Tuesday February 19, 2019

“Most obese people likely to stay fat” : Study

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London: Casting aspersions on the effectiveness of current weight management programmes focused on dieting and exercise, it has been found that chances of obese people recovering normal body weight are very slim, shows research. 3829063385_8e46d16540_o

The chance of an obese person attaining normal body weight is one in 210 for men and one in 124 for women, increasing to one in 1,290 for men and one in 677 for women with severe obesity, the findings showed.

“Once an adult becomes obese, it is very unlikely that they will return to a healthy body weight,” said study’s first author Alison Fildes from the University College London.

The findings suggest that current weight management programmes focused on dieting and exercise are not effective in tackling obesity at population level.

The research tracked the weight of 278,982 participants (129,194 men and 149,788) women using electronic health records from 2004 to 2014.

The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, looked at the probability of obese patients attaining normal weight or a five percent reduction in body weight. Patients who received bariatric surgery were excluded from the study.

The annual chance of obese patients achieving five percent weight loss was one in 12 for men and one in 10 for women.

For those people who achieved five percent weight loss, 53 percent regained this weight within two years and 78 percent had regained the weight within five years.

Overall, only 1,283 men and 2,245 women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30-35 reached their normal body weight, equivalent to an annual probability of one in 210 for men and one in 124 for women.

For those with a BMI above 40, the odds increased to one in 1,290 for men and one in 677 for women with severe obesity.

Weight cycling, with both increases and decreases in body weight, was also observed in more than a third of patients.

“This evidence suggests the current system is not working for the vast majority of obese patients,” Fildes said.

(IANS)

Next Story

As Per Study, High-Risk HPV Lead to Increased CVD

For the study, researchers included 63,411 women aged 30 or older without CVD.

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Obesity leads to high CVB in women.
women with obesity were nearly two-thirds more likely to develop CVD. Pixabay

While human papillomavirus (HPV) have been linked to cancer, infection with high-risk strains of the virus might also increase the fear of cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular problems, according to a new research.

Certain strains of HPV are considered high risk because they can increase the probability of vaginal, vulvar, penile, mouth, throat and cervical cancers.

The study showed that women with high-risk HPV were 22 per cent more likely than uninfected women to develop cardiovascular disease.

High risk HPV contributes to CVD problems.
HPV are considered high risk as they develop CVD disease. Pixabay

In addition, women with obesity were nearly two-thirds more likely to develop CVD and those with metabolic syndrome and high-risk HPV were nearly twice as likely to develop the disorder, showed results published in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Conversely, slightly more than 7 per cent of the women without CVD developed high-risk HPV infections.

Interestingly, women who smoked, consumed alcohol and reported being physically active were also more likely to have high-risk HPV. In contrast, higher education – college degree or more – was associated with a decreased likelihood of having high-risk HPV.

 

Fear of increased CVD disease is higher in obese women.
Women with obesity faces higher chances of CVD disease. Pixabay

“A better understanding of high-risk HPV as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and possible combined effects of high-risk HPV, obesity and metabolic syndrome in increasing cardiovascular disease risk may help improve preventive strategies and patient outcomes,” said Seungho Ryu, Professor at Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea.

Further studies are required to identify specific high-risk HPV genotypes that may contribute to cardiovascular disease and to examine whether vaccine strategies to reduce high-risk HPV infection for cancer prevention may also help reduce CVD, suggested the study.

ALSO READ: Keep Obesity At Bay With Flaxseeds

For the study, researchers included 63,411 women aged 30 or older without CVD. (IANS)