meal compared with the low-protein equivalent.

“Metabolic diseases are on the rise globally, with type-2 diabetes and obesity as leading concerns in human health,” said Professor Douglas Goff, from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Thus, there is impetus to develop dietary strategies for the risk reduction and management of obesity and diabetes to empower consumers to improve their personal health,” he added.

For the study, published in the Journal of Dairy Science, the team included over 100 persons to examine the effects of increasing protein concentration and increasing the proportion of whey protein in milk consumed with a high-carbohydrate breakfast cereal on blood glucose, feelings of satiety, and food consumption later in the day.

Also Read- Punjab Gets Tech-Savy and Eco-friendly

Although the team only found a modest difference in food consumption at the lunch meal when increasing whey protein at breakfast, they found that milk consumed with breakfast cereal reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with water, and high dairy protein concentration reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with normal dairy protein concentration.

“This study confirms the importance of milk at breakfast time to aid in the slower digestion of carbohydrate and to help maintain lower blood sugar levels. Nutritionists have always stressed the importance of a healthy breakfast, and this study should encourage consumers to include milk,” Goff said. (IANS)