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Motivational quotes which will give you your lost motivation back

Motivational quotes may seem vague or even useless to some, but they are not. We all need a little inspiration and motivation in our lives. Always remember, pen is mightier than sword.

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Motivational quotes are a great way of getting the lost motivation back. Pixabay
Motivational quotes are a great way of getting the lost motivation back. Pixabay
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We all live a very fast paced life, full of struggles and daily hustle-bustle. It can get tiring and stressful. We often get so tired that we end up forgetting about our goals and aspirations. Stress clouds our mind and makes us lethargic.

Just because there are pitfalls, doesn’t mean there are no ways of getting out of them. Life has a way of making things tough for us in order to make us stronger. Life throws lots of curve balls in our path, but to overcome them is easy, all we need is motivation. Motivation to let go of any negativity and move forward towards our goal.

Motivational quotes may seem vague or even useless to some, but they are not. We all need a little inspiration and motivation in our lives. Always remember, pen is mightier than sword. Words can have a long lasting impact on a person’s mind. Reading motivational quotes can actually motivate you to perform better in life. They may not work as efficiently on everyone, but they do leave a lasting impact on a person.

Struggles are everywhere, all we need is some motivation to deal with them. Pixabay
Struggles are everywhere, all we need is some motivation to deal with them. Pixabay

Here are some inspirational quotes about life and struggle, by some of the most successful and wise men, to give you the much needed motivation to move towards your goal :

“The Way To Get Started Is To Quit Talking And Begin Doing.” -Walt Disney

“The Pessimist Sees Difficulty In Every Opportunity. The Optimist Sees Opportunity In Every Difficulty.” -Winston Churchill

“Whatever the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve.” –Napoleon Hill

“Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value.” –Albert Einstein

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. ” –Robert Frost

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity.” –Amelia Earhart

“Every strike brings me closer to the next home run.” –Babe Ruth

“I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” –Michael Jordan

“Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.” –John Lennon

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do, so throw off the bowlines, sail away from safe harbor, catch the trade winds in your sails.  Explore, Dream, Discover.” –Mark Twain

“An unexamined life is not worth living.” –Socrates

“Eighty percent of success is showing up.” –Woody Allen

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.” –Steve Jobs

“The bird is powered by its own life and by its motivation.” –A. P. J. Abdul Kalam

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Are We Alone In The Universe? Scientists Contemplate

This is a question that impacts not only science but theology, philosophy and other areas. It’s a curiosity. It’s part of being human.

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galaxy, universe
Hubble's view of a galaxy in Ursa Major, 65 million light-years away. VOA

The Hubble Telescope has given us spectacular pictures from space, from the dramatic image of the Pillars of Creation in the Eagle Nebula, some 6,500 to 7,000 light years from Earth, to a snapshot of nearly 10,000 galaxies, including some that may be among the most distant known, existing when the universe was just 800 million years old.

Awe-inspiring though they are, they are not detailed enough to help us in our search for life in the trillions of galaxies across the universe. And physicist Justin Crepp says the prospects for finding life out there are very good.

“If tens of a percent of stars have planets that could resemble the earth and potentially have life, then the implications are that there are billions of them just within our Milky Way Galaxy.”

Crepp, an associate professor of Physics at the University of Notre Dame, has been hard at work answering the age-old question, “Are we alone in the universe?” As a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Exoplanet Science Strategy, his job is to make recommendations on how and what the U.S. will explore in space over the next decade.

In September, the committee released its initial 260-page report detailing seven recommendations. First, it encourages NASA to fly a space-based mission to directly image and characterize earth-like planets around other stars and take pictures of them. But Crepp says that’s a very challenging technical problem.

“If you try to image a planet, you run into several difficulties,” he explains. “One is that their separation is very small on the sky. So, you need to spatially resolve and isolate the signal of the planet. So, you need a certain size telescope to do that. The problem is earth’s atmosphere blurs out the images, and so it exacerbates the issue.”

Another issue is that the starlight is so bright, scientists need to find a way to block it to see the planets around it. The committee thinks the technology to do that exists, but they must be able to get above the earth’s atmosphere with the right equipment to make it happen.

 

WFIRST, universe
WFIRST, the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, shown here in an artist’s rendering, will provide astronomers with Hubble-quality images of large swaths of the sky. VOA

 

Better eyes on the skies

That leads to the committee’s second recommendation, this one, for the National Science Foundation: complete work on the Giant Magellan Telescope in Chile, and start to build the proposed Thirty Meter Telescope in Hawaii. The new technology in these super telescopes will produce images 10 times sharper than those from the Hubble, even though they are ground-based.

Their highly sophisticated equipment will also allow scientists to greatly enhance the work of the third recommendation: completing the partially funded Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope or WFIRST. When launched into space, it will search for and gather information on planets hundreds of light years away.

Crepp says that data will help scientists learn what the planets are made of.

“Is it a giant puffy atmosphere, or is it a rock or somewhere in between? Is it a water world? We don’t know the answers to these yet, but we’re just starting to get the first hints and inclinations what these worlds might be like around other stars,” Crepp said.

WFIRST, universe
Cosmic Crash with Dwarf Galaxy Reshaped Milky Way: Study. (IANS)

More importantly, scientists will try to determine if there are any signs of life.

The panel’s other recommendations include building new highly sensitive equipment, creating new ways for multidisciplinary teams all over the world to collaborate on various aspects of the project, and forming a profitable investor program to further laboratory, ground-based and theoretical telescopic research.

The big question

Crepp notes that people have wondered for millennia if our planet was unique in the universe, whether we are truly alone.

Also Read: NASA Hubble Completes First Science Operations

“This is a question that impacts not only science but theology, philosophy and other areas. It’s a curiosity. It’s part of being human. Is our world special? Is it isolated? Are there other planets out there that have life? Can we communicate with them? Are they our distant brethren? How are we related to one another? If so, what can we learn from one another? So, that’s the motivation for a lot of people on our panel to go to work on a daily basis.”

The report from the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Exoplanet Science Strategy will be reviewed by Congress. Portions of it may be included in the final 2020-2030 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, which will fund the continuing search for exoplanets and the study of extraterrestrial life. (VOA)