Saturday December 15, 2018

New mobile application can reduce stroke risk

The application has been under development for quite some time -- it took seven years of careful research to achieve it

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  • Researchers have developed a new mobile application
  • This application can detect stroke
  • This timely detection can help in preventing stroke

Researchers have developed a new mobile application that can detect atrial fibrillation, a leading cause of stroke, and can timely prevent heart-related complications.

Heart-related problems can now be detected by the help of mobile apps.
Heart-related problems can now be detected by the help of mobile apps.

Atrial fibrillation is an irregular and often rapid heart rate that can increase the risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. Timely detection of atrial fibrillation is crucial for effective stroke prevention.

“This is the first time that ordinary consumer electronics have achieved such reliable results that they can be actually beneficial for the patient’s medical care,” said co-author Juhani Airaksinen, Professor of Cardiology from Turku University Hospital in Finland.

“The results are remarkable as intermittent atrial fibrillation is not always detected even at the doctor’s office,” Airaksinen added. Detecting atrial fibrillation has been a worldwide medical challenge for years, but affordable solutions available for all have been lacking, the researcher added.

Also Read: Even less physically fit people can help themselves to prevent risk of Heart related Diseases: Study

For the study, published in the journal Circulation, researchers studied 300 patients with heart problems, half of whom had atrial fibrillation. The researchers managed to identify the patients with atrial fibrillation from the other group with a smartphone.

The application developed at the Department of Future Technologies of the University of Turku can detect patients with atrial fibrillation to up to 96 percent accuracy, the researchers said.

Strokes can be prevented using this app. Pixabay

“The results are also significant in that the group included different kinds of patients, some of whom had heart failure, coronary disease, and ventricular extrasystole at the same time,” said Tero Koivisto from the Department of Future Technologies.

The application has been under development for quite some time — it took seven years of careful research to achieve it, the researcher said. IANS

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Exercise May help to Reduce Stroke Risk in Menopausal Women

For the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers examined 3,003 midlife women undergoing the transition to menopause

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Exercise
Exercise may cut the risk of stroke in menopausal women. Pixabay

Mid-aged women transitioning to menopause may be able to lower their risk of developing stroke, heart disease and Type-2 diabetes if they exercise more or eat a low calorie diet, suggests a research.

The study showed that physically active women were less likely to get incidents of metabolic syndrome than inactive women.

Metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of risk factors that increase the chances of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Genetic factors, excess body fat, and lack of exercise can add to its development.

Patients with metabolic syndrome are diagnosed when they have three or more of these risk factors — large amount of abdominal body fat, low (“good”) cholesterol, high levels of fat in the blood, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose.

Exercise is crucial for everyone. Pixabay

“Previous studies have largely focused on cardiovascular disease and Type-2 diabetes in postmenopausal women. This study is unique because it focuses on an earlier stage in women’s lives, the menopausal transition in midlife, to potentially prevent such diseases from occurring,” said Jennifer S. Lee, Associate Professor at the Stanford Health Care in the US.

For the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers examined 3,003 midlife women undergoing the transition to menopause.

Also Read- Weight Loss Surgery To Combat Womb Cancer in Obese Women

They identified patterns of cardiometabolic risk and found central obesity to be the most common factor for causing metabolic syndrome.

“Discovering which modifiable factors like physical activity and a lower calorie diet are more common in midlife women who recover from metabolic syndrome, in this study, could better inform what preventive strategies to consider in women earlier in their lives,” Lee noted. (IANS)