Home India Mumbai School...

Mumbai School Renamed after the Missile Man of India, Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam

APJ Abdul Kalam was the Principal Patron of SIES and also recipient of SIES Lifetime Achievements Award.

0
APJ Abdul Kalam
The Missile Man of India, A. P. J. Abdul Kalam, Wikimedia

Mumbai , October 15, 2017 : Ghatkopar-based NMWS-run school was renamed as ‘SIES Dr A.P.J. Abdul Kalam Memorial High School’ on Sunday in the presence of 87 students — the number representing the “87th birthday” of the former President.

The ‘North Mumbai Welfare Society’ (NMWS), running the school with 3,250 students, had merged with the South Indian Education Society (SIES), Matunga, which runs many educational institutions in Mumbai with over 25,000 students.

The 87 students present unveiled a life-size six-feet statue of APJ Abdul Kalam at the school entrance.

Later, SIES President V. Shankar unveiled the renamed school plaque and inaugurated an exhibition “India at 70”, which comprises 70 panels dedicated to topics like “Least known facts about India”, “Things India has given to the world”, “To make a modern India” and “Great achievers of India”.

APJ Abdul Kalam was the Principal Patron of SIES and also recipient of SIES Lifetime Achievements Award.

ALSO READ Ten Inspirational Quotes by APJ Abdul Kalam on his Second Death Anniversary

“In his honour and memory and in acknowledgement of the significant contribution he made to ignite young minds, we have decided to rename the newly acquired NMWS school after him,” Shankar said.

Though satellite stations, roads, educational programmes, and a bacteria (“Solibacillus Kalami”, by NASA) have been named after India’s Missile Man, “ours is probably the only institution to name a school after Dr Kalam who was fond of children”, Shankar said.

The school will showcase books authored by the late President APJ Abdul Kalam, calling the collection ‘Kalam Ki Kalam’.

A kiosk at the school entrance will have some of Kalam’s quotes on display all day long, he added. (IANS)

 

Next Story

India: Bill Giving Reservation in Educational Institutions to People of Jammu to be Proposed in Lok Sabha

Law Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad will also introduce a bill to amend Aadhaar Act 2016

0
India, Reservation, Educational Institutions
It is the first bill to be introduced by Union Home Minister Amit Shah who will also give a statement mentioning reasons. Pixabay

A bill proposing to give reservation in educational institutions and government jobs to people living within 10 km of the International Border in Jammu is listed to be tabled in the Lok Sabha on Monday.

It is the first to be introduced by Union Home Minister Amit Shah who will also give a statement mentioning reasons for the immediate legislation by promulgation of the Jammu and Kashmir Reservation (Amendment) Ordinance, 2019.

Law Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad will also introduce a to amend Aadhaar (Targeted Delivery of Financial and Other Subsidies, Benefits and Services) Act 2016 and to further amend the Indian Telegraph Act 1885 and the Prevention of Money Laundering Act 2002.

India, Reservation, Educational Institutions
A bill proposing to give reservation in educational institutions and government jobs to people. Pixabay

It makes provision for allowing voluntary use of Aadhaar as an identity proof for opening bank accounts and getting mobile phone connection.

Also Read- Luxury Retreats for Your Puerto Vallarta Holiday Destination

Prasad will also make a statement giving reasons for promulgation of the Aadhaar and Other Laws (Amendment) Ordinance, 2019. (IANS)

Next Story

Top 10 interesting facts you need to know about BRAHMOS Missile

The deadly BrahMos is a stealth supersonic cruise missile that can be launched from submarines, ships, aircraft or land.

0
The name of the missile is taken out from the names of two rivers, the Brahmaputra of India and the Moskva of Russia. Wikimedia Commons
The name of the missile is taken out from the names of two rivers, the Brahmaputra of India and the Moskva of Russia. Wikimedia Commons

NEW DELHI: Over the years, India has emerged as a superpower to reckon with. The warfighting capabilities with cutting-edge technological advancements have manifold increased India’s potential at the global level. The man behind the success of India’s missile program is none other than the Late President APJ Abdul Kalam. The BrahMos Aerospace CEO, Sudhir Mishra has also credited the success of Indian missile program to Abdul Kalam.

