Monday August 26, 2019
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Mozilla Releasing Fix for Firefox Extensions Bug

The fix does not apply to Firefox ESR or Firefox for Android. “We’re working on releasing a fix for both, and will provide updates here and on social media,”

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Mozilla contributors started contributing more actively in the project since June, according to GitHub's version history overview.
Mozilla contributors started contributing more actively in the project since June, according to GitHub's version history overview. (IANS)

Mozilla has started releasing a fix for a bug that prevented existing and new add-ons from running or being installed on the Firefox browser late on Friday.

“The fix will be automatically applied in the background within the next few hours. No active steps need to be taken to make add-ons work again,” the company said.

Mozilla in a blog post said it had identified the issue caused by certificate expiration and had started rolling out a fix for Firefox desktop users.

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“In particular, please do not delete and/or re-install any add-ons as an attempt to fix the issue. Deleting an add-on removes any data associated with it, where disabling and re-enabling does not,” Mozilla said.

The fix does not apply to Firefox ESR or Firefox for Android. “We’re working on releasing a fix for both, and will provide updates here and on social media,” Mozilla said.

“To provide this fix on short notice, we are using the Studies system. This system is enabled by default, and no action is needed unless Studies have been disabled,” the company said in the post. (IANS)

Next Story

Researchers Find Bugs in Backend Systems of Top Free Apps

SkyWalker can examine the security of the servers supporting mobile applications, which are often operated by Cloud hosting services rather than individual app developers

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Multiple apps are displayed on an iPhone in New York. VOA

Cybersecurity researchers have identified more than 1,600 vulnerabilities in the support ecosystem behind the top 5,000 free apps available in the Google Play Store.

While the researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology and The Ohio State University studied only applications in the Google Play Store, applications designed for iOS may share the same backend systems.

The vulnerabilities were found in the backend systems that feed content and advertising to smartphone applications through a network of Cloud-based servers.

The vulnerabilities, affecting multiple app categories, could allow hackers to break into databases that include personal information – and perhaps into users’ mobile devices, said the study scheduled to be presented at the 2019 USENIX Security Symposium in the US on Thursday.

“These vulnerabilities affect the servers that are in the cloud, and once an attacker gets on the server, there are many ways they can attack,” said Brendan Saltaformaggio, Assistant Professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are displayed on an iPhone, March 13, 2019, in New York. VOA

The researchers were still investigating whether attackers could get into individual mobile devices connected to vulnerable servers.

“It’s a whole new question whether or not they can jump from the server to a user’s device, but our preliminary research on that is very concerning,” Saltaformaggio added.

In their study, the researchers discovered 983 instances of known vulnerabilities and another 655 instances of zero-day vulnerabilities spanning across the software layers – operating systems, software services, communications modules and web apps – of the Cloud-based systems supporting the apps.

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To help developers improve the security of their mobile apps, the researchers have created an automated system called SkyWalker to vet the Cloud servers and software library systems.

SkyWalker can examine the security of the servers supporting mobile applications, which are often operated by Cloud hosting services rather than individual app developers. (IANS)