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Haryana murders: How a minor dispute led to multiple gang murders

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Gurgaon: Haryana Police have finally gunned down Sandeep Garauli, who is reportedly one of the gang leaders in a Gurgaon village.These gangs were born due to a dispute over a small plot in land and led to a dozen cold blooded murders.

Bhoop Singh and Mehar Chand, both Jats and from Garauli village on the Gurgaon-Pataudi Road, got into a row over a 200 square metre residential plot in the mid-1990s.

In 1997, as teenagers, Sandeep Garauli from Bhoop Singh’s camp and Narender from Mehar Chand’s camp challenged each other to take possession of the plot, police sources and villagers said.

After a few days, Narender and his friend Hemant stabbed Sandeep Garauli multiple times and threw him in a field, assuming he was dead. But he survived.

It was the beginning of the horror story. Narender and Hemant were booked for attempt to murder.

On December 15, 1999, Sandeep Garauli was for the first time booked for looting and under the Arms Act.

Garauli’s father was a sub-inspector in Haryana Police, and a few police personnel allegedly had a soft corner for Garauli.

According to police records, Sandeep Garauli’s elder brother Kuldeep Singh and his cousin Bhram Prakash murdered Mahavir Singh from Mehar Chand’s camp in 2000.

In retaliation, Mehar Chand’s men abducted Sandeep Garauli’s another brother, Naresh Kumar alias Nehru, an advocate, and allegedly burnt him to death at an isolated spot near Gurgaon’s Behrampur viilage in 2001.

By then, the original gang leaders were dead.

A furious Sandeep Garauli joined hands with Neetu Gahlot and Binder Gujjar, then part of the Fauji Gang. Eventually, he raised his own gang.

According to police records, Sandeep Garauli’s men attacked Hemant on January 10, 2004 when he was to be produced before the court of fast track judge BM Bajaj in Gurgaon.

Hemant was critically injured in the attack. Police constable Rajesh Kumar, who was escorting Hemant, died on the spot.

Later that day, police gunned down three accomplices of Sandeep Garauli after chasing them for 18 km in the foothills of Aravali.

Hemant succumbed to his injuries 18 days later.

Sandeep Garauli allegedly shot dead Randhir Singh in 2004 in Palam Vihar, one of the accused in the murder of his advocate brother.

On September 23, 2004, Garauli allegedly gunned down his main rival Narender – with whom he had had a fight in 1997 – in a village in Jhajjar district.

During this period, some other criminals, including Neetu Gahlot and Sangeeta Rajje, then vice chairperson of Gurgaon Municipal Council and wife of slain gangster Rajesh Nasa alias Rajje Punjabi, were also shot dead in internecine war, police records show.

Haridatt, a right hand of Sandeep Garauli, was gunned down by the Binder Gujjar gang in a court in retaliation, police say.

A year later, in the same premises, Sandeep Garauli and his men allegedly gunned down Dharamveer Ullawas from the Gujjar camp.

Sandeep Garauli’s gang also shot dead Gujjar’s relative-driver Ashok Kumar in Gurgaon in the first week of October 2015.

Gujjar’s men then murdered Rajkumar Sethi, who allegedly financed Sandeep Garauli.
Police Commissioner Navdeep Singh Virk said his force was determined to bring down the crime graph in Gurgaon, a business hub in Haryana that adjoins New Delhi.

He said Gujjar was in jail and the Crime Branch had eliminated Sandeep Garauli in Mumbai. The Crime Branch officials who killed him would get out of turn promotions. (IANS)(Photo: sify.com)

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Return to Jammu- A Novel About a Journey

The author has superbly captured the life of the kid in a cantonment, growing up with two sisters, his mother's struggle to run the house on a tight budget and his father, a happy-go-lucky man, who avoids the responsibilities of a good husband.

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He describes vividly how the family shifts to Jammu on his father's transfer, giving even the minutest details of their belongings, and of their journey to Jammu via Pathankot.
Sanasar, Jammu and Kasmir- wikimedia commons

This is the engrossing tale of Balan, a kid from South India who grows up in the towns of Punjab, Jammu and Haryana. It captures the eventful journey of Balan’s childhood, his schooling, and the friends he makes and loses due to transfers of his father, serving in the Indian Army.

“Return to Jammu” is a first-person narration and with the timelines, places and real-life personalities and events, the reader gets a feeling that it is an autobiographical novel. The author clarifies that all characters and the story per se are fictional but confesses to borrowing liberally from many episodes of his childhood in telling the story.

“If you happen to be acquainted with me enough to perceive a passing resemblance of me in Balan, you would be right; and yet if you find the resemblance rather tenuous and liberally adulterated, you will be equally right too,” says the author in a preliminary note.

Settled in Jammu, Balan is admitted into grade two, though just four years and seven months old. He remains younger and tinier than his peer group all through his schooling and even in college.
V. Raghunathan-Author of the book Return to Jammu, wikimedia commons

Balan, son of a junior commissioned officer hailing from Kerala and having Tamilian roots, is born in the Ambala cantonment in 1954. He narrates his story even before his birth, relying on family tellings.

The author has superbly captured the life of the kid in a cantonment, growing up with two sisters, his mother’s struggle to run the house on a tight budget and his father, a happy-go-lucky man, who avoids the responsibilities of a good husband.

He describes vividly how the family shifts to Jammu on his father’s transfer, giving even the minutest details of their belongings, and of their journey to Jammu via Pathankot.

Settled in Jammu, Balan is admitted into grade two, though just four years and seven months old. He remains younger and tinier than his peer group all through his schooling and even in college. Because of his diminutive size, he is saddled with sobriquets like pocket edition, Lilliputian and Madrasi, and sees his self-esteem falling dangerously.

He describes vividly how the family shifts to Jammu on his father's transfer, giving even the minutest details of their belongings, and of their journey to Jammu via Pathankot.
Jammu and Kashmir Map, wikimedia commons

It’s at Satwari near Jammu that he develops childhood friendship with many, most importantly with Jeevan Asha or Jeesha, who was two years older and also taller than him. Soon, however, Balan’s father is again transferred to Ambala and he is separated from his friends, especially Jeesha. He writes letters to his friends and receives responses from all, except Jeesha.

Overcoming all odds and with hard work, Balan completes his studies and joins the State Bank of India. Now a confident young man, he works hard and finally makes it to the Indian Institute of Management-Ahmedabad. (It was at IIM, Ahmedabad, that the author taught finance.)

Also Read: 70 years after Independence power reaches Elephanta Isle near Mumbai 

There he comes across a girl called Jasmine Pundith. He believes she is his good old buddy Jeesha. Bu she shows no sign of recognition and when he tries to remind her about their childhood friendship, Jasmine tells him that she is a citizen of the US and has no link with Jammu.

Convinced that she is none other than Jeesha, Balan travels to Delhi to find out more about her family. He even returns to Jammu, where he meets her brother Niranjan. What Balan comes to know from him forms the climax of the story.

The book is worth a read also for the author’s eye for detail, whether it is canal system of Jammu, the picturesque Kashmir valley, especially Uri, the pilgrimage to Vaishno Devi, or a visit by then Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru. (IANS)