The deadly BrahMos is a stealth supersonic cruise missile that can be launched from submarines, ships, aircraft or land. The strike-range of the missile is over 290 km and is ranked one of the most advanced missiles of this generation.

The missile can be launched from various platforms. Wikimedia Commons
The missile can be launched from various platforms. Wikimedia Commons

The project was a joint venture between Republic of India’s Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO) and Russian Federation’s NPO Mashinostroeyenia. The both these organization have together formed BrahMos Aerospace Private Limited. The name of the missile is taken out from the names of two rivers, the Brahmaputra of India and the Moskva of Russia.

Let’s take a look at some of the facts related to BRAHMOS Missile:

  1. BrahMos missile is the world’s fastest cruise missile in operation. The missile can travel at speeds of Mach 2.8 to 3.0.
  2.  The missile can zoom at a very low-cruising altitude of 10 meters at the terminal phase and can hit the target with pin-point accuracy.
  3.  BrahMos missile was first test-fired in 2001, at the Integrated Test Range (ITR), Chandipur and after that, the missile is tested by DRDO more than fifty times for various platforms.
  4.  The land launched and ship-launched versions are already inducted into service with air-launched and submarine-launched versions in their final phases of the trial.

    BrahMos can travel at a low altitude of 10 meters. Wikimedia Commons
    BrahMos can travel at a low altitude of 10 meters. Wikimedia Commons
  5. DRDO is also experimenting with a hypersonic version of the missile. It is expected that the new variant could attain a speed of Mach 7.
  6.  The land-attack version of BrahMos missile has been developed in many advanced forms of Block I, Block II and Block III variants.
  7.  The trajectory and speed of missile is very unique and thus makes it very hard to detect or stopped. The BrahMos can travel at a low altitude of 10 meters and is also known as terrain hugging missile.
  8.  As per to reports, it is believed that Russia and India are aiming to produce 2000 such supersonic cruise missile in the time frame of 8-1-0 years.
  9.  BrahMos missile is very much advanced in every concept as compared to much hype US’ Tomahawk missile. BrahMos is 4 times larger than Tomahawk missile and 32 times more powerful than it.

    Recently, Brahmos missile has been integrated in India's front-line aircraft, Sukhoi 30 MKI. Wikimedia Commons
    Recently, Brahmos missile has been integrated in India’s front-line aircraft, Sukhoi 30 MKI. Wikimedia Commons
  10. DRDO has already started the work to integrate the Brahmos supersonic cruise missile on 40 Sukhoi combat aircrafts. BrahMos was successfully test-fired from Sukhoi on November 22. Sukhoi’s are counted as the most potent aircrafts in the world.

Next Story

Lost in Time : The Less Explored Pamban Island and the Rameswaram Island | Travelogue

The land of temples, picturesque locales, architecture, and the home of the 'Missile Man' of India - welcome to the Rameswaram Island!

0
Rameswaram island
We take you through a town lost in time, Dhanushkodi in Rameswaram island. Wikimedia

Rameswaram, September 15, 2017 : Off the eastern coast of Tamil Nadu, some 500 km south of Chennai, lies Pamban Island. Seemingly a stone’s throw from neighboring Sri Lanka, this is an island steeped in historical significance, and with some of the most resilient people alive.

One of the longest sea bridges in the country, the iconic Pamban Bridge connects the mainland with the island, also known as Rameswaram Island. With breathtaking views of the Bay of Bengal, the journey to the island over this bridge rewinds one to colonial times, when it was built by the British to improve trade relations with Ceylon (now Sri Lanka).

