Thursday February 21, 2019

Munch Healthy Snacks That Can Make You Fit

From naturally dried fruit to crunchy seeds, here is a list of healthy snacks that can have no hard effects on body

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Munch Healthy Snacks That Can Make You Fit
Munch Healthy Snacks That Can Make You Fit. Pixabay

If you are looking for some healthy snacks to control your hunger pangs, go for raw almonds, cranberries, raw cashews and strawberries as an expert suggests that such nutritional products won’t put pressure on your waistline and satiate your tastebuds.

According to a study conducted by Carpo London, the specialist food emporium, sugar levels can be kept steady all day long by eating a few highly delicious and nutritious snacks, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

From naturally dried fruit to crunchy seeds, here is a list of healthy snacks that can have no hard effects on body.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

* Step away from your favourite caffeine fix and in its place crunch on energy mix. Combining raw almonds, cranberries, raw cashews, sunflower seeds and raw pistachios is a great way to perk up your spirits.

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* Sprinkling chia seeds over your porridge can help your body. Just a tablespoon of these seeds a day can help reduce blood pressure and suppress your appetite for longer period. Just ensure to keep drinking plenty of water as they are high in fibre.

* A handful of naturally dried strawberries, kiwis and nectarines will satisfy your sweet tooth cravings. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Mystery Solved: Why Do You Feel Sleepy When You Are Sick?

The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection.

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The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection.
The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection. Pixabay

Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found a gene that acts as a direct link between illness and the need for more sleep.

In a study of over 12,000 lines of fruit flies, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania in the US found the single gene, called nemuri, that increases the need for sleep.

The nemuri protein fights germs with its inherent antimicrobial activity and it is secreted by cells in the brain to drive prolonged, deep sleep after an infection.

“While it’s a common notion that sleep and healing are tightly related, our study directly links sleep to the immune system and provides a potential explanation for how sleep increases during sickness,” said Amita Sehgal, Professor at the varsity.

Without the nemuri gene, flies were more easily aroused during daily sleep, and their acute need for an increase in sleep — induced by sleep deprivation or infection — was reduced.

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Over expression of nemuri increased sleep in bacteria-infected flies and led to their increased survival compared to non-infected control flies. Pixabay

On the other hand, sleep deprivation, which increases the need for sleep, and to some extent infection, stimulated nemuri to be expressed in a small set of fly neurons nestled close to a known sleep-promoting structure in the brain.

Over expression of nemuri increased sleep in bacteria-infected flies and led to their increased survival compared to non-infected control flies.

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Moreover, the researchers, in the study published in the journal Science, noted that an immune cell molecule — interleukin-1 (IL-1) — is implicated in human sleep.  Pixabay

In response to infection, nemuri appears to kill microbes, most likely in the peripheral parts of the fruit fly body, and increases sleep through its action in the brain.

Also Read: Train Your Brain By Following Good Habits Constantly

Moreover, the researchers, in the study published in the journal Science, noted that an immune cell molecule — interleukin-1 (IL-1) — is implicated in human sleep.

IL-1 accumulates after prolonged wakefulness and appears to promote sleep, suggesting that nemuri is a working link between immune function and sleep. (IANS)