Wednesday August 15, 2018

Study: Having More Friends can Improve Brain Health

Our research suggests that merely having a larger social network can positively influence the ageing brain

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Study: Having More Friends can Improve Brain Health
Study: Having More Friends can Improve Brain Health. Pixabay
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Having more friends and strong social connections may slow brain ageing, preserve the mind and improve the quality of life, new research suggests.

According to the study, brain function in the hippocampus–brain area associated with memory, emotions and motivation–markedly declines with age, even in the absence of dementia. Exercise and social ties are known to preserve memory in this region in people.

“Our research suggests that merely having a larger social network can positively influence the ageing brain,” said lead researcher Elizabeth Kirby from the Neurological Institute at Ohio State University-Columbus, the US.

In the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, the team studied two groups of mice aged between 15-18 months for three months, when their natural memory declines.

While one group lived in pairs, which Kirby refers to as the “old-couple model”, the other group lived with six other roommates, a scenario that allowed for “complex interactions”.

Their memory was tested by making the mice recognise a toy, such as a plastic car which had been moved to a new location.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

The results showed that mice who were living in a group had better brain health and memory.

“With the pair-housed mice, they had no idea that the object had moved. The group-housed mice were much better at remembering what they’d seen before and went to the toy in a new location, ignoring another toy that had not moved,” Kirby said.

Further, examining the brain tissue of the mice showed increased inflammation in the pair-housed mice–a biological evidence of eroded cognitive health.

“The group-housed mice had fewer signs of this inflammation, meaning that their brains didn’t look as ‘old’ as those that lived in pairs,” Kirby said.

Future research should explore the molecular explanations for the connection between socialisation and improved memory and brain health, she noted. (IANS)

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Key To A Good Chemistry On-Screen Is Being Friends First, Sunny Leone

Sunny will be seen co-hosting the show with Rannvijay Singha, who she calls her "Rakhi brother"

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Sunny Leone set to co-host 'Spiltsvilla:11'. Flickr
Sunny Leone set to co-host 'Spiltsvilla:11'. Flickr

Actress Sunny Leone says the ability to be good friends at first is the key to a sparkling chemistry in a relationship.

On how to achieve good chemistry in a relationship, Sunny told IANS over email from Los Angeles: “It is honesty and the ability to be friends first.”

The actress, who is married to Daniel Weber, will be seen hosting the 11th season of “Splitsvilla”, with the theme ‘Emotions vs Science’ on MTV.

Sunny Leone And Rannvijay Singh Set To Host Another Season Of Splitsvila. Flickr
Sunny Leone And Rannvijay Singh Set To Host Another Season Of Splitsvila. Flickr

“I love that I have been working on this show for the past five years. It’s a time I look forward to every year because it’s so much fun… This year I believe we have a great looking bunch of contestants and they are all very talented and outgoing. They are so entertaining,” she said.

Sunny will be seen co-hosting the show with Rannvijay Singha, who she calls her “Rakhi brother”.

Also Read:Sunny Leone to Feature in A Canadian Producer’s Music Video

“We have so much fun together laughing. I love his family and this year was especially tough for me because I got very ill during shooting and he helped me out so much, keeping an eye on my children as I was hospitalised for a night. They really love being around him and he is a great ‘little big brother’,” she said. (IANS)