Tuesday January 21, 2020

Eating Mushrooms May Prevent Cognitive Decline in Older Adults

Other compounds contained within mushrooms may also be advantageous for decreasing the risk of cognitive decline

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Mushrooms. Pixabay

Older adults who eat mushrooms more than twice a week can halve their risk of losing memory as well as language and attention skills, a key factor for the development of Alzheimer’s disease, finds a new study.

The study, led by a team from the National University of Singapore, found that even one small portion — three quarters of a cup — of mushrooms a week may still be beneficial to reduce the chances of mild cognitive impairment.

It also improved their cognitive tests and led to faster processing speed.

“This association is surprising and encouraging. It seems that a commonly available single ingredient could have a dramatic effect on cognitive decline,” said lead author Lei Feng, Assistant Professor at the varsity.

Chef Eduardo Garcia, founder of Maximo Bistrot and former migrant worker in the US, cuts mushrooms at his restaurant in Mexico City, July 13, 2017.

The reason could be a specific compound found in almost all varieties of mushrooms called ergothioneine (ET).

“ET is a unique antioxidant and anti-inflammatory which humans are unable to synthesise on their own. But it can be obtained from dietary sources, one of the main ones being mushrooms,” added Irwin Cheah, researcher from the varsity.

Also Read- New Robotic Tool to Detect, Kill Cancer Cells

For the study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the team collected data from more than 600 men and women aged above 60.

Other compounds contained within mushrooms may also be advantageous for decreasing the risk of cognitive decline. (IANS)

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Successful Bariatric Surgery Among Older Adults: Study

Weight loss surgeries are proven to be successful for older adults

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Study indicates that older adults treated with bariatric surgery can recover well and have a reduced risk of obesity-related complications. Pixabay

Weight-loss or bariatric surgeries are not usually performed in people above the age of 65. But researchers, including Indian-origin, have now found that these procedures could lead to successful weight loss and better diabetes control in older adults.

The study, presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Brighton, UK, indicates that elderly patients treated with bariatric surgery (gastric bypass or gastric sleeve) can recover well and have a reduced risk of obesity-related complications, including heart disease and diabetes.

“Although based on a small number of patients, our data suggest that successful weight loss and improved diabetes control can be safely achieved with surgery in older patients, which could have real benefits for their longevity and quality of life,” said study researcher Nader Lessan from the Abu Dhabi-based Imperial College London Diabetes Centre.

Lessan and the study’s co-author Saradalekshmi Radha assessed the results of 22 patients who had attended their medical centre and who had undergone weight loss surgery after the age of 65.

Two years after weight-loss surgery, the patients had, on an average, lost 24 per cent of their original body weight.

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Data suggests that successful weight loss and improved diabetes control can be safely achieved with surgery in older adults. Pixabay

In addition, of the 11 patients who had been on insulin to control their type 2 diabetes, four no longer needed it, while for others, the total insulin dose required had significantly decreased.

The only adverse effects reported during the two year period were iron and vitamin D deficiencies, which happen in younger patients too.

Also read- Bariatric Surgery Leads To Nutritional Deficiency

“Management of obesity and diabetes in old age is challenging. There is a lot of scepticism around conducting weight-loss surgery in patients over 65,” Lessan said.

“Our study suggests these procedures could be considered in older adults as an effective intervention to aid weight loss and associated complications.” (IANS)