Tuesday March 26, 2019

Learn How Muscles Help Burn Fat During Exercise

Burning fat is likely to impact multiple aspects of metabolic health related to diabetes, heart disease and other conditions

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How exercise can help breast cancer survivors. Pixabay

Ever thought what helps burn fat across your body while exercising? According to a study, it is a molecule in our muscles that is produced during exercise and contributes to the beneficial effects of exercise on metabolism.

“Our finding bolsters the underlying notion that signals generated in exercising muscle are released into the circulation and influence other tissues such as fat cells and liver,” said senior author Robert Gerszten at Massachusetts General Hospital, the primary teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School.

The researchers knew that a protein called PGC-1? regulates metabolic genes in muscle and contributes to the response of muscle to exercise.

But how this protein conveys signals to other tissues was unclear so far.

Gerszten and his colleagues forced the expression of PGC-1? in muscle cells and then looked for metabolites that were secreted from the cells.

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BAIBA also decreased weight gain and helped balance blood sugar levels in mice, said the study published in the journal Cell Metabolism. Pixabay

They identified ?-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) as one such metabolite and found that it increased fat cells’ expression of genes that are involved with burning calories.

BAIBA also decreased weight gain and helped balance blood sugar levels in mice, said the study published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Further research revealed that BAIBA levels rise during exercise and are inversely associated with metabolic risk factors.

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“The findings suggest that BAIBA may contribute to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Manipulating BAIBA – or enzymes that generate BAIBA – may have therapeutic potential,” said Gerszten.

Burning fat is likely to impact multiple aspects of metabolic health related to diabetes, heart disease and other conditions, the study concluded.  (IANS)

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Exercise May Help You Counter Effects of Jet Lag

For the study, the team examined body clocks following exercise in 101 participants for up to five-and-a-half days

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Representational image.
representational image. Pixabay

Finding it hard to cope with jet lag, shift-based work? Doing some excercise can shift the human body clock and help you adjust to the shifted schedules, suggests new research.

The study, from the Arizona State University, showed that exercise can shift the human body clock with the direction and amount of this effect depending on the time of day or night in which people exercise.

Exercising at 7 a.m. or between 1 and 4 p.m. advanced the body clock to an earlier time, and exercising between 7 and 10 p.m. delayed the body clock to a later time.

Exercising between 1 and 4 a.m. and at 10 a.m., however, had little effect on the body clock, and the phase-shifting effects of exercise did not differ based on age or gender, the researchers explained.

“Exercise has been known to cause changes to our body clock. We were able to clearly show in this study when exercise delays the body clock and when it advances it,” said lead author Shawn Youngstedt, from the varsity.

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Exercise can help you counter effects of jet lag, shift-based work. Pixabay.

“This is the first study to compare exercise’s effects on the body clock, and could open up the possibility of using exercise to help counter the negative effects of jet lag and shift work.”

The findings, published in The Journal of Physiology, suggest exercise could counter the effects of jet lag, shift work, and other disruptions to the body’s internal clock (e.g., military deployments) helping individuals adjust to shifted schedules.

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For the study, the team examined body clocks following exercise in 101 participants for up to five-and-a-half days.

The baseline timing of each participant’s body clock was determined from urine samples collected every 90 minutes to measure the time of the evening rise in melatonin and the peak of melatonin several hours later. (IANS)