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Survey: More Than Half of the Indians Believe Smart Devices Record Personal Information without their Knowledge

"Cyber terrorism (53 per cent) is the second-biggest fear," the company said in a statement

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personal information, smart devices
While 85 per cent of people own a smartphone, 54 per cent believe the technology is spying on them. Pixabay

As many as 52 per cent or more than half of the Indians believe their smart devices record personal information without their knowledge, a survey by YouGov said on Tuesday.

YouGov — an Internet-based market research and data analytics firm — stated that the most commonly used devices are also the ones people are most likely to think are monitoring them.

“People have concerns about their online privacy and losing private data (such as photos, mails, financial information) is people’s biggest tech-related fear (with 55 per cent saying it).

smart devices, personal information
“Cyber terrorism (53 per cent) is the second-biggest fear,” the company said in a statement. Pixabay

ALSO READ: India Sold Over 204 mn WiFi Devices in 2018: Report

“Cyber terrorism (53 per cent) is the second-biggest fear,” the company said in a statement. While 85 per cent of people own a smartphone, 54 per cent believe the technology is spying on them.

According to the survey, around a third fear that with the rapid advancement of technology either they would be socially isolated (34 per cent), human interactions would be replaced by Artificial Intelligence (34 per cent) or there would be excessive dependence on technology (32 per cent). (IANS)

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Spotify Leaking Personal Information of Users: Report

The Swedish app that came to India earlier this year was yet to comment on the matter

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Spotify Music still leads outside of the US, tallying 75 million subscribers as part of its first earnings report in May.
Spotify Music still leads outside of the US, tallying 75 million subscribers as part of its first earnings report in May. Pixabay

Swedish music streaming giant Spotify is reportedly leaking personal information of users who pre-save music on the app with content labels.

According to a billboard.com report, users who “pre-save” an upcoming release on their accounts may be sharing more personal data with the act’s label than they know.

Music labels on the music streaming app sometimes ask for permission to track user information about their accounts and listening habits, email addresses, recent play history, abilities to manage add and remove library items and create playlists.

This, despite being legal, raises questions on Spotify’s transpency and security.

“Spotify users who, for example, tried to pre-save the Little Mix single ‘Bounce Back’ from links shared by the act or its label — Sony Music, were prompted to agree that Spotify could allow Sony to ‘view your Spotify account data’, ‘view your activity on Spotify’ and ‘take actions in Spotify on your behalf’,” claimed the report on Thursday.

spotify, testing, first, hardware
Spotify is testing it’s new feature. Pixabay

To let users pre-save upcoming albums, labels do need a certain amount of access to user accounts, but the music ctreaming giant has made it difficult to see the extent of permissions that labels ask for.

In addition, the company has not even taken actions to restrict the kind of information third parties can request from users — or what they can potentially do with it.

The Swedish app that came to India earlier this year was yet to comment on the matter.

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It is pertinent to note that Spotify’s rival Apple Music does not share any identifying information on subscribers keeping in line with its approach to user privacy.

Earlier in April, Spotify crossed the 100 million global premium users mark and announced that the service reached the milestone by growing paid subscribers by 32-percent year-on-year. Including the free subscribers, the app has a total of 217 million monthly active users worldwide. (IANS)