Monday February 26, 2018
Home Uncategorized Misunderstand...

Misunderstandings with India cleared, says Nepal PM Oli

0
//
55
Photo: www.todayonline.com
Republish
Reprint

By Deepak Goel

New Delhi: Nepal Prime Minister K.P. Sharma Oli, on returning home, has chosen to describe his six-day state visit to India as “very successful”, contending that it helped to clear misunderstandings between the two neighbors and restore harmonious relations.

The assertion comes after Kathmandu during the past six months had accused New Delhi of intervening in its sovereign constitution-drafting process; of imposing a blockade which caused a humanitarian crisis in the landlocked Himalayan nation; and of stoking and supporting the Madhesi agitation in the southern Terai plains.

New Delhi, in turn, accused Kathmandu of not addressing the internal political conflict in the Nepali Terai, which has cross-border security implications. India also raised, on international platforms, the issue of Nepal’s human rights violations.

It also accused Nepal of stoking ‘anti-India’ sentiment and has been irritated, though not particularly worried, about Nepal’s attempt to use the ‘China card’.

However, the two neighbors, for now, appear to have chosen to forget the mutual recriminations and get down to the task of much desired economic progress.

During Oli’s state visit, the two sides signed nine agreements, ranging from infrastructure to rail and road transit. They agreed on post-earthquake reconstruction in Nepal, strengthening of road infrastructure in the Terai area of the Himalayan nation, transit routes, rail transport, and the 400 KV Muzaffarpur-Dhalkebar transmission line.

Oli’s visit also took him to Bhuj, in Gujarat, which has risen like the Phoenix after the destruction wreaked by the January 26, 2001, earthquake. Oli described the Bhuj visit as significant, as he thought the reconstruction activities there after the 2001 temblor could be tremendously useful for Nepal’s own reconstruction.

Oli, on return to Kathmandu at the end of his February 19-24 visit, said his main mission was to “clear the misunderstanding” with India and take ties between the two neighbors to the same level as in 2014, when Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited Nepal.

After the bilateral talks with Modi in New Delhi, Oli said: “The misunderstanding that persisted in the last few months is no longer there. I believe our relationship will greatly benefit from our discussions. It is high time to look at India-Nepal relations with a forward-looking approach in the interest of the two countries and their people.”

However, while Oli described Nepal’s Constitution — promulgated on September 20 last year — as “historic”, Modi called it a “major achievement” and stressed that its success depends on “consensus and dialogue”.

With the Nepal PM listening, he said: “The announcement of the new constitution in Nepal came after decades of struggle there… I appreciate the contribution of the political leadership and the people of Nepal for it… But its success depends on consensus and dialogue.”

“I am confident on the basis of these principles and through political dialogue and by taking all sections together, you (Oli) will be able to resolve all issues relating to the constitution satisfactorily and take Nepal forward towards the path of development and stability.”

Modi’s assertion amply demonstrated that India did not fully endorse the new constitution as it needed a wider ownership and inclusion.

The conversation took place only a month after Nepal’s parliament passed two constitutional amendments which avowedly sought to address the grievances of the Madhesis and other minorities of the Nepali Terai.

While the two leaders described the document differently — showing the distance in the understanding of issues, Indian Foreign Secretary S. Jaishankar said the Nepali PM has given assurances on issues pertaining to constituency delimitation and citizenship, and that India was confident these would be followed through.

A significant feature of Oli’s state visit was the absence of a joint communique at the end of the visit. The development marked a departure as the tradition of issuing joint communiques at the end of the visits of Nepali heads of state or government to India has usually been followed — at least since 1990.

Officials privy to the visit said preparations were afoot in New Delhi earlier on the joint communique and senior officials from both the sides were engaged in finalizing its wording. But at the last moment, no joint statement was issued after India refused to say categorically that it welcomed Nepal’s new constitution.

On the other hand, Nepal wanted to get the phrase ‘India welcomes the new constitution in Nepal’ incorporated in the joint communique, a Nepali official said in Kathmandu.

