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Know Why Millennial Parents Are Better Than the Previous Generation

Millennial parents Smarter than their predecessors

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Millennial parents
A survey by US tech company Winnie suggests it is the millennial parents who make up for 90 per cent of all new parents, are evolved, smarter and given the information and internet era far more exposed compared to their own parents. Pixabay

BY PUJA GUPTA

Guess which is the most competent generation of parents when it comes to awareness? A survey by US tech company Winnie suggests it is the millennial parents who make up for 90 per cent of all new parents, are evolved, smarter and given the information and internet era far more exposed compared to their own parents.

Ambitious, well-educated and well-informed, millennial parents focus on the overall development and well-being of their children in a more conscious and aware style of holistic upbringing.

With more resources at hand, these parents are aware of what works and what does not. This holds to be most true when it comes to health concerns. Millennial parents are on top of what is good for their children’s health. Priyanka Kheruka, Brand Head, Borosil Glass Works Ltd, lists the top three health interventions most millennial parents are following today –

Millennial parents
Millennial parents are on top of what is good for their children’s health. Pixabay

Eco-friendly kitchens: For the millennial, the reverse trend of realising the health value of home cooked meals is an important aspect of their daily life. This, however, is juxtaposed against a lack of time with many more layers added to our modern lives including demanding careers and lifestyle.

Hence, the need for convenience and health driven kitchen solutions. What you cook and store your food in is an important as what you eat.

Millennial parents are moving away from plastics for storage replacing containers with the glass and steel. They are also cooking food in glass, steel and copper utensils. Millennial parents are aware of the harmful effects of plastic, which leaches chemicals into food when heated.

For kids and parents who are always on the move, even water bottles and lunch boxes are moving from traditional plastic to glass and steel with unique designs and health benefits, keeping food and water hot or cold and leaching absolutely no chemicals to preserve nutrition.

Mindfulness about food and healthy eating: Millennial parents will surprise you with their knowledge on what all goes into what they are feeding their children. Food habits of their children are constantly evolving with exposure to different cuisines and travel experiences enrich their overall choices. Healthy eating, preparing hot food vs frozen and including a mix of ingredients that one point seemed a foreign concept are now all part of the millennial diet.

Millennial parents
Millennial parents will surprise you with their knowledge on what all goes into what they are feeding their children. Pixabay

Health has gained a whole new dimension and is approached holistically keeping in mind the purest form food can be given to our children – organic, natural and fresh. Farm to table is a concept that is getting more popular among urban millennials who are often seen sourcing milk and organic vegetables directly from farm vendors. Retaining the freshness of these foods is also essential.

Active and hydrated: there is no replacement to the health of children than active play. Digital distractions have made this natural activity now a required deliberate intervention. Millennial parents are consciously, including sports and activity in their children’s lives.

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However, climate change and pollution has led to harsher weather conditions and hydration is also essential. Keeping our kids hydrated with water and healthy drinks like juice and lemon water are essential as we shrug sugar filled aerated options. Here again, using high quality food grade stainless steel bottles is the best solution. (IANS)

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Most People Become Vegetarian for a Healthy Lifestyle: Study

Most people think being vegetarian is for super health

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vegetarian
The most common reason people say they would consider being vegetarian has to do with health. Pixabay

What motivates nonvegetarians to follow a plant-based diet? Most people who consider becoming vegetarian do so for their health, say researchers, adding that, environment and animal rights was less motivational.

“The most common reason people say they would consider being vegetarian has to do with health,” said study co-author Christopher J Hopwood, Professor at the University of California, Davis in the US.

According to the researchers, eating is an important day to day behaviour at the interface of individual differences, social dynamics, economics, health, and ethics.

Vegetarianism has emerged as a significant dietary movement in Western cultures.For the findings, published in the journal PLOS ONE, the research team surveyed 8,000 people of various ages and ethnicities, in two languages, in both the US and Holland, to help determine why nonvegetarians decide to become vegetarian.

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Most people who consider becoming vegetarian do so for their health, say researchers, adding that, environment and animal rights was less motivational. Pixabay

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In this study, they developed the Vegetarian Eating Motives Inventory (VMI), a brief and psychometrically robust measure of the three main motives for adopting a plant-based diet: health, the environment, and animal rights.

The results showed that the main motivation for nonvegetarians to consider being vegetarian is health, with environmental and animal rights motives being less common. However, people who are most committed to a veg diet were most motivated by the environment or animal rights.

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The researchers found that health motives were associated with conventionality and masculinity, whereas people who cite environmental or animal rights motives tend to be curious, open to experience, likely to volunteer and interested in the arts.

“Based on these results, advocacy groups could target certain kinds of people — maybe advertise health benefits at a gym or church service, but environmental or animal rights perspectives at a museum or concert,” Hopwood said. (IANS)