Monday April 22, 2019

Move Closer to God For Better Sleep Quality

Religion could decrease psychological distress, substance abuse and stress exposure, which are all associated with sleep outcomes

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Move Closer to God For Better Sleep Quality
Move Closer to God For Better Sleep Quality. Pixabay

Finding it hard to get a proper night sleep? A higher religious involvement can reduce stress levels and lead to healthier sleep outcomes, say researchers.

The findings showed that persons with a greater sense of assurance of spiritual salvation tend to enjoy better sleep quality and tend to have fewer negative sleep consequences due to stressful life events and chronic conditions.

It is because higher religious involvement — religious attendance, prayer and secure attachment to God — benefits mental health by reducing stress, promoting social engagement and support from fellow members.

It also provides psychological resources — hope, optimism, sense of meaning — and promotes healthier lifestyles — lower levels of substance abuse, the researchers explained.

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Representational image. Pixabay

“This research is relatively unchartered territory that allows us to better understand the way in which religion and spirituality affect a person’s health and overall quality of life,” said Christopher Ellison in The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA).

Ellison said much of the benefit of perceived spiritual salvation among the faithful is because these persons have lower levels of psychological distress, i.e., feelings of depressed affect and anxiety.

Also Read: Can Sleeping More Affect Your Heart?

For the study, published in the journal Sleep Health, the team reviewed several large studies of religious involvement and sleep-related outcomes that included people from different age groups and religions.

Religion could decrease psychological distress, substance abuse and stress exposure, which are all associated with sleep outcomes, Ellison said. (IANS)

Next Story

Common Myths Around Sleep Decoded!

"Sleep is important to health, and there needs to be greater effort to inform the public regarding this important public health issue"

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The authors encourage patients not to dismiss loud snoring, but rather to see a doctor since this sleep behaviour may lead to heart stoppages or other illnesses. Pixabay

Common myths around sleep like snoring is harmless or having a drink helps fall asleep not only shape poor habits but may also pose a significant public health threat, say researchers.

The claim by some people that they can get by on five hours of sleep was among the top myths researchers were able to dispel based on scientific evidence.

This myth also poses the most serious risk to health from long-term sleep deficits, said the study published online in Sleep Health journal on Tuesday.

“Sleep is a vital part of life that affects our productivity, mood, and general health and well-being,” said study lead investigator Rebecca Robbins at New York University Langone Health.

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This myth also poses the most serious risk to health from long-term sleep deficits, said the study published online in Sleep Health journal on Tuesday. Pixabay

“Dispelling myths about sleep promotes healthier sleep habits which, in turn, promote overall better health,” she added.

To reach this conclusion, researchers reviewed more than 8,000 websites to identify the 20 most common assumptions about sleep.

With a team of sleep medicine experts, they ranked them based on whether each could be dispelled as a myth or supported by scientific evidence, and on the harm that the myth could cause.

Another common myth relates to snoring.

While snoring can be harmless, it can also be a sign of sleep apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder.

The authors encourage patients not to dismiss loud snoring, but rather to see a doctor since this sleep behaviour may lead to heart stoppages or other illnesses.

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The claim by some people that they can get by on five hours of sleep was among the top myths researchers were able to dispel based on scientific evidence. Pixabay

The study authors also found sufficient evidence that, despite beliefs to the contrary, drinking alcoholic beverages before bed is indeed unhealthy for sleep.

Also Read: Mexican President will Create ‘Robin Hood’ Institute to Return ‘Stolen’ Wealth to People

“Sleep is important to health, and there needs to be greater effort to inform the public regarding this important public health issue,” noted study senior investigator Girardin Jean Louis.

Robbins and her colleagues suggest creating a consistent sleep schedule and spending more time, at least seven hours, asleep. (IANS)