Saturday February 24, 2018

“Most obese people likely to stay fat” : Study

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London: Casting aspersions on the effectiveness of current weight management programmes focused on dieting and exercise, it has been found that chances of obese people recovering normal body weight are very slim, shows research. 3829063385_8e46d16540_o

The chance of an obese person attaining normal body weight is one in 210 for men and one in 124 for women, increasing to one in 1,290 for men and one in 677 for women with severe obesity, the findings showed.

“Once an adult becomes obese, it is very unlikely that they will return to a healthy body weight,” said study’s first author Alison Fildes from the University College London.

The findings suggest that current weight management programmes focused on dieting and exercise are not effective in tackling obesity at population level.

The research tracked the weight of 278,982 participants (129,194 men and 149,788) women using electronic health records from 2004 to 2014.

The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, looked at the probability of obese patients attaining normal weight or a five percent reduction in body weight. Patients who received bariatric surgery were excluded from the study.

The annual chance of obese patients achieving five percent weight loss was one in 12 for men and one in 10 for women.

For those people who achieved five percent weight loss, 53 percent regained this weight within two years and 78 percent had regained the weight within five years.

Overall, only 1,283 men and 2,245 women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30-35 reached their normal body weight, equivalent to an annual probability of one in 210 for men and one in 124 for women.

For those with a BMI above 40, the odds increased to one in 1,290 for men and one in 677 for women with severe obesity.

Weight cycling, with both increases and decreases in body weight, was also observed in more than a third of patients.

“This evidence suggests the current system is not working for the vast majority of obese patients,” Fildes said.

(IANS)

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Combat obesity with your body’s built-in weighing scale

The system, which regulates weight gain by calculating body weight and fat mass, can help understanding the causes of obesity and ca facilitate new anti-obesity drugs.

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Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
  • Human body’s natural weighing scales can now help cure obesity.
  • The study of these scales can help us understand the reasons and cures for obesity.

Human body consists of an internal body weight sensing system that operates like bathroom scales, registering body weight and signalling the brain to reduce food intake, researchers have found.

The system, which regulates weight gain by calculating body weight and fat mass, could lead to a better understanding of the causes of obesity as well as new anti-obesity drugs.

The results also explain why several studies have coupled sitting habit with obesity and bad health. It is because the “internal body scales give an inaccurately low measure when you sit down. As a result you eat more and gain weight,” the researchers said.

Sitting has been closely associated by the researchers, as a cause of obesity,
Sitting has been closely associated by the researchers, as a cause of obesity,

“We have found support for the existence of internal bathroom scales. The weight of the body is registered in the lower extremities. If the body weight tends to increase, a signal is sent to the brain to decrease food intake and keep the body weight constant,” said John-Olov Jansson, Professor at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

Further, the results demonstrate that the weight sensing system regulates fat mass independently of leptin — a weight loss hormone. It is possible that leptin combined with activation of the internal body scales can become an effective treatment for obesity, the researchers said.

For the study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the team performed experiments on obese rodents that were made artificially heavier by loading with extra weights.

The animals lost almost as much weight as the artificial load. The extra weights caused body fat to decrease and blood glucose levels to improve. IANS

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