Built in 1914 as India’s first-ever sea bridge, the 6,700-foot structure is in itself an engineering and historical marvel that has withstood several of nature’s furies — from storms to cyclones.

Rameswaram island
An overview of the Pamban Brindge. Wikimedia

The bridge initially ran up to the southeastern tip of the island, Dhanushkodi, now a ghost town. After a cyclone hit it in 1964, Dhanushkodi was washed away by the sea and is now a mere skeleton of the town it once was.

Remnants of its railway lines, church and the devastated dwellings of people can still be seen, though in very poor shape.

From the tip of the region, cell phone networks welcome one to Sri Lanka.

Visible from here is the Adam’s Bridge — a former land link between India and Sri Lanka, now undersea — that is also known as Rama Setu, the bridge believed to have been built by Lord Rama’s army to rescue Sita from Lanka.

Nambavel, a 50-year-old, says there can be no other home for him than Dhanushkodi, of pristine waters and picturesque views of the Bay of Bengal. Three generations of his family have lived here. Although the deadly cyclone forced many to migrate to villages around, some 50 families, including Nambavel’s, refused to leave.

“This has been our home for as long as we’ve known. We grew up playing in the sea water, then learnt to make our living through fishing or running petty shops,” Nambavel told this visiting IANS correspondent.

Rameswaram island
Residents of Dhanushkodi refuse to abandon their small town; for them the “sea is everything”. Wikimedia

“Even as many people we know migrated to nearby villages, there’s no home like Dhanushkodi for us — the sea is everything,” he said.

With sea levels rising around the world due to global warming, the region is constantly threatened by nature. But that does not deter Nambavel: “Even if another cyclone is close, most of us would like to be here, a land we’ve grown up in.”

Surrounded by sea and sand, the town cannot grow any crops and has no provision for electricity due to the wind velocity in the area. It is only the solar panels, an initiative of late President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam who hailed from Rameswaram, that light up the shacks of the few residents.

With Rameswaram considered one of the holiest places for Hindus, a majority of visitors make temples the focus of their travels.

Aiming to showcase the rich cultural and historical heritage of the island, apart from the much-visited temples, Utsa Majumder, the General Manager of the newly-launched Hyatt Place, Rameswaram, is working extensively on various itineraries that uncover the untrodden places in and around the region.

“There’s a lot more that the Rameswaram Island can offer than just the temples it is mostly known for. We want people to know that Rameswaram can be an experiential destination and not just a pilgrimage spot,” Majumder told IANS.

“From historic places that have stood the test of time to some incredible architecture and engineering like the Pamban Bridge, there’s a lot a tourist can see here,” she added.

The hotel offers these itineraries to travelers according to their interests, allowing them to explore different facets of the region, along with menus that present the cuisines of the land — from kuzhi paniyaram (rice batter dumplings) to kara kozhumbu (a spicy tamarind gravy).

Rameswaram Island
Local cuisine at Dhanushkodi. Wikimedia

The region also celebrates its much-beloved son Abdul Kalam. His two-storeyed house on Mosque Street is filled with thousands of his books and is always bustling with people.

A Rs 15-crore memorial to India’s “Missile Man”, inaugurated by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on July 27, has also grown rather quickly as a tourist attraction. The memorial houses a copy of the last speech Kalam delivered at IIM-Shillong on July 27, 2015, a number of pictures of his meetings with world leaders, and a host of other objects.

As an island that is yearning to receive a boost to its tourism, even a bottle of water bought from a shack in Dhanushkodi goes towards supporting a family.

FAQs:

Reaching there: Flights to Madurai, the nearest airport, from all major cities. From Madurai, Rameswaram can be reached in 3 hrs 30 min (160 kms) by road.

For the picturesque views from a train, pick one that is available almost every hour to Rameswaram from Madurai Railway Station.

Stay: There are four-star, three-star hotels and smaller lodges in the town.

Best time to visit: October to March as the temperatures drop and stay between 20 to 30 degrees C, making travel easier. (IANS)