Wednesday October 16, 2019
Home Lead Story Now Move Musi...

Now Move Music Between Multiple Devices with Google Assistant

Voice command on Google now allows you to move Music, Videos, Podcasts and more

0
//
Google Voice Search
Google Assistant. Pixabay

Google Assistant can now move music between multiple devices in your home with just your voice command, including streaming YouTube videos between Chromecast and Google Nest smart displays.

If you start playing music on the Google Home Mini in your kitchen, just say, “Hey Google, move the music to the living room speaker.”

“Stream transfer is a new feature that lets you easily move music, videos, podcasts and more between compatible devices in your home using your voice, the Google Home app or the touchscreen on your Nest smart display,” the company said in a statement on Tuesday.

Users can now control entertainment with the Google Home app.

Google Logo
Google logo. Pixabay

Tap the cast button to see all the devices in your home, then choose which device or group you’d like to move your podcast or music to.

Google Assistant. Voice Search Feature
Voice Search Function by Google. Pixabay

“Browse for your favourite YouTube videos on Nest Hub Max, and tap the cast control on the screen to move it to your Chromecast-connected TV. Or, say “Hey Google, play it on living room TV,'” said Google.

If you have more than one Google Home and Nest smart speaker or display, you can set up a speaker group in the Home App, and transfer music from a single speaker to the speaker group to fill your whole home with music.

ALSO READ: Google puts Facial Recognition Research Before Pixel 4 Launch

According to CNET, Google is working on bringing the functionality to additional third-party devices in the future. (IANS)

Next Story

Apple Refutes Report of Sharing Safari Data with Tencent or Google

Apple CEO Tim Cook has said he believes privacy is "ingrained in the Constitution," but that he's worried about how third-party companies have worked to collect information on us

0
Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

After media reports surfaced that Apple is sending iOS users’ data via its Safari browser to Google and the Chinese tech company Tencent, the Cupertino-based iPhone maker refuted such reports, saying it safeguards people’s information in its own systems and never shares it with third-party players.

A report in reclaimthenet.org stated that “Apple, which often positions itself as a champion of privacy and human rights, may be sending some IP addresses from users of its Safari browser on iOS to Chinese conglomerate Tencent — a company with close ties to the Chinese Communist Party”.

The report focused on Apple’s “fraudulent website warning” system which is built into Apple’s Safari web browser to warn people when they visit sites that are harmful and can trick users into sharing login passwords for banks, email and social media.

“Before visiting a website, Safari may send information calculated from the website address to Google Safe Browsing and Tencent Safe Browsing to check if the website is fraudulent. These browsing providers may also log your IP address,’ read the information on Apple’s “Safari & Privacy” section.

It’s unclear when Apple started allowing Tencent and Google to log some user IP addresses, but one Twitter user reported the change in Safari happened as early as the iOS 12.2 beta in February 2019, said the report.

Google on an Android device. Pixabay

In a statement, the company said it actually doesn’t send information to Google or Tencent.

“Instead, it receives a list of bad websites from both companies and then uses it to protect people as they surf the web. Apple sometimes obscures the information about the website people visit if it requests more information to check if a questionable website is malicious,” CNET reported on Monday, citing Apple’s statement.

Also Read: Kerala Unable to get Medics from Reserved Category

For people concerned about their privacy, the service can be turned off in Safari preferences on the iPhone or Mac.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has said he believes privacy is “ingrained in the Constitution,” but that he’s worried about how third-party companies have worked to collect information on us. (IANS)