Friday August 23, 2019

Mission Delhi to Provide Care to STEMI, Very Serious Type of Heart Attack Patients

A STEMI patient requires treatment within the golden hour (90 minutes) of the onset of symptoms and providing clot buster therapy

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Mission Delhi, STEMI, Heart Attack
The Mission Delhi aims to provide care to STEMI, a very serious type of heart attack, patients. Pixabay

It takes just 10 minutes to treat someone under the Mission Delhi programme, started by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) along with the All India institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS).

The Mission Delhi aims to provide care to STEMI, a very serious type of heart attack, patients. A STEMI patient requires treatment within the golden hour (90 minutes) of the onset of symptoms and providing clot buster therapy within 30 minutes.

“Just rang up at 14:43 and within ten minutes the team of doctors arrived with their kits. We were all surprised and amazed with the prompt service. We are happy and appreciate people who thought of this initiative,” said one of the patients treated by the staff under Mission Delhi.

Heart diseases are the leading cause of death in the country. “Ischemic heart disease and stroke account for over 80 per cent of deaths both in rural and urban areas. We need to save precious lives by increasing awareness regarding STEMI symptoms and reaching the patients at the earliest,” said Dr Ramakrishnan, a leading cardiologist at AIIMS.

Mission Delhi, STEMI, Heart Attack
It takes just 10 minutes to treat someone under the Mission Delhi programme. Pixabay

The heart is like a motor that pumps blood to the body as well as the heart through three pipes — the coronary arteries. If any of these pipes is blocked by a clot, the heart tissue beyond that area dies. In the initial hours, clot busters can restore the blood flow and stop the damage to heart tissue. If the treatment is provided in the first 30 minutes, complete recovery is possible,” said Dr Praveen Aggarwal from the Department of Emergency Medicine at AIIMS.

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THe motorcycle ambulance system moved easily through traffic jams and offer timely and quality care led by consultants at AIIMS to patients at their residence itself. (IANS)

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Heart Attack Cases Higher in Areas with More Fast Food Outlets: Researchers

“The ubiquitous presence of fast food is an important consideration for the ongoing development of rural and metropolitan areas,” he said

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While it is known that eating fast food is not good for health, researchers, including one of an Indian-origin, have found that areas with a higher number of fast food outlets record more heart attack cases.

Published in the European Heart Journal, the findings also showed that for every additional fast food outlet, there were four additional heart attacks per 100,000 people each year.

The findings were consistent across rural and metropolitan areas after adjusting for age, obesity, high blood lipids, high blood pressure, smoking status, and diabetes. The results emphasise the importance of the food environment as a potential contributor towards health, said Indian-origin researcher Tarunpreet Saluja from the University of Newcastle in Australia.

This retrospective cohort study included 3,070 patients admitted to hospital with a heart attack between 2011 and 2013.

Fast Food. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

The researchers recorded the total number of outlets within each local government area and compared different areas to analyse the association between density of fast food restaurants and incidence of heart attack.

“The ubiquitous presence of fast food is an important consideration for the ongoing development of rural and metropolitan areas,” he said.

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“This study highlights the impact of the food environment on health. In addition to regulating the location and density of fast food outlets, local areas should ensure good access to supermarkets with healthy food,” said Jeroen Bax, Professor at the Leiden University in Netherlands. (IANS)