Sunday February 17, 2019

Mindfulness works as good as antidepressants to prevent relapses of depression: Study

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Mindulness

By NewsGram Staff Writer

A new study has unveiled that practicing mindfulness works just as good as gulping down antidepressants to prevent relapses of depression.

Having its root in Buddhism, mindfulness includes paying attention on ‘the purpose.’ It is an emotionally non-reactive state, which helps people to refrain from tagging a situation good or bad.

A latest study published in ‘The Lancet’ revealed that practicing mindfulness is as effective as taking antidepressants to treat depression. The study also suggested that patients taking part in the mindfulness-based group therapy sessions were less likely to slide back into depression.

The sessions aimed at teaching mediation tricks along with ‘mindfulness principles’ with the goal of bolstering the patients to react differently to patterns of negative thinking that could give a way to depression to creep in slowly.

The study, conducted by researchers at Oxford University, followed 424 people from the South West of England for two years. Half of the people received mindfulness therapy whereas the other half continued taking antidepressants.

Surprisingly, the rate of depression relapse in the people who continuously practiced mindfulness was 44% compared to 47% among those who carried on with their medication.

“Recurrent depression is characterized by people who have very negative thoughts about themselves, other people and the world, and those negative thoughts can quickly go into a downward spiral of depressive relapse,” said Willem Kuyken, professor of clinical psychology at the University of Oxford and lead author of the study.

“Whilst this study doesn’t show that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy works any better than maintenance antidepressant medication in reducing the rate of relapse in depression, we believe these results suggest a new choice for the millions of people with recurrent depression on repeat prescriptions,” he added.

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Premature to Say Social Media Use Leads to Depression

Examining the role that these differences play will help clarify the ways in which social media interacts with mental health, with implications for parents, policymakers, and healthcare professionals alike, the study noted

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carbon, digital
Multiple apps are displayed on an iPhone in New York.. VOA

Use of social media does not necessarily cause depressive symptoms later in adolescents and young adults, according to a recent research.

The study, however, showed that relatively higher depressive symptoms resulted due to more social media use later only among adolescent girls.

The latest study stands in contrast to recent claims that suggests teenagers’ use of social media could lead to depression.

“You have to follow the same people over time in order to draw the conclusion that social media use predicts greater depressive symptoms. By using two large longitudinal samples, we were able to empirically test that assumption,” said lead author Taylor Heffer from the Brock University in Canada.

For the study, the team surveyed 594 adolescents and 1,132 college undergraduates.

The results, published in Clinical Psychological Science, showed that social media use did not predict depressive symptoms later among adolescents or college undergraduates; rather, greater depressive symptoms predicted more social media use over time, but only among adolescent girls.

Depression
Depression is a common mental disorder. Flickr

“This finding contrasts with the idea that people who use a lot of social media become more depressed over time. Instead, adolescent girls who are feeling down may turn to social media to try and make themselves feel better,” said Heffer.

Overall, the research suggests that the fear surrounding social media use and its impact on mental health may be premature.

“When parents read media headlines such as ‘Facebook Depression’, there is an inherent assumption that social media use leads to depression,” added Heffer.

Also Read- Exercise Can Help Fight Against Deep Abdominal Belly Fat: Study

In addition, different groups of people use social media for different reasons including making social comparisons or while feeling down. While another group of people may use it for more positive reasons, such as keeping in contact with friends, according to the study.

Examining the role that these differences play will help clarify the ways in which social media interacts with mental health, with implications for parents, policymakers, and healthcare professionals alike, the study noted. (IANS)