Monday December 16, 2019
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Chandigarh Rally: Modi attacks opposition for parliament fracas, causes disruption for Aam Aadmi

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source: timesofindia
source: timesofindia
source: timesofindia

By Newsgram Staff Writer

The current imbroglio caused by the opposition in Parliament has now been attributed to “some people’s egos” by Prime Minister Narendra Modi while also saying that he would take the obstruction to the people’s parliament and let them decide on the contentious issue.

“People of this country will never forgive political parties for their conduct in parliament. Some people, due to their ego, did not let the parliament function. This is most unfortunate.

“I have come here to say that the Jan Sabha (people’s parliament) is bigger than the Lok Sabha. I am taking my Lok Sabha case to the Jan Sabha of people,” Prime Minister Narendra Modi said in a public rally organised in Chandigarh.

However, the four-hour-long visit during which the Prime Minister inaugurated Chandigarh airport’s new civil terminal and addressed the convocation of the Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER) itself created disruptions for the people.

Nearly 200 schools were ordered shut in Chandigarh on Friday even as the police blocked roads to ensure smooth movement of Modi’s cavalcade. Access to critical healthcare services were visibly slowed down with ambulances being directed to long detours to reach hospitals.

The main cremation ground in sector 25, located next to the ground where Modi addressed the rally on Friday afternoon, too was out of bounds for people. Cremation of loved ones could only be done at the cremation grounds in nearby Mohali and Mani Majra.

Chandigarh traffic jam
Chandigarh traffic jam     source: tribuneindia

Later, to address the aam aadmi’s grievances, Modi expressed regret over the harassment and inconvenience caused.

“The inconvenience caused to the citizens of Chandigarh, especially shutting of schools, due to my visit is regretted and was totally avoidable.

“An inquiry will be held and responsibility fixed for the inconvenience caused to the people of Chandigarh,” Modi tweeted.

On the other side, during the rally, Modi raised a wide array of issues afflicting the Indian state and urged the people to question their MP’s before voting for them.

“We are running the government to take the country forward and attain development. You have given us the clear majority to run the government. Without bothering for the 400 MP’s in Lok Sabha, 40 people (MP’s) created obstacles in the development of this country. This was an insult to the democracy in this country,” Modi said.

On the recent decision of One Rank, One Pension for ex-servicemen (OROP), Modi said credit should not be given to the government but to “the poor and common people” and added that though the amount incurred was not less, it was “small when seen in light of the sacrifices made by our soldiers”.

Shifting his attention to the health sector at the 34th convocation of the PGIMER, Modi told the medical fraternity that people were now moving from treatment of illness towards achieving wellness.

Doctors who focus on patients were more successful than those who focus on the disease. Be compassionate (to patients) as doctors. Common people consider you as gods. Address wellness and well-being, not the illness alone.

“Things are changing in our society. People want to be away from medicines. Yoga is one tool to achieve that,” Modi, the yoga propounder said.

Besides emphasising on wellness, Modi reminded doctors about the obligation to their motherland.

“Many of you must have ready passports or have applied for visa. But you have an obligation towards the poor of its country,” Modi said.

Modi made the most of the inflexion date of the convocation with the 9/11 attacks by relating death and life, both choices that we have the power to make.

“To kill is very easy, but to keep someone alive or to give life is more important. You doctors are doing that,” Modi concluded with the inspirational play of words.

Next Story

Machine Learning Can Help Doctors to Improve End-Of-Life Conversation with Patients

A deeper understanding of these conversations, which are often freighted with emotion and uncertainty, will also help reveal what aspects or behaviors associated with these conversations are more valuable for patients and families

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Machine Learning
A Research used Machine Learning algorithms to analyze 354 transcripts of palliative care conversations collected by the Palliative Care Communication Research Initiative, involving 231 patients. Pixabay

Researchers at University of Vermont have used Machine Learning and natural language processing (NLP) to better understand conversations about death, which could eventually help doctors improve their end-of-life communication.

Some of the most important, and difficult, conversations in healthcare are the ones that happen amid serious and life-threatening illnesses.

Discussions of the treatment options and prognoses in these settings are a delicate balance for doctors and nurses who are dealing with people at their most vulnerable point and may not fully understand what the future holds.

“We want to understand this complex thing called a conversation. Our major goal is to scale up the measurement of conversations so we can re-engineer the healthcare system to communicate better,” said Robert Gramling, director of the Vermont Conversation Lab in the study published in the journal Patient Education and Counselling.

Gramling and his colleagues used machine learning algorithms to analyze 354 transcripts of palliative care conversations collected by the Palliative Care Communication Research Initiative, involving 231 patients.

They broke each conversation into 10 parts with an equal number of words in each, and examined how the frequency and distribution of words referring to time, illness terminology, sentiment and words indicating possibility and desirability changed between each decile.

“We picked up some strong signals,” said Gramling.

Conversations tended to progress from talking about the past to talking about the future, and from sadder to happier sentiments. “There was quite a range, they went from pretty sad to pretty happy,” Gramling added.

Machine Learning
Researchers at University of Vermont have used Machine Learning and natural language processing (NLP) to better understand conversations about death, which could eventually help doctors improve their end-of-life communication. Pixabay

The consistent results across multiple conversations show just how much people make meaning out of stories in healthcare.

“What we found supports the importance of narrative in medicine,” he said.

That knowledge could eventually help healthcare practitioners understand what makes a “good” conversation about palliative care, and how different kinds of conversations might require different responses.
That could help create interventions that are matched to what the conversation indicates the patient needs the most.

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A deeper understanding of these conversations, which are often freighted with emotion and uncertainty, will also help reveal what aspects or behaviors associated with these conversations are more valuable for patients and families. (IANS)