Saturday November 16, 2019
Home Lead Story Study Shows, ...

Study Shows, Dogs of 8 Weeks of Age are Found Most Attractive by Humans

Dogs occupy a special place in our hearts, but there is a time when we find man's best friend most attractive -- at roughly eight weeks, the same point in time at which their mother weans them and leaves them to fend for themselves, a study says.

0
//
The results showed that the pups' attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.
Representational Image. pixabay

Dogs occupy a special place in our hearts, but there is a time when we find man’s best friend most attractive — at roughly eight weeks, the same point in time at which their mother weans them and leaves them to fend for themselves, a study says.

The researchers wanted to find out if there was a connection between pups’ weaning age — when they are at their most vulnerable — and their level of attractiveness to humans.

“There is indeed an optimal age of maximum cuteness, and that age does line up pretty closely with the age at which mothers wean their pups,” said lead researcher Clive Wynne, Professor at Arizona State University in the US.

 

The study was carried out using a series of photographs of puppies at different ages, from the first weeks of life through young adulthood.
representational image. pixabay

 

The researchers believe that the findings, published in Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of the Interactions of People and Animals, could provide insight into the depth and origin of the relationship between humans and dogs.

The study was carried out using a series of photographs of puppies at different ages, from the first weeks of life through young adulthood.

The participants were asked to rank the puppies’ level of attractiveness in each photo. Three distinctive looking breeds were ranked — Jack Russell terriers, cane corsos and white shepherds.

The study was carried out using a series of photographs of puppies at different ages, from the first weeks of life through young adulthood.
Dog Owner. Pixabay

Also Read: Taking Your Dog For A Walk Can Help Older Adults Live Longer

The results showed that the pups’ attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.

“Around seven or eight weeks of age, just as their mother is getting sick of them and is going to kick them out of the den and they’re going to have to make their own way in life, at that age, that is exactly when they are most attractive to human beings,” Wynne said. (IANS)

Next Story

Want To Know If Your Dog Is Happy Or Not? Find It Out Here

Your experience will help you find out about how your dog feels

0
dog
If you know when your dog is sad or happy, the credit goes to your experience. Pixabay

If you know when your dog is sad or happy, the credit goes to your experience and learning, not an innate ability to read the facial expression of your “best friend”, suggests new research.

While some dog emotions can be recognised from early on, the ability to reliably recognise dog emotions is mainly acquired through age and experience, said the study.

The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, showed that the probability of recognising dog emotions was higher for participants who grew up in a cultural context with a positive attitude towards dogs, regardless of whether they owned a dog themselves.

“These results are noteworthy, because they suggest that it is not necessarily direct experience with dogs that affects humans’ ability to recognise their emotions, but rather the cultural milieu in which humans develop,” said study lead author Federica Amici from the Max Planck Institute in Germany.

In order to test how well humans can understand the emotions behind dog facial expressions, the researchers collected photographs of dogs, chimpanzees, and humans displaying either happy, sad, angry, neutral, or fearful emotions as substantiated by the photographers.

They then recruited 89 adult participants and 77 child participants and categorised them according to their age, the dog-positivity of their cultural context and the participants’ personal history of dog ownership.

Each participant was presented with photographs of dogs, chimps and humans and asked to rate how much the individual in the picture displayed happiness, sadness, anger, or fear.

Adults were also asked to determine the context in which the picture had been taken (e.g., playing with a trusted conspecific partner; directly before attacking a conspecific).

dog
A test was conducted to know how well humans can understand the emotions behind dog facial expressions. Pixabay

The results of the study showed that, while some dog emotions can be recognised from early on, the ability to reliably recognise dog emotions is mainly acquired through age and experience.

In adults, the probability of recognising dog emotions was higher for participants who grew up in a cultural context with a positive attitude towards dogs, regardless of whether they owned a dog themselves.

A dog-positive cultural background, one in which dogs are closely integrated into human life and considered highly important, may result in a higher level of passive exposure and increased inclination and interest in dogs, making humans better at recognising dogs’ emotions even without a history of personal dog ownership.

The researchers also found that regardless of age or experience with dogs, all participants were able to identify anger and happiness reliably.

Also Read- Anxiety Among Teenagers Leads To Harmful Drinking

While these results may suggest an innate ability favoured by the co-domestication hypothesis, it is also possible that humans learn to recognise these emotions quickly, even with limited exposure.

Other than anger and happiness,the children in the study were not good at identifying dog emotions, the study said. (IANS)