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Modi may become a Nixon-like statesman, says China daily

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India's PM Modi is greeted by supporters after arriving at Vancouver International Airport in Richmond

By NewsGram Staff Writer

An article in a leading state-run newspaper of China, the Global Times, linked the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to former US president Richard Nixon. The article stated that Modi’s China visit could become an ice- breaking visit, just like Nixon’s 1972 visit. The English daily also stated that Modi has the capacity to resolve the issues between the two Asian countries.

Nixon’s visit was considered an important step in normalizing relations between the US and China, as it ended 25 years of separation between the two countries. PM Modi is expected to do the same during his three-day visit to China.

“Modi is considered as a state leader with strategic insights,” the Global Times stated.

“He may become a Nixon-style statesman because of his pragmatism and capacity to resolve major contradictions between China and India and to tackle the common challenges of development,” added the China daily.

The article titled “Modi’s Nixonian pragmatism refreshes ties,” published on the second day of Modi’s three-day visit to China, praised Modi for his “strategic insights” and “pragmatism.” Interestingly, a few days ahead of the visit, the same English daily had used “pragmatism” in a negative manner to criticize Modi. The article had stated, “Ever since Modi assumed office, he has taken the initiative to actively develop India’s relationships with Japan, the US, and European countries in no time, in order to promote the country’s poor infrastructure construction and economic development. But his diplomatic moves last year have proven that he is a pragmatist, rather than a visionary.”

This latest article, written by Y A Liu Zongyi, stated, “Modi’s victory in the country’s general elections last May has injected enormous confidence into India’s economic development as well as offering hope to the US, Japan and other nations attempting to take advantage of New Delhi to contain China.”

Liu Zongyi appealed to the two Asian giants to work together in harmony in order to achieve “common development.” He referred to the boundary disputes as an enigma in the relationship between the two countries.

“The boundary disputes are a conundrum in the bilateral relationship,” said the article, while adding, “If they can’t be solved at an earlier date, the two sides should more closely stick to the code of conduct they reached before.”

The article also talked about the economic ties between India and China stating, “New Delhi also holds an ambiguous attitude toward China’s ‘One Belt, One Road’ initiative,” which refers to the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road and other regional economic cooperation plans.

“Though it joined the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) as a founding member, there are suspicions among some Indian scholars that the bank will serve as an instrument of Chinese foreign and strategic policy,” wrote Zongyi in the article.

The piece also stated that both the countries should make efforts to bridge the differences between them.

It concluded, “It is a long-term task for the two sides to establish mutual strategic trust, but political resolutions of powerful leaders will inevitably accelerate this process.”

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Asia Poised to Become a Dominant Market for Wind Energy: IRENA Report

According to the "Future of Wind" published at China Wind Power in Beijing, global wind power could rise ten-fold reaching over 6,000 GW by 2050

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Wind Energy
Low-cost renewable energy technologies like Wind Energy are readily-available today, representing the most effective and immediate solution for reducing carbon emissions. Pixabay

Asia could grow its share of installed capacity for onshore wind energy from 230 Gigawatt (GW) in 2018 to over 2,600 GW by 2050, a new report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) said on Monday.

By that time, the region would become a global leader in wind, accounting for more than 50 per cent of all onshore and over 60 per cent of all offshore wind capacity installed globally.

China would take the lead with 2,525 GW of installed onshore and offshore wind capacity by 2050 within Asia, followed by India (443 GW), Korea (78 GW) and South-East Asia (16 GW).

According to the “Future of Wind” published at China Wind Power in Beijing, global wind power could rise ten-fold reaching over 6,000 GW by 2050.

By mid-century, wind could cover one-third of global power needs and — combined with electrification — deliver a quarter of the energy-related carbon emission reductions needed to meet the Paris climate targets.

To reach this objective, onshore and offshore wind capacity will need to increase four-fold and ten-fold respectively every year compared to today.

“With renewables, it’s possible to achieve a climate-safe future,” said IRENA’s Director-General Francesco La Camera.

“Low-cost renewable energy technologies like wind power are readily-available today, representing the most effective and immediate solution for reducing carbon emissions.

Wind Energy
With renewable Wind Energy, its possible to achieve a climate-safe future. Pixabay

“Our roadmap for a global energy transformation to 2050 shows that it is technically and economically feasible to ensure a climate-safe, sustainable energy future. Unlocking global wind energy potential will be particularly important. In fact, wind energy could be the largest single source of power generation by mid-century under this path. This would not only enable us to meet climate goals, but it would also boost economic growth and create jobs, thereby accelerating sustainable development,” added Camera.

The global wind industry could become a veritable job motor, employing over 3.7 million people by 2030 and more than six million people by 2050, IRENA’s report finds.

These figures are respectively nearly three times higher and five times higher than the slightly over one million jobs in 2018.

Sound industrial and labour policies that build upon and strengthen domestic supply chains can enable income and employment growth by leveraging existing economic activities in support of wind industry development.

But to accelerate the growth of global wind power over the coming decades, scaling up investments will be key.

On average, global annual investment in onshore wind must increase from today $67 billion to $211 billion in 2050.

Wind Energy
To accelerate the growth of global Wind Energy over the coming decades, scaling up investments will be key. Pixabay

For offshore wind, global average annual investments would need to increase from $19 billion to $100 billion in 2050.

Asia would account for more than 50 per cent of global onshore wind power installations by 2050, followed by North America (23 per cent) and Europe (10 per cent).

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For offshore, Asia would cover more than 60 per cent of global installations, followed by Europe (22 per cent) and North America (16 per cent). (IANS)