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Mischievous Nature In Boys May Result in Increased Burn Injuries: Study

Boys are more prone to burn injuries because of their "mischievous nature and greater activity levels"

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Boys, Mischief, injuries, study
Mischievous boys are more prone to burn injuries. Pixabay

Boys are more prone to burn injuries because of their “mischievous nature and greater activity levels”, the study conducted by Rashmin Roy and Yuri Dias Amborcar said.

Children between the ages of one and five, especially boys, are more prone to burn injuries, a study conducted at Goa’s top government-run hospital, the Goa Medical College, has revealed.

Published in the latest edition of the International Journal of Scientific Research, the study was spread over four years and covered 271 paediatric patients who were treated at the Goa Medical College.

Boys, Mischief, Injuries, Study
Boys playing football in Egypt. Wikimedia Commons

“Males (56 per cent) were affected more than females (44 per cent), similar to reports from previous studies. This may be attributable to the mischievous nature and greater activity levels of boys.”

Out of the 271 paediatric patients admitted to the hospital for burn injuries, 70 per cent were below the age of five years, it added.

“Infants and toddlers learn to be mobile at this age. They start actively searching and reaching out to their environment and readily encounter hazards in the home. Children between ages one and five in our study were seen to be at the greatest risk of all.

“It is attributed to the fact that children are many times left unattended at home and they are too young to understand the dangers of being in the vicinity of injurious agents. Our study showed almost 70 per cent of the patients were below five years of age, and had male sex predominance, both of which conform to other studies on paediatric burns,” it also said.

Boys, Mischief, Injuries, Study
Out of the 271 paediatric patients admitted to the hospital for burn injuries, 70 per cent were below the age of five years, it added. Wikimedia Commons

Among children, scalds — injuries caused to the skin when it comes in contact with extreme heat — are the most common burn injuries.

“Scalds (89 per cent) were predominant in patients of age less than five years, followed by older children who sustain injury caused mainly by flames (13 per cent),” the study said.

While in older children, flame burns caused by household fires and firecrackers are more common, scalds were caused by hot water, hot tea, or milk, the study said, adding that children sustained electric-contact burns in many instances as high as 25 per cent.

The study also revealed a relatively quick emergency response time vis a vis hospitalisation of paediatric patients with burn injuries in Goa.

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“Time of presentation at the hospital after the incidence of burns is very important in view of the management of burns is concerned. In our study, 76 per cent patients were arrived in less than six hours of accident that leads to faster treatment and better survival of patients,” the study said, adding that the overall death rate on account of burn injuries found during the study was 2.21 per cent.

“Mortality was found to be higher in the younger age group, in females, and in extensive burns more than 50 per cent. Sepsis remains the major cause of death.” (IANS)

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Novel Algorithms to Spot Online Trolls, Says Study

The study was presented on December 14 last year at the AI for Social Good workshop at the 2019 Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems in Vancouver, Canada

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Algorithms
Starting with one keyword, this model can be used to find others that are closely related to that word to reveal clusters of relevant terms that are actually in use. Pixabay

Researchers, including two of Indian-origin, have demonstrated that machine-learning algorithms can monitor online social media conversations as they evolve, which could one day lead to an effective and automated way to spot online trolling.

Prevention of online harassment requires rapid detection of offensive, harassing, and negative social media posts, which in turn requires monitoring online interactions.

Current methods to obtain such social media data are either fully automated and not interpretable or rely on a static set of keywords, which can quickly become outdated. Neither method is very effective, according to Indian-origin researcher Maya Srikanth, from California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in the US.

“It isn’t scalable to have humans try to do this work by hand, and those humans are potentially biased,” Srikanth said.

“On the other hand, keyword searching suffers from the speed at which online conversations evolve. New terms crop up and old terms change meaning, so a keyword that was used sincerely one day might be meant sarcastically the next,” she added.

According to the study, the research team used a GloVe (Global Vectors for Word Representation) model to discover new and relevant keywords.

GloVe is a word-embedding model, meaning that it represents words in a vector space, where the “distance” between two words is a measure of their linguistic or semantic similarity.

New algorithms to spot online trolls: Study
New algorithms to spot online trolls: Study. (IANS)

Starting with one keyword, this model can be used to find others that are closely related to that word to reveal clusters of relevant terms that are actually in use.

For example, searching Twitter for uses of “MeToo” in conversations yielded clusters of related hashtags like “SupportSurvivors,” “ImWithHer,” and “NotSilent.”

This approach gives researchers a dynamic and ever-evolving keyword set to search.

The project was a proof-of-concept aimed at one day giving social media platforms a more powerful tool to spot online harassment.

“The field of AI research is becoming more inclusive, but there are always people who resist change,” said researcher Anima Anandkumar, who in 2018 found herself the target of harassment and threats online because of her successful effort to switch to an acronym without potentially offensive connotations.

Also Read: Actress Sunny Leone: Violence is Something That our Children See and Learn

“It was an eye-opening experience about just how ugly trolling can get. Hopefully, the tools we’re developing now will help fight all kinds of harassment in the future,” she added.

The study was presented on December 14 last year at the AI for Social Good workshop at the 2019 Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems in Vancouver, Canada. (IANS)