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Most Women in High-ranking Positions raised in similar Family Environment, says Study

In the future, there will be no female leaders. There will be just leaders - Sheryl Sandberg

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, accompanied by first lady Michelle Obama, greet supporters during a campaign rally in Winston-Salem, N.C., Oct. 27, 2016. Researcher Susan Madsen says there are striking similarities among powerful women across the globe. VOA
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November 1, 2016 : A victory by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton next month would add one more name to the list of the fewer than two dozen female heads of state and prime ministers in the world. But the number of women in high-ranking positions — ministers, governors, parliament members and CEOs — is growing.

And despite the different cultural and political backgrounds among those powerful women, there are striking similarities among them, according to researcher Susan Madsen, who studies the development of prominent female leaders in the United States and other countries.

“I’ve done very in-depth interviews with some women leaders in Eastern and Central Europe, China and also in the Middle East,” said Madsen, at professor at Utah Valley University in Utah. “I’ve got very interesting similarities, actually, with all the women.”

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Politics at the dinner table

Female leaders are raised in a similar family environment, according to Madsen.

Susan Madsen, who teaches at Utah Valley University, says women's approach to leadership is different than men's. "Generally speaking, women are just more collaborative," she said.
Susan Madsen, who teaches at Utah Valley University, says women’s approach to leadership is different than men’s. “Generally speaking, women are just more collaborative,” she said. VOA

Susan Madsen, who teaches at Utah Valley University, says women’s approach to leadership is different than men’s. “Generally speaking, women are just more collaborative,” she said.

“The dinner table conversation was when many of these women found their voices,” Madsen said. “Their fathers encouraged them to talk about the issues, around what was happening in the town, whether it was politics, or issues in schools. They actually were able to really have good conversations where the children were not hushed, where the children were asked to share their opinions.”

They were also encouraged to listen thoughtfully to others.

“Either mothers or teachers or whatever helped them learn to reflect more effectively than a lot of other people,” she explained. “If you don’t know how to reflect well and learn from your mistakes, you’re just not going to progress and be a strong leader. [I] also found that all of the women actually were avid readers, and their parents encouraged them to read and learn.”

In addition, Madsen found that most prominent female leaders used to play team sports.

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“It’s actually quite amazing how much you can learn from team sports, including helping women and girls understand how to lose and be OK with that — know that you have to get up and try the next time, and how to work with the team,” she said. “The research says that women in the workplace sometimes are not good at supporting each other. They actually will cut each other down, but team sports actually help you develop positive relationships with other women and build them up.”

Distinctly female leadership style

Madsen, who teaches management classes, also serves as a director for several women’s advocacy organizations, including the Utah Women and Education Initiative and the Utah Women and Leadership Project.

She noted that women’s approach to leadership is different than men’s.

FILE - Young women listen to first lady Michelle Obama speak during a campaign rally for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Manchester, N.H., Oct. 13, 2016. Researcher Susan Madsen says women who have risen to positions of power have a common responsibility: leading by example, and inspiring the next generation of female leaders.
Young women listen to first lady Michelle Obama speak during a campaign rally for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Manchester, N.H., Oct. 13, 2016. Researcher Susan Madsen says women who have risen to positions of power have a common responsibility: leading by example, and inspiring the next generation of female leaders. VOA

FILE – Young women listen to first lady Michelle Obama speak during a campaign rally for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Manchester, N.H., Oct. 13, 2016. Researcher Susan Madsen says women who have risen to positions of power have a common responsibility: leading by example, and inspiring the next generation of female leaders.

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“Generally speaking, women are just more collaborative,” she said. “They really listen better. Research has shown women actually observe nonverbal behaviors better than men. They see more subtle things that are happening and can adjust and adapt, and really bring other people into the conversations.

“Women ask different questions and talk about different things. So women in politics … we will bring up and have our voices on different issues than men. Those issues are things like education — and this is not just in the U.S. — health care, child care, family issues, social programs [and] homelessness. We still bring up, as women, other issues, but we tend to bring up some of those issues that really represent the society.”

Lessons from challenges, mistakes

But there are common obstacles that often keep women from playing a more prominent role in their societies, Madsen says.

