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Motorola Foldable Phone Concept Opens up Into a Tablet

Motorola's patent for foldable device approved

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Motorola
Motorola updates its 'One Power' smartphone with Android 9 Pie. (Wikimedia Commons)

Chinese smartphone maker Motorola’s patent for a foldable device, which includes a rectangular screen that can be folded like a phone or unfolded to work like a tablet, has been approved by the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO).

The phone patent shows a flexible display that wraps around a hinge along with a cover that can protect the display or prop the phone up like a tent.

“No surprise that Motorola apparently wants in and has actually been scheming for years. A recently awarded patent reveals its idea for a smartphone that folds out into a tablet, pretty much like other foldable phone patents out there,” SlashGear reported on Friday.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

“What makes this one a bit more interesting, however, is not the phone itself but the addition of a case cover that actually adds some value to the device,” the report added.

The patent was originally filed in September 2016 but was only granted this March and only surfaced recently.

Also Read: Motorola opens 25 ‘Moto Hubs’ in North-East

Notably, Motorola’s parent company Lenovo started working on foldable device prototypes before anyone else. (IANS)

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Now Smartphone Can Predict Health Of Mom And Newborn By Scanning Placenta

Smartphone can scan placenta to predict health of mom, newborn

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Health Diagnosis using Smartphone
Researchers have developed AI- based technology that allows smartphone to diagnose health of mother and newborn baby. Pixabay

A team of researchers has developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI)-based novel solution that could produce accurate, automated and near-immediate placental diagnostic reports via a smartphone or a tablet with the appropriate software.

Placentas can provide critical information about the health of the mother and baby but the cost, time and expertise required to analyze them are prohibitive.

The research could allow all placentas to be examined, reduce the number of normal placentas sent for full pathological examination and create a less resource-intensive path to analysis for research — all of which may positively benefit health outcomes for mothers and babies.

“The placenta drives everything to do with the pregnancy for the mom and baby, but we’re missing placental data on 95 percent of births globally,” said Alison Gernand, assistant professor of nutritional sciences in Penn State’s College of Health and Human Development.

The study was presented at the International Federation of Placenta Associations meeting held in Buenos Aires, Argentina recently.

The patent-pending technology uses AI to analyze an image of each side of the placenta after delivery and then produces a report with critical information that could impact the clinical care of the mother and child, such as whether the fetus was getting enough oxygen in the womb or if there is a risk of infection or bleeding.

Currently, there are no evidence-based standards to determine when a placenta This digital tool could offer a solution, as an individual would need only a smartphone or tablet with the appropriate software.

Smartphone scans placenta
This technology will allow the smartphone to scan placenta in order to predict the health of the mother and child. Pixabay

“Even in very low-resource areas, someone typically has a smartphone,” said Gernand. “Our goal is for a medical professional or trained birth attendant to take a photo which, after analysis through licensed software, could provide immediate information that aids in the care of the mother and baby.”

For example, an umbilical cord with an abnormal insertion point or excessive twisting can be a predictor of neonatal stroke.
Examination after a stillbirth could give a family information about whether future stillbirths may reoccur and help medical professionals advise them on possible interventions.

To create the system, the researchers analyzed 13,000 high-quality images of placentas and their corresponding pathology reports from Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

Also Read- Indian Kids on Better Global Average for Physical Activity: WHO Study

They labeled a training set of images with data points critical to understanding the placenta, such as areas of incompleteness and the umbilical cord insertion point.

Additionally, this tool could advance pregnancy research and be useful for long-term care by providing clinically meaningful information to patients and practitioners, said the researchers. (IANS)