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Chandigarh Rally: Modi attacks opposition for parliament fracas, causes disruption for Aam Aadmi

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source: timesofindia
source: timesofindia
source: timesofindia

By Newsgram Staff Writer

The current imbroglio caused by the opposition in Parliament has now been attributed to “some people’s egos” by Prime Minister Narendra Modi while also saying that he would take the obstruction to the people’s parliament and let them decide on the contentious issue.

“People of this country will never forgive political parties for their conduct in parliament. Some people, due to their ego, did not let the parliament function. This is most unfortunate.

“I have come here to say that the Jan Sabha (people’s parliament) is bigger than the Lok Sabha. I am taking my Lok Sabha case to the Jan Sabha of people,” Prime Minister Narendra Modi said in a public rally organised in Chandigarh.

However, the four-hour-long visit during which the Prime Minister inaugurated Chandigarh airport’s new civil terminal and addressed the convocation of the Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER) itself created disruptions for the people.

Nearly 200 schools were ordered shut in Chandigarh on Friday even as the police blocked roads to ensure smooth movement of Modi’s cavalcade. Access to critical healthcare services were visibly slowed down with ambulances being directed to long detours to reach hospitals.

The main cremation ground in sector 25, located next to the ground where Modi addressed the rally on Friday afternoon, too was out of bounds for people. Cremation of loved ones could only be done at the cremation grounds in nearby Mohali and Mani Majra.

Chandigarh traffic jam
Chandigarh traffic jam     source: tribuneindia

Later, to address the aam aadmi’s grievances, Modi expressed regret over the harassment and inconvenience caused.

“The inconvenience caused to the citizens of Chandigarh, especially shutting of schools, due to my visit is regretted and was totally avoidable.

“An inquiry will be held and responsibility fixed for the inconvenience caused to the people of Chandigarh,” Modi tweeted.

On the other side, during the rally, Modi raised a wide array of issues afflicting the Indian state and urged the people to question their MP’s before voting for them.

“We are running the government to take the country forward and attain development. You have given us the clear majority to run the government. Without bothering for the 400 MP’s in Lok Sabha, 40 people (MP’s) created obstacles in the development of this country. This was an insult to the democracy in this country,” Modi said.

On the recent decision of One Rank, One Pension for ex-servicemen (OROP), Modi said credit should not be given to the government but to “the poor and common people” and added that though the amount incurred was not less, it was “small when seen in light of the sacrifices made by our soldiers”.

Shifting his attention to the health sector at the 34th convocation of the PGIMER, Modi told the medical fraternity that people were now moving from treatment of illness towards achieving wellness.

Doctors who focus on patients were more successful than those who focus on the disease. Be compassionate (to patients) as doctors. Common people consider you as gods. Address wellness and well-being, not the illness alone.

“Things are changing in our society. People want to be away from medicines. Yoga is one tool to achieve that,” Modi, the yoga propounder said.

Besides emphasising on wellness, Modi reminded doctors about the obligation to their motherland.

“Many of you must have ready passports or have applied for visa. But you have an obligation towards the poor of its country,” Modi said.

Modi made the most of the inflexion date of the convocation with the 9/11 attacks by relating death and life, both choices that we have the power to make.

“To kill is very easy, but to keep someone alive or to give life is more important. You doctors are doing that,” Modi concluded with the inspirational play of words.

Next Story

The HIV Spread in Pakistan: Government And UN Investigating Causes

Some also blame unsafe injection practices by quack doctors for contributing to the spread of HIV. Government officials estimate about 600,000 unqualified doctors are unlawfully operating in Pakistan and 270,000 of them are practicing in Sindh. 

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HIV patients take part in an awareness session at Pakistan Society, a nongovernmental organization drop-in center, in Karachi, Nov. 30, 2013. Pixabay

Officials in Pakistan and the United Nations are investigating causes of a new outbreak of HIV infections in a southern district where nearly 400 people have been diagnosed in less than two weeks. Officials confirmed Saturday that nearly 80% of those infected are children, with nearly half of them under age 5.

Local media began reporting about the epidemic two weeks ago from Larkana, a district of Sindh province, which has already experienced three outbreaks in recent years. A local doctor who treated several patients with a single needle and syringe was blamed for spreading the virus, which causes AIDS.

The provincial government rushed teams of public health workers to the district, with an estimated population of 1.5 million, to quickly assess the situation and mobilize resources to curtail further spread of HIV. More than 9,000 people have since been subjected to screening in the affected district, and the process is continuing, Sikandar Memon, the provincial head of the AIDS Control Program, told reporters.

A UNAIDS spokeswoman told VOA that international partners had joined local teams to help quickly carry out an outbreak investigation and address the acute needs of the people infected with HIV, including immediately linking them to treatment, care and support services.

The spokeswoman, Fahmida Khan, said efforts were being made to ensure that unsafe injection and blood transfusion practices were being stopped. She also noted that there were unconfirmed reports of similar HIV outbreaks in surrounding districts.

FILE - Pakistani social activists carry placards during a rally to raise awareness on World AIDS Day in Lahore, Dec. 1, 2016.
Pakistani social activists carry placards during a rally to raise awareness on World AIDS Day in Lahore, Dec. 1, 2016. VOA

Focus of problem

Sindh, with a population of nearly 48 million, accounts for 43% of an estimated 150,000 people living with HIV in Pakistan.

U.N. officials say since 2010, there has been a 57% increase in new HIV/AIDS infections in Pakistan. They noted that among all identified HIV cases in Pakistan, 43,000 are females.

Last year, an estimated 20,000 people were newly identified with HIV in Pakistan and 6,200 people died of AIDS, according to local and U.N. officials.

Khan would not comment on the reasons for the high number of HIV infections among children and the potential causes of the latest outbreak in Larkana, saying “further investigations and epidemiological review is yet required and suggested.”

Provincial authorities also have launched a high-level investigation to ascertain the veracity of the allegations against the local doctor, who already has been taken into police custody.

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Pakistani and U.N. officials say the HIV epidemic in Pakistan remains largely concentrated among key populations, including people who inject drugs, the transgender community, sex workers and their clients, and men who have sex with men. Pixabay

Some also blame unsafe injection practices by quack doctors for contributing to the spread of HIV. Government officials estimate about 600,000 unqualified doctors are unlawfully operating in Pakistan and 270,000 of them are practicing in Sindh.

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Critics also blame lapses in Pakistan’s national health system, the low priority given to the problem, corruption, the recent abolition of the federal health ministry and the delegation of its functions to the provinces for the worsening health sector situation and the increase in HIV infections.

Pakistani and U.N. officials say the HIV epidemic in Pakistan remains largely concentrated among key populations, including people who inject drugs, the transgender community, sex workers and their clients, and men who have sex with men. (VOA)