Thursday January 23, 2020

Mission Delhi to Provide Care to STEMI, Very Serious Type of Heart Attack Patients

A STEMI patient requires treatment within the golden hour (90 minutes) of the onset of symptoms and providing clot buster therapy

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Mission Delhi, STEMI, Heart Attack
The Mission Delhi aims to provide care to STEMI, a very serious type of heart attack, patients. Pixabay

It takes just 10 minutes to treat someone under the Mission Delhi programme, started by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) along with the All India institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS).

The Mission Delhi aims to provide care to STEMI, a very serious type of heart attack, patients. A STEMI patient requires treatment within the golden hour (90 minutes) of the onset of symptoms and providing clot buster therapy within 30 minutes.

“Just rang up at 14:43 and within ten minutes the team of doctors arrived with their kits. We were all surprised and amazed with the prompt service. We are happy and appreciate people who thought of this initiative,” said one of the patients treated by the staff under Mission Delhi.

Heart diseases are the leading cause of death in the country. “Ischemic heart disease and stroke account for over 80 per cent of deaths both in rural and urban areas. We need to save precious lives by increasing awareness regarding STEMI symptoms and reaching the patients at the earliest,” said Dr Ramakrishnan, a leading cardiologist at AIIMS.

Mission Delhi, STEMI, Heart Attack
It takes just 10 minutes to treat someone under the Mission Delhi programme. Pixabay

The heart is like a motor that pumps blood to the body as well as the heart through three pipes — the coronary arteries. If any of these pipes is blocked by a clot, the heart tissue beyond that area dies. In the initial hours, clot busters can restore the blood flow and stop the damage to heart tissue. If the treatment is provided in the first 30 minutes, complete recovery is possible,” said Dr Praveen Aggarwal from the Department of Emergency Medicine at AIIMS.

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THe motorcycle ambulance system moved easily through traffic jams and offer timely and quality care led by consultants at AIIMS to patients at their residence itself. (IANS)

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Stroke Patients At a Risk of Suffering From Heart Attack: Study

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Heart attack
Stroke Patients more likely to have a heart attack or another major cardiovascular event within thirty days of having a stroke. Pixabay

Both women and men are significantly more likely to have a heart attack or another major cardiovascular event, according to a new study.

The research, published in the journal Stroke, demonstrated for the first time that in people with no underlying heart disease, after a stroke they were more than 20 times more likely than those who didn’t have a stroke (23-fold in women and 25-fold in men) to have a first-in-life major adverse cardiovascular event.

These events include things like heart attack, chest pain, cardiac failure or cardiac death.

This risk dropped after 30 days, but even one year after a stroke, men and women both still had twice the risk of a major cardiac event than those who didn’t have a stroke, according to the study.

“This shows that after taking risk factors into consideration, having experienced a recent stroke was independently associated with the incidence of major adverse cardiac events,” said study researcher Luciano Sposato, Associate Professor at Western University in Canada.

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Stroke Patients may suffer from heart attack, chest pain, cardiac failure or cardiac death. Pixabay

“This leads us to believe that there are underlying mechanisms linked to stroke that may be causing heart disease,” Sposato added.

For the findings, the research team examined ICES data for more than 90,000 adults over the age of 65 in Ontario with no pre-existing clinical diagnosis of heart disease.

The researchers examined the incidence of cardiac events in two groups – a group of just over 20,000 that had a stroke and a group of approximately 70,000 individuals without stroke but with similar vascular risk factors, comorbidities and demographic characteristics.

In a paper published earlier in 2019, Sposato and collaborators used animal models to back up this finding by demonstrating that the brain damage caused by stroke leads to inflammation and scarring in the left atrium of the heart.

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These changes are well-known structural abnormalities for a number of heart diseases such as heart attacks, heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias.

The researchers hope this information will inform clinical practice and encourage health care providers to watch for cardiovascular symptoms in patients who recently had strokes. (IANS)