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Modi Govt. to introduce aptitude certificates instead of character certificates in schools

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

New Delhi:  On Friday Prime Minister Narendra Modi revealed the government’s plans to introduce aptitude certificates in the place of character certificates in schools. In an attempt to infuse new thinking, he has also asked for professionals to volunteer and teach the students.

Fielding questions from students across the country at a programme to mark Teachers’ Day, Modi also gave insights into his own childhood — of how he would wash his clothes at a pond and iron them using a pot containing pieces of burning coal.

To a question from a child on the International Day of Yoga, held on June 21, Modi said he chose it because it is the day of the summer solstice when the sun shines longest over the northern hemisphere.

Modi said the government is trying to bring a “small change” by doing away with character certificates issued when students leave school and instead have aptitude certificates.

He said a software and a questionnaire will be developed on the child’s abilities which would be filled in by school friends, parents and the teachers.

He believes this would help to throw light on the important facets of the child and it will be easier for the student to realize what he or she wants to do in life. “The department is working on this,” he said.

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dnaindia.in

To another question, Modi said that there is a lot of talent in the country waiting to be tapped, and proposed that professionals could spend one hour a week to teach children.

“If doctors and lawyers spend time to teach children, if they spend 100 hours a year, it will infuse new life to the profession,” he said.

To another question from a student, Modi said if he had become a clerk his parents would have been equally happy, and that his parents were not in an economic condition to dream big.

The prime minister advised parents not to force their dreams on their children and instead recognize their potentials.

Asked if there was a recipe for success, Modi said that there was no recipe for success and that one should have the determination to succeed, and not be bowed down by disappointments along the way.

He also advised children to read “Pollyanna”, a best-selling 1913 novel by Eleanor H. Porter, on inculcating positive thinking.

To another question on how Digital India would work in villages without power, Modi said he has tasked officials to provide power to the 18,000 villages without power in 1,000 days.

He said solar power could also be tapped and that Digital India was for bringing good governance.

“If we have to bring good governance then we have to go towards e-governance, an empowerment movement. Digital India is to empower the common people. My dream is that in 2022, by then 24X7 power should be there in every home, I am striving for that.”

Asked what games he liked to play as a child, Modi said he played kabaddi and kho-kho, and while going to the pond to wash clothes he learnt swimming and that became a hobby.

He said he also got interested in yoga. He would also sit on the edge of cricket fields and pick up the cricket balls and hand it over.

To a question, Modi said he wants to introduce waste management in a big way in villages and towns.

To a praise from another youngster on popularizing the Modi Kurta brand, the prime minister said he has no fashion designer.

“When I was small I left home and wandered around; I had a small bag with little possessions, some books and some clothes. In Gujarat, it is not very cold, so I would wear kurta-pyjama and wash my own clothes. I thought why wear long sleeves, and I cut it and started wearing it like that.

“In my childhood, I had no means to iron clothes, so I would put burning coal in a lota and iron clothes. The idea is to live properly,” he said.

He also recounted how he would pick up used chalk pieces after school to whiten the canvas shoes gifted by a relative.

(With inputs from IANS)

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The Answer to The Impending Questions On Demonetization Are Here

While it did broaden the country’s tax base, it was a nightmare for the immense, cash-dependent informal economy.

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Indian Currency. Pixabay

Nearly all of the currency removed from circulation in a surprise 2016 attempt to root out illegal hoards of cash came back into the financial system, Resever Bank of India  has announced, indicating the move did little to slow the underground economy.

Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi’s currency decree, which was designed to destroy the value of billions of dollars in untaxed cash stockpiles, caused an economic slowdown and months of financial chaos for tens of millions of people or demonetization.

Modi announced in a November 2016 TV address that all 500-rupee and 1,000-rupee notes, then worth about $7.50 and $15, would be withdrawn immediately from circulation. The banned notes could be deposited into bank accounts but the government also said it would investigate deposits over 250,000 rupees, or about $3,700. The government eventually released new currency notes worth 500 and 2,000 rupees.

 

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An activist of Congress party hold the banned 500 and 1000 rupee notes.

 

In theory, the decree meant corrupt politicians and businesspeople would suddenly find themselves sitting on billions of dollars in worthless currency, known here as “black money.”

“A few people are spreading corruption for their own benefit,” Modi said in the surprise nighttime speech announcement of the order. “There is a time when you realize that you have to bring some change in society, and this is our time.”

But even as the decree caused turmoil for those in India who have always depended on cash — the poor and middle class, and millions of small traders — the rich found ways around the currency switch. In the months after the decree, businesspeople said that even large amounts of banned currency notes could be traded on the black market, though middlemen charged heavy fees.

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Prime Minister Narendra Modi along with mayor, flickr

The reserve bank of India report said in its Wednesday report that 99.3 percent of the $217 billion in notes withdrawn from circulation had come back into the economy. Some officials had originally predicted that number could be as low as 60 percent.

Also Read: Diverse Gathering To Be Addressed This World BioFuel Day: PM Narendra Modi

“Frankly, I think demonetization was a mistake,” said Gurcharan Das, a writer and the former head of Proctor & Gamble in India. He said that while it did broaden the country’s tax base, it was a nightmare for the immense, cash-dependent informal economy.

“You can’t overnight change that in a country which is poor and illiterate. Therefore, for me it’s not only an economic failure but a moral failure as well,” Das said. (VOA)