“It doesn’t matter the country, it doesn’t matter the income level or cultures — different studies say women have less confidence than men,” Madsen said. “Also, women don’t aspire generally, as much as men, to be leaders. That comes from girls and women not seeing women as leaders. The social norm is that men should be leaders more than women, just because that’s how it’s been done for years.

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“Perfectionism in women can be a barrier, as well,” she added. “If a man has 50 to 60 percent of the knowledge and skills, he’ll put up that application, he’ll file to run. With women, the research says, it’s about 90 to 100 percent — that a woman wouldn’t apply for a job or file for public office unless she’s almost perfect.”

To change that mindset, Madsen says, societies have to remove some of the hurdles that stand in the way of female empowerment.

“We have to help girls and women understand the importance of becoming a leader,” she explained. “We’ve got to teach them that they actually can be leaders and they actually should be leaders.

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“We’ve got to provide girls and women more with experiences that will increase their aspiration to be leaders, so they can see they can lead in situations to help people around them. We need to help them understand how to network, and provide them with more mentoring opportunities.”

Madsen says women who have risen to positions of power have yet another common responsibility: leading by example, to inspire the next generation of female leaders to do the same. (VOA)

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FIFA World Cup 2018: Indian Cuisine becomes the most sought after in Moscow

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Indian cuisine in FIFA World cup
Indian dishes available in Moscow during FIFA World Cup 2018, representational image, wikimedia commons

June 17, 2018:

Restaurateurs Prodyut and Sumana Mukherjee have not only brought Indian cuisine to the ongoing FIFA World Cup 2018 here but also plan to dish out free dinner to countrymen if Argentina wins the trophy on July 15.

Based in Moscow for the last 27 years, Prodyut and Sumana run two Indian eateries, “Talk Of The Town” and “Fusion Plaza”.

You may like to read more on Indian cuisine: Indian ‘masala’, among other condiments spicing up global food palate.

Both restaurants serve popular Indian dishes like butter chicken, kebabs and a varied vegetarian spread.

During the ongoing FIFA World Cup 2018, there will be 25 per cent discount for those who will possess a Fan ID (required to watch World Cup games).

There will also be gifts and contests on offers during matches in both the restaurants to celebrate the event.

The Mukherjees, hailing from Kolkata, are die-hard fans of Argentina. Despite Albiceleste drawing 1-1 with Iceland in their group opener with Lionel Messi failing to sparkle, they believe Jorge Sampaoli’s team can go the distance.

“I am an Argentina fan. I have booked tickets for a quarterfinal match, a semifinal and of course the final. If Argentina goes on to lift

During the World Cup, there will be 25 per cent discount for those who will possess a Fan ID (required to watch World Cup games).

There will also be gifts and contests on offers during matches in both the restaurants to celebrate the event.

FIFA World Cup 2018 Russia
FIFA World Cup 2018, Wikimedia Commons.

“We have been waiting for this World Cup. Indians come in large numbers during the World Cup and we wanted these eateries to be a melting point,” he added.

According to Cutting Edge Events, FIFA’s official sales agency in India for the 2018 World Cup, India is amongst the top 10 countries in terms of number of match tickets bought.

Read more about Indian cuisine abroad: Hindoostane Coffee House: London’s First Indian Restaurant.

Prodyut came to Moscow to study engineering and later started working for a pharmaceutical company here before trying his hand in business. Besides running the two restaurants with the help of his wife, he was into the distribution of pharmaceutical products.

“After Russia won the first match of the World Cup, the footfall has gone up considerably. The Indians are also flooding in after the 6-9 p.m. game. That is the time both my restaurants remain full,” Prodyut said.

There are also plans to rope in registered fan clubs of Latin American countries, who will throng the restaurants during matches and then follow it up with after-game parties till the wee hours.

“I did get in touch with some of the fan clubs I had prior idea about. They agreed to come over and celebrate the games at our joints. Those will be gala nights when both eateries will remain open all night for them to enjoy,” Prodyut said.

Watching the World Cup is a dream come true for the couple, Sumana said.

“We want to make the Indians who have come here to witness the spectacle and feel at home too. We always extend a helping hand and since we are from West Bengal, we make special dishes for those who come from Bengal,” she added. (IANS)