Monday May 21, 2018

“Most obese people likely to stay fat” : Study

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London: Casting aspersions on the effectiveness of current weight management programmes focused on dieting and exercise, it has been found that chances of obese people recovering normal body weight are very slim, shows research. 3829063385_8e46d16540_o

The chance of an obese person attaining normal body weight is one in 210 for men and one in 124 for women, increasing to one in 1,290 for men and one in 677 for women with severe obesity, the findings showed.

“Once an adult becomes obese, it is very unlikely that they will return to a healthy body weight,” said study’s first author Alison Fildes from the University College London.

The findings suggest that current weight management programmes focused on dieting and exercise are not effective in tackling obesity at population level.

The research tracked the weight of 278,982 participants (129,194 men and 149,788) women using electronic health records from 2004 to 2014.

The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, looked at the probability of obese patients attaining normal weight or a five percent reduction in body weight. Patients who received bariatric surgery were excluded from the study.

The annual chance of obese patients achieving five percent weight loss was one in 12 for men and one in 10 for women.

For those people who achieved five percent weight loss, 53 percent regained this weight within two years and 78 percent had regained the weight within five years.

Overall, only 1,283 men and 2,245 women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30-35 reached their normal body weight, equivalent to an annual probability of one in 210 for men and one in 124 for women.

For those with a BMI above 40, the odds increased to one in 1,290 for men and one in 677 for women with severe obesity.

Weight cycling, with both increases and decreases in body weight, was also observed in more than a third of patients.

“This evidence suggests the current system is not working for the vast majority of obese patients,” Fildes said.

(IANS)

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Exercise May Help Beat Genetic Predisposition to Obesity in Elderly Women

Ladies, stop blaming genes for your larger waistline as you can overcome the genetic predisposition to obesity through exercise, a new study suggests.

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The researchers describe 'Ankrd16' as
Old Woman. pixabay

Ladies, stop blaming genes for your larger waistline as you can overcome the genetic predisposition to obesity through exercise, a new study suggests.

The study found that physical activity reduces the influence of genetic predisposition to obesity, and this effect is more significant in the oldest age group — women aged 70 years and older.

These findings additionally support guidelines for promoting and maintaining healthy behaviours, especially in older adults, to maximize quality and longevity of life, the researcher said.

The researchers found that greater symptoms of depression were linked to worse episodic memory -- a person's ability to remember specific experiences and events.
representational image. pixabay

“We are born with our genes, but this study suggests that we can improve our lives and health with exercise, regardless of genetics,” said Joann Pinkerton, executive director at the North American Menopause Society in the US.

“As women age, exercise has been shown to improve muscle mass, balance and bone strength. It also invigorates brain cells, is associated with less arthritic pain, and improves mood, concentration, and cognition”, Pinkerton added.

The researchers also mentioned that regardless of age, genes, and amount of abdominal fat or body mass index (BMI), regular exercise can improve health.

Also Read: New Study Shows That Elderly With Symptoms of Depression Are More Prone to Memory Problems

For the study, published in the journal Menopause, the researchers analysed more than 8,200 women.

The previous studies have suggested that the genetic influence on BMI increases from childhood to early adulthood, the researcher said. (IANS)

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