Saturday, September 19, 2020
Home Life Style Health & Fitness Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine May Not Increase Risk of More Severe Disease: Study

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine May Not Increase Risk of More Severe Disease: Study

Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine Appears to Clear Safety Hurdle

A series of studies in mice of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine lent some assurance that it may not increase the risk of more severe disease, and that one dose may provide protection against the novel coronavirus, according to preliminary data released Friday as per COVID-19 Information & Resources.

Prior studies on a vaccine for SARS — a close cousin to the new virus that causes COVID-19 — suggests vaccines against this type of virus might have the unintended effect of causing more severe disease when the vaccinated person is later exposed to the pathogen, especially in individuals who do not produce an adequately strong immune response.

Scientists have seen this risk as a hurdle to clear before vaccines can be safely tested in thousands of healthy people.

Follow NewsGram on Instagram to keep yourself updated.

While the data released by the U.S. National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) and Moderna offered some assurance, the studies do not fully answer the question.

“This is the barest beginning of preliminary information,” said Dr. Gregory Poland, an immunologist and vaccine researcher at the Mayo Clinic who has seen the paper, which has yet to undergo peer review.

Poland said the paper was incomplete and disorganized and that the numbers of animals tested were small.

The authors said they have submitted the work to a top-tier journal. Moderna’s vaccine is in midstage testing in healthy volunteers. Moderna said Thursday that it plans to begin final-stage trials enrolling 30,000 people in July.

Moderna COVID-19 vaccine lent some assurance
A man stands outside an entrance to a Moderna building in Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 18, 2020. VOA

In the animal studies, mice received one or two shots of a variety of doses of Moderna’s vaccine, including doses considered not strong enough to elicit a protective immune response. Researchers then exposed the mice to the virus.

Subsequent analyses suggest “sub-protective” immune responses do not cause what is known as vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease, a susceptibility to more severe disease in the lungs.

“Subprotective doses did not prime mice for enhanced immunopathology following [exposure],” Dr. Barney Graham of the Vaccine Research Center at NIAID and colleagues wrote in the manuscript, posted on the bioRxiv website.

Further testing suggested the vaccine induces antibody responses to block the virus from infecting cells.

The vaccine also appeared to protect against infection by the coronavirus in the lungs and noses without evidence of toxic effects, the team wrote.

They noted the mice that received just one dose before exposure to the virus seven weeks later were “completely protected against lung viral replication,” suggesting a single vaccination prevented the virus from replicating in the lungs.

Moderna COVID-19 vaccine lent some assurance
The vaccine induces antibody responses to block the virus from infecting cells. (Representative Image). Pixabay

Also Read: Six Things You Need to Know About the COVID-19 Pandemic

“At first glance, it looks promising in inducing neutralizing antibody protection in mice,” Dr. Peter Hotez, a researcher at Baylor College of Medicine, said in an email. He had not reviewed the paper in detail.

Poland, who was not involved with the research, said the paper leaves out “important parameters” that could help scientists judge the work.

“The results, such as they are presented, provide interesting data that are reassuring. … This needs to be replicated and it needs to be peer-reviewed,” he said. (VOA)

STAY CONNECTED

19,152FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,773FollowersFollow

Most Popular

Neglected Children More Likely To Have Teen Pregnancy: Study

Researchers have found that children who experience neglect are seven times more likely than other abuse victims to have a teen pregnancy. The study, published...

Sakharam Binder: Play That Explores Idea Of Censorship

Back in the early 1970s, Marathi playwright Vijay Tendulkar's play 'Sakharam Binder' -- which features the character of a bookbinder who 'takes in' women...

Patients With Covid-19 Likely To Diagnose With A Heart Stroke

Researchers have found that Covid-19 may be diagnosed on the same emergency scans intended to diagnose stroke. The findings published in the American Journal of...

Asian-Americans Experience Increased Racism Since Covid-19: Report

A report released by a US civil rights group showed Asian-Americans have experienced increased racism since the Covid-19 pandemic hit the country more than...

Hair Tips By Actress Kajol

Actress Kajol has often sported bouncy curls, and it is not too difficult to have hair like hers, she assures. Sharing a candid photo taken...

Twitter Halts Transparency Web Series Promotion. Is Twitter Biased?

By NewsGram Desk Twitter, a well-known platform to share ideas, thoughts, spread awareness, advertise our new ideas and projects, is suddenly taking down advertisements and...

Traditional Matchmaking Holds a Lot of Prejudiced, Preconceived Notions: Physician Rupam Kaur

By Siddhi Jain For Rupam Kaur, an Indian-American physician, the pursuit of finding love a second time took more than the traditional formula of meeting...

10 Facts on How Mosquitoes are One of the Deadliest Creatures in the World

A warmer climate, travel and trade are helping to spread mosquito-borne diseases as a deadly beast smaller than a paper clip poses a threat...

Recent Comments

Donate to NewsGram to support quality journalism.
x