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Munawwar Rana returns Sahitya Akademi Award on live TV

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Image: ABP News

New Delhi: Noted Urdu poet Munawwar Rana joined the league of writers returning their Akademi awards in protest of the ‘present situation’ in the country.

Returning the award, Munawwar Rana said that he was not happy with the current atmosphere in the country, and so, he would not accept any government recognition in future.

Although, during the show, many poets and authors suggested him not to return the award on live TV and wait but the poet refused to do so.

Rana raised the issue of authors being branded as supporters of some party or the other. “Literateurs and authors are being attached to some party or the other. Some are being called as Congress men, and some BJP supporters,” he was quoted as saying on TV.

The poet, seemingly unhappy over past references of Muslims being called Pakistani, remarked that he was a Muslim and he could be said to be Pakistani some day.

“I am a Muslim and I might be called a Pakistani.”

Talking further on the issue of Islam and terror, he took a jibe on the mindset of people, “Though, this nation is still not connected with electricity wires but Muslims are somehow connected to Dawood Ibrahim.”

The poet continued, “What are the meanings of terror in this country? This hasn’t been decided yet, however, if a Muslim fired a cracker, he is branded as a terrorist. This way justice can’t be done.”

BJP leader Sambit Patra, before and after the award was returned, noted that it was all a manufactured consent.

 

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Muslim Assassins Receive More Media Coverage in The US Than Their Non-Muslim Counterparts

Muslims carry out only 12.4 percent of the attacks in the US but comprise of 41.4 percent of media coverage

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Terror attacks receive massive media coverage
Media coverage. Pixabay.
  • Terror attacks by Muslims receive more attention by media
  • Attacks committed by white men are not given much importance
  • People are increasingly becoming fearful of Muslims

New Delhi, July 5, 2017: As per an academic study, the terror attacks committed by Muslims receive greater than approximately five times media coverage as compared to those performed by non-Muslims in America. According to the researchers from Georgia State University, there existed a 449 percent growth in media presentation when the assassin was a Muslim as per the analysis of terrorist attacks in the US between 2011 and 2015.

A survey found that even though Muslims carry out only 12.4 percent of attacks during the period of study, they get 41.4 percent of the news coverage which suggests that the media disproportionately scares people of the Muslim terrorists which builds up an avoidable hatred for Muslims. One way to overcome and prevent this is by covering news more evenly and proportionately as their fears are highly misplaced.

Scientists considered US newspaper coverage of all terrorist attacks in America and computed the articles committed to each attack. It was found that the Boston Marathon bombing which took place in 2013 committed by two Muslim attackers and killed three people, comprised of almost 20 percent of all the news coverage relating to terror attacks in the US during a period of five years. In a sharp contrast to this, a massacre at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin in 2012 that killed six people and was undertaken by a white man received only 3.8 percent of coverage.

Also read: Unless Pakistan Curbs “high-profile terrorist attack” towards India, ties will Worsen: US

A mass shooting carried out by Dylan Roof who is a white man, at an African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina, which left nine people dead got it hands on just 7.4 per cent of media coverage. Moreover, an attack by Frazier Glenn Miller in 2014 on a Kansas synagogue killed three but received a share in just 3.3 percent of reports.

The claim made by President Donald Trump in February that the attacks committed by Muslims receive less coverage is unsupported but he was right in saying that the media fails to provide enough coverage to some terrorist attacks.

Prepared by Harsimran Kaur of NewsGram. Twitter: @Hkaur1025

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Renowned Classical Singer Kishori Amonkar passes away at 84

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Classical Singer Kishori Amonkar (middle), Twitter

Mumbai, April 4, 2017: Renowned classical singer Kishori Amonkar passed away shortly before midnight, family sources said here on Tuesday.

She was 84 and breathed her last at her Dadar west home.

In her singing career spanning seven decades, she was revered as ‘Gaan-Saraswati’. Belonging to the Jaipur Gharana, she was conferred the Padma Vibhushan and Sahitya Akademi Award among many others.

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A widow, she is survived by two sons and grandchildren.

Veteran singer Lata Mangeshkar said she was depply pained to hear about Amonkar’s demise. “She was a unique and extraordinary classical singer. Her demise spells a huge loss for the world of music.”

Her funeral will be held on Tuesday evening at Shivaji Park Crematorium. (IANS)

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Hindus and Muslims at peace in Trinidad and Tobago: Strong need to convey Indian diaspora stories to the world, says Author Aliyyah Eniath

Talking about taking Indian characters abroad, Eniath said no book had earlier focused on the East Indians

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Temples in Trinidad Image Source: Wikimedia

New Delhi, September 1, 2016: Debuting with a book that gives voice to the lives of people of Indian origin in Trinidad and Tobago, author Aliyyah Eniath believes there is a strong need to convey the stories of the diaspora to the world.

People in this Caribbean nation- where nearly 40 percent of the 1.3 million population is of Indian origin- “still tightly hold on to a lot of cultural practices. Diwali is a huge festival which is a week-long celebration in Trinidad. There is no difference between Hindus and Muslims back home. Conflicts between India and Pakistan do not affect our lives”, Eniath stated.

https://twitter.com/IndianDiasporas/status/758537637028360192

“It is very important that we get our stories to the world. We have so many stories to tell. It is important that our voices are heard, that the world should know about us too because India has a huge population and is a significant part of the world population. And it is not all about American writing — it should be about Indian writing too,” Eniath, the author of “The Yard” (Speaking Tigers, Rs 350, pp 272) told IANS in an interview during a visit here.

Although Eniath was born and brought up in Trinidad and Tobago, her roots lie in Uttar Pradesh.

As an author, she believes it is “unfortunate” that publishers in Britain and the US are not too keen on stories about the Indian diaspora. But the Indian publishing industry is doing its bit to fill the gaps. “When I got the offer from the Indian publishing house, I could not refuse as I see India as a big platform for diaspora writers,” added Eniath, who is director of a lifestyle magazine.

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For her, the book and its characters are a medium for telling the world how the diaspora has been living in Trinidad and Tobago.

“My book focuses on the experience of one family living in The Yard where the characters are compelled to live together. Many Indians living in Trinidad share similar experiences as well. I think that it does convey the emotional and family bonds as well as the culture, especially the Muslims, about whom I have written and how they have different views on religion,” Eniath explained.

Talking about taking Indian characters abroad, Eniath said no book had earlier focused on the East Indians. “Authors like Jhumpa Lahiri are writing on the immigrants’ experience, but in Trinidad and Tobago, it is different as we really don’t feel like immigrants since we have been there from the start. So it has always been a British-Indian-African community.

https://twitter.com/IndianDiasporas/status/763707101168500736

“The writing is a bit different but is sort of trendsetting because I don’t think such a book has been written before with such a strong T&T and Indian connection. So I think it is a bit new as well,” said the author who wanted to become a writer ever since she read “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens.

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Choosing Indian characters was inevitable as it is “easier to relate to characters based on my experience” she said, adding: “I grew up in the close network of an Indian family in Trinidad and Tobago where everyone was involved in everyone’s life. I wanted to write about the extended Indian family.”

And given her fascination with love stories, it was also inevitable that her debut effort is also a love story.

“I am a huge fan of love stories with happy endings, but like them with some layers to it. Mine is a little different; it is mainly a love story but it is also heart-breaking. I do like very much to write about love hoping that it will connect to readers in a big way and it is also what I love to write about,” said the author. (IANS)

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