Saturday December 14, 2019

Study: Morning sickness during pregnancy protects baby in the womb, lowers risk of miscarriage

The cause of the morning sickness is not known, but the recent study revealed that it protects the foetus against toxins and various disease-causing organisms in foods and beverages

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Representational Image. Pixabay

New York, Sep 27 : During pregnancy, nausea, and vomiting or the “morning sickness” which occurs is associated with a lower risk of miscarriage, a study has found.

Morning sickness is something which typically begins in the morning and resolves as the day progresses. For most of the women, nausea and vomiting subside by the fourth month of pregnancy. Some may have these symptoms for the entire period of pregnancy till delivery.

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The cause of the morning sickness is not known, but the recent study revealed that it protects the foetus against toxins and various disease-causing organisms in foods and beverages.

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“Our study evaluates symptoms from the earliest weeks of pregnancy, immediately after conception, and confirms that there is a protective association between nausea and vomiting and a lower risk of pregnancy loss,” said Stefanie N. Hinkle, lead author and scientist at NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) — a public health research organization in Maryland, US.

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The team analyzed a total of 797 women who had tested positive for pregnancy, with 188 ending in miscarriage.

By the eighth week of pregnancy, 57.3 percent of the women reported of experiencing nausea and 26.6 percent reported nausea along with vomiting.

After analyzing, the researchers found that the women experiencing ‘morning sickness’ were 50 to 75 percent less likely to have pregnancy loss as compared to those who had not experienced it.

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The study, appearing in JAMA Internal Medicine, was conducted by researchers at and other institutions.

– prepared by NewsGram team with inputs from IANS. Twitter: @PinazKazi

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    This just goes to show in a weird way that there’s reason for all suffering after all!

Next Story

Morning Sickness Can Increase Autism Risk in Children: Study

Awareness of an association may create the opportunity for earlier diagnosis and intervention in children at risk of autism

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Children
For the study published in the American Journal of Perinatology, researchers reviewed the electronic health records of nearly 500,000 pregnant women and their Children born between 1991-2014 in Southern California. Pixabay

Children whose mothers had hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of morning sickness, during pregnancy were 53 per cent more likely to be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, a study said.

Hyperemesis gravidarum occurs in less than five per cent of pregnancies. Affected women experience intense nausea and are unable to keep down food and fluids.

This could lead to dangerous dehydration and inadequate nutrition during pregnancy.

“This study is important because it suggests that children born to women with hyperemesis may be at an increased risk of autism,” said the study’s lead author Darios Getahun, Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research and Evaluation.

“Awareness of this association may create the opportunity for earlier diagnosis and intervention in children at risk of autism,” Getahun said,

For the study published in the American Journal of Perinatology, researchers reviewed the electronic health records of nearly 500,000 pregnant women and their Children born between 1991-2014 in Southern California.

They compared children whose mothers had a diagnosis of hyperemesis gravidarum during pregnancy to those whose mothers did not.

Children
Children whose mothers had hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of morning sickness, during pregnancy were 53 per cent more likely to be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, a study said. Pixabay

The researchers found that exposure to hyperemesis gravidarum was associated with increased risk of autism when the disease was diagnosed during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy, but not when it was diagnosed only in the third trimester.

Exposure to the disease was associated with the risk of autism regardless of the severity of the mother’s hyperemesis gravidarum, the study said.

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The results are consistent with the hypothesis that women experiencing hyperemesis gravidarum have a poor nutritional intake, which might, in turn lead to potential long-term neurodevelopment impairment in their children. (IANS)