Oli is learnt to have assured that the pending issues regarding the demands of the Medhesis would be addressed in a time-bound manner. Modi told Oli that India has always wanted peace, stability and prosperity of Nepal and that it would extend all possible help to ensure its all-round development.

What emerges from the Oli visit is that Nepal is more interested in appeasing India rather than reaching out to its own people in the Terai. This may have partially satisfied India’s desire to reassert its centrality in Nepal but it does not solve the problem of Madhesi and Tharu alienation. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Ancient Hindu Temple Changu Narayan in Nepal Possesses Historical Significance

Changu Narayan is a sacred Hindu temple in Nepal and was built in the memory of Lord Vishnu

0
//
143
Changu Narayan Temple is an ancient Hindu temple in Nepal. Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • Changu Narayan is considered to be the oldest temple in Nepal
  • It is based on a high hilltop know was Changu or Dolagiri
  • It is dedicated to Lord Vishnu and has an interesting tale behind it

New Delhi, July 14, 2017: The ancient Hindu temple Changu Narayan is situated on the top of a high hill well known as Changu or Dolagiri. The temple had a neighboring forest of champak tree and a small village called Changu and is situated in Bhaktapur District, Nepal.

The hill is about 7 miles or 12 km east of Kathmandu and a few miles north of Bhaktapur. This holy place “changu narayan Temple” is devoted to Lord Vishnu and held in admiration by the people of Hindu religion. Changu Narayan is believed to be the oldest temple in Nepal’s history. Bhaktapur king established kingdoms in Kashmir and kept it as Hindu kingdom.

ALSO READ: Hindu Temple Kamakhya questions the Dominant Religious Legacies against Menstrual Blood

“changu narayan Temple” has a very intriguing story behind its existence. In old times, a Gwala, a cow herder, was given a cow by a Brahmin whose name was Sudarshan. The cow was believed to produce milk in large quantities. The cow herder used to take the cow for grazing to Change, which was a Champak trees forest that time. The cow was always found under a particular tree’s shade while grazing. In the evening, when the Gwala started milking the cow at his house, he received only a negligible quantity of milk. This continued for a number of days. He was disappointed and told the Brahmin about the cow not giving enough quantity of milk. After seeing this incident with his eyes, Sudarshan agreed and they decided that they should examine the cow while her grazing activity was being undertaken.

Changu Narayan Temple, east side, with the griffin (stone sculpture) left at the entrance. Source: Wikimedia

Both of them hid behind the trees and observed the cow. They noticed that a small black boy who had come out of the tree started feeding himself with the milk. This infuriated the two men as they thought of the boy as a demon and the tree as its home.

So the champak tree was cut down by the Brahmin. While he was doing this, he saw human blood come out of the champak tree. Both Brahmin and Gwala presumed they had done a crime and started crying.

Lord Vishnu suddenly emerged and told the Gwala and Brahmin, the mistake was not theirs and began narrating the story of him committing a crime by unknowingly murdering Sudarshan’s father while forest hunting. Afterward, he was cursed and he wandered on his mouth, as ‘Garuda’ descending on the Changu hill where he survived on stolen milk. The cutting down of the tree by Brahmin beheaded Vishnu and freed him from his sins.

You Should Not Miss: Angkor Wat – world’s largest hindu temple in Cambodia

Following this incident, Brahmin and Gwala started worshiping that place and built a small temple of Lord Vishnu. That place has been considered sacred ever since. Even today, Sudarshan’s descendant is one of the priest of that temple and the Gwala’s descendants as conservators.

People belonging to Newar community reside in and around the area of Changu Narayan. Due to tourism development in this area, we can locate many hotels, souvenir shops, restaurants etc.

However, this holy temple “changu narayan” faces a lot of challenges and threats. The Manohara stream has witnessed rampant mining of sand and stones. The local administration has failed to cut down the mining activities. Due to these mining activities, the temple area has become prone to landslides. Because of overgrazing in the nearby forest, the chances of soil erosion and landslide have become very high.

– prepared by Harsimran Kaur of NewsGram. Twitter @Hkaur1025