Friday December 14, 2018
Home Politics Modi may beco...

Modi may become a Nixon-like statesman, says China daily

0
//
Republish
Reprint

India's PM Modi is greeted by supporters after arriving at Vancouver International Airport in Richmond

By NewsGram Staff Writer

An article in a leading state-run newspaper of China, the Global Times, linked the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to former US president Richard Nixon. The article stated that Modi’s China visit could become an ice- breaking visit, just like Nixon’s 1972 visit. The English daily also stated that Modi has the capacity to resolve the issues between the two Asian countries.

Nixon’s visit was considered an important step in normalizing relations between the US and China, as it ended 25 years of separation between the two countries. PM Modi is expected to do the same during his three-day visit to China.

“Modi is considered as a state leader with strategic insights,” the Global Times stated.

“He may become a Nixon-style statesman because of his pragmatism and capacity to resolve major contradictions between China and India and to tackle the common challenges of development,” added the China daily.

The article titled “Modi’s Nixonian pragmatism refreshes ties,” published on the second day of Modi’s three-day visit to China, praised Modi for his “strategic insights” and “pragmatism.” Interestingly, a few days ahead of the visit, the same English daily had used “pragmatism” in a negative manner to criticize Modi. The article had stated, “Ever since Modi assumed office, he has taken the initiative to actively develop India’s relationships with Japan, the US, and European countries in no time, in order to promote the country’s poor infrastructure construction and economic development. But his diplomatic moves last year have proven that he is a pragmatist, rather than a visionary.”

This latest article, written by Y A Liu Zongyi, stated, “Modi’s victory in the country’s general elections last May has injected enormous confidence into India’s economic development as well as offering hope to the US, Japan and other nations attempting to take advantage of New Delhi to contain China.”

Liu Zongyi appealed to the two Asian giants to work together in harmony in order to achieve “common development.” He referred to the boundary disputes as an enigma in the relationship between the two countries.

“The boundary disputes are a conundrum in the bilateral relationship,” said the article, while adding, “If they can’t be solved at an earlier date, the two sides should more closely stick to the code of conduct they reached before.”

The article also talked about the economic ties between India and China stating, “New Delhi also holds an ambiguous attitude toward China’s ‘One Belt, One Road’ initiative,” which refers to the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road and other regional economic cooperation plans.

“Though it joined the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) as a founding member, there are suspicions among some Indian scholars that the bank will serve as an instrument of Chinese foreign and strategic policy,” wrote Zongyi in the article.

The piece also stated that both the countries should make efforts to bridge the differences between them.

It concluded, “It is a long-term task for the two sides to establish mutual strategic trust, but political resolutions of powerful leaders will inevitably accelerate this process.”

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

China, US Set To Take Action Against Each Other

US business executives are now bracing for further retaliation from China due to Meng's arrest

0
USA, China,
President Donald Trump with China's President Xi Jinping during their bilateral meeting, Dec. 1, 2018 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. VOA

China and the US are set to take action against each other as tensions escalate over trade, cyber hacking and espionage as senior American law enforcement officials identified Beijing as the most serious threat to Washington’s national security, officials said.

China’s methods of non-traditional espionage, including their use of ordinary Chinese expatriates instead of spies at universities and businesses, and intellectual property theft, were explained by the officials from the FBI and Departments of Justice and Homeland Security who briefed US lawmakers on Wednesday, CNN reported.

“As the US proceeds a whole of society response to this threat, we must address the vulnerabilities within our system while preserving our values and the open, free and fair principles that have made us thrive,” E.W. Priestap, the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Assistant Director of Counter-intelligence told the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“What hangs in the balance is not just the future of the US, but the future of the world.”

The Department of Justice’s (DOJ) top national security official told lawmakers on Wednesday the administration was reacting to China’s “steadily increasing” economic espionage activity, which costs the US an estimated $225 billion a year.

From 2011 to 2018, more than 90 per cent of the DOJ’s cases alleging economic espionage by a state have involved China, and more than two-thirds of trade secret thefts have a nexus to China, Assistant Attorney General John Demers said.

Donald Trump, democrats, government,, pakistan
U.S. President Donald Trump. VOA

“From underwater drones and autonomous vehicles to critical chemical compounds and inbred corn seeds, China has targeted advanced technology across sectors that align with China’s publicly announced strategic goals,” Demers said. “The play book is simple: rob, replicate and replace.”

Priestap and his colleagues testified hours after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo confirmed in an interview with Fox News that the US believes Beijing was behind the massive cyber-attack on the Marriott hotel chain, CNN reported.

The New York Times reported on Tuesday that the assault was part of a broader Chinese operation that also targeted health insurers and the security clearance files of millions of Americans.

Also Read- Bug Spotted in Microsoft Office 365, Outlook

Those disclosures came a day after President Donald Trump said that he would be willing to use Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Meng Wanzhou who was arrested in Canada for violating US sanctions on Iran as a bargaining chip in his trade war with Beijing, which for now is in a 90-day pause.

A Canadian judge on Tuesday night granted Meng a $7.5 million bail, while she awaits extradition to the US.

US business executives are now bracing for further retaliation from China due to Meng’s arrest. (IANS)