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“Mirage” : Textures of Rajasthan brought alive at Painting Exhibition in New Delhi

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A Rajasthani Painting (representational Image), Wikimedia

New Delhi, April 22, 2017: It’s a veritable riot of colour at artist and curator Priyanka Banerjees painting exhibition which brings alive the real textures of Rajasthan.

Presented by Seems, the exhibition titled “Mirage” which is being held at the India Habitat Centre here, showcases Banerjee’s love for travel that has taken her far and wide in the country and across the globe.

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Amidst her myriad likes for various cultures it was Rajasthan that she fell in love with.

“I have travelled extensively across the length and breadth of the state and it captivated my mind. I was taken aback by their hospitality and wanted to share my experience. And what could have been better than portraying them on canvas,” Banerjee told IANS.

From Pink City Jaipur, to the bylanes the limestoned walled city of Jaiselmer, from the palace city of Jodhpur where she has captivated the glory of Mehrangarh fort to the ruins the city of lakes, Udaipur, from Chittorgarh which reminds the beauty of queen Padmini and tales of her jauhar to the natural reserves of Ranthambore, Sariska as also to the Pushkar cattle fair – each narrative is about the artist’s own lived experiences.

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The 25 paintings capture the soul of the state it all through her camera, sketch-pad, paints and brushes using different mediums like watercolour on paper, soft pastels on paper and acrylic on canvas.

“Some of the paintings like those based on acrylic took around eight days to complete while the watercolours were completed in a few hours,” Banerjee added.

A long-time admirer of Raja Ravi Verma, Banerjee also gets inspiration from contemporary artists like Biplob Biswas, Vijay Biswal and Bikas Bhattacharjee. (IANS)

Next Story

Rajasthan’s Leading Properties Go Green To Follow The Sustainable Route

Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

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Famous Forts in India
Amer fort, Jaipur, Rajasthan (Pic Credits : Elene Machaidze)

From plastic straws to copper vessels, handmade lamps and bangles, Rajasthan’s leading hospitality players here are establishing new trends by engaging local artisans to showcase traditional artistry to guests and serving them locally-inspired cuisine amid green surroundings.

“We have initiated the use of paper-made straws; there is no use of plastic bags anywhere in the hotel property and the local-inspired food is being served to guests to ensure the locals have a regular source of income,” Binny Sebastian, General Manager, Bishangarh’s Alila Fort heritage hotel, some 50 km from here, told IANS.

Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

organic farming
Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

“Our association with the locals is quite strong. Working with them, we take our guests to the local temple. They also visit the artisans’ houses and sip tea there while watching them make pottery and weave carpet. In this way, we ensure that locals get a decent livelihood,” Sebastian added.

“We have started getting regular income since this property came up a year back. We have been showing our art to the guests here which gives us satisfaction as well as an income,” said Nizamuddin, a bangle maker.

Ashok S. Rathore, General Manager of the Rambagh Palace, said: “We have curtailed the use of plastic. There are no plastic straws being used on the property. We serve in glass bottles instead of plastic water bottles.”

This property is also adopting sustainable routes to ensure that the locals get decent income opportunities for their sustenance.

Famous forts in India
Chittorgarh Fort, Rajasthan (Wikimedia Commons)

“Our interiors are reminiscent of handmade interiors. Our suites are adorned with Thikri art, a rare gold-dipped miniature artwork of Rajasthan. But skilled artists are disappearing and it comes with a high cost of production,” said Rathore.

Also Read: Stop “Stereotyping” Northeast, States Hold Strong Cultural Harmony

Fairmont Jaipur has incorporated the fine craftsmanship and beauty of the local cultural heritage and artisans of Jaipur. The ceilings are hand-painted by local artisans with complex motifs.

“We associate with the local artisans to showcase their talent at the hotel in the form of the evening entertainment, the welcome experience and celebrate the local heritage of Rajasthan,” said Srijan Vadhera, General Manager, Fairmont Jaipur. (IANS)