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Music lovers India embracing high-resolution audio (HRA): JBL by Harman

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Music, Pixabay

New Delhi, April 24, 2017: Over the last decade, India has witnessed a revolution in the way music is heard. With a growing tribe of audiophiles who won’t settle for anything less when it comes to experiencing music, high-resolution audio (HRA) is emerging as the first choice for them, a top executive from US-based audio electronics company JBL by Harman has said.

As we shift from records, cassettes, CDs/DVDs and MP3 to live streaming where convenience takes precedence over fidelity, the content as envisaged by the artiste is diluted, nuances are lost and the overall experience is mediocre.

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Here is where HRA comes as a saviour. It is an audio format that has a sampling rate of 96 KHz/24 bit and can reproduce very close to original sound as recorded in a studio or a concert hall.

“Quality and durability drives the Indian audio market. Audiophiles who are passionate about the quality of sound will go an extra mile and spend an extra penny on a good quality audio product. This audience understands the technology behind audio products and equipments,” Prashant Govindan, Senior Director, Harman Professional, India Operations, Engineering/R&D, told IANS in an email interview.

As a key player in Harman’s extensive portfolio of legendary brands, JBL contributed to an overall sales increase of 18 per cent in India for the entire lifestyle audio division in the 2016 fiscal year.

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For Harman’s lifestyle audio division, the fiscal 2016 operating income increased 36 per cent to $267 million from $196 million (On a GAAP basis) in the country as compared to 2015.

According to Govindan, it is essential for consumers to understand how the difference in fidelity and overall quality is immediately discernable when the same content is played back in high-resolution audio equipment.

“The consumers who have been exposed to the difference in quality immediately appreciate the better quality,” Govindan told IANS.

With high-resolution audio, listeners can experience fine details of audio like subtlety and depth.

Better frequency sampling rate and high bit rate makes the playback audio very close to the original audio track — which a CD recording cannot capture. Popular formats for storing high-resolution audio are FLAC, ALAC, WAV, AIFF and DSD.

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Sampling rate means the number of times samples are taken per second during the conversion of analog sound waves to digital. Thus, a precise audio signal can be produced with more bits like 24-bit in high-resolution audio.

“We have observed mass-market heavyweights bring HRA to a larger audience so that people are able to understand what high-resolution audio is and the benefits it can bring to music. The future of HRA certainly looks bright and promising and is fast becoming a hot and trending topic in India as well,” Govindan stressed.

While most streaming providers have a paid premium ‘high-resolution’ option, the content is still lacking in terms of overall fidelity and tonal quality.

For a more accurate and fulfilling experience, music needs to be recorded at the highest sampling rate possible (preferably 96KHz and above) and stored in a lossless format that does not compress and take away the fidelity (WAV, ALAC or FLAC).

High-resolution audio tends to reveal every music nuance with fine integrity — from deep sub-bass lows to crystalline highs — bringing listeners closer to the original performance.

“We will continue to push audio boundaries through innovative, connected and personalised sound technology to the benefit of consumers worldwide,” Govindan added. (IANS)

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Actress Sonakshi Sinha Claims, Makers Repackage Iconic Songs For Current Generation

Reacting to the criticism, Sonakshi said: "Even I like the original better and there is no comparison with that."

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Reacting to the criticism, Sonakshi said: "Even I like the original better and there is no comparison with that." Pixabay

Actress Sonakshi Sinha, who has featured in the video of the recreated version of “Mungda” song, says that makers repackage iconic songs for the current generation.

Her latest dance number “Mungda” for the film “Total Dhamaal” has earned the wrath of the fans of the original number featuring Helen.

“Mungda” was originally sung by Usha Mangeshkar with music by Rajesh Roshan and lyrics by Majrooh Sultanpuri.

The song has been recreated by singers Jyotica Tangri, Shaan and Subhro Ganguly and music director duo Gourov-Roshin.

Reacting to the criticism, Sonakshi said: “Even I like the original better and there is no comparison with that. When we recreate a song, that time we don’t think that we will make a particular song better than the original one because when you are recreating an iconic song then there is no point making comparison with the recreated song.”

Sonakshi Sinha
Actress Sonakshi Sinha. Wikimedia Commons

“We are only trying to repackage that and give it to the today’s generation who might not listen to old songs. For me as an artiste, I have been told by makers of the film that they wanted me to be a part of the song as they don’t see anybody performing it so, that was a big deal for me that makers felt that I would do justice to the song and I am very happy.”

Sonakshi was interacting with the media at the fourth edition of Next Brand Vision Awards 2019 here on Tuesday.

Talking about her upcoming releases, she said: “I am looking forward to every film of mine which is coming out this year. ‘Kalank’ is my next release. It is releasing in April.

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“I am shooting for ‘Mission Mangal’, which will release in August. We are almost done with that. I am starting ‘Dabangg 3’ around the end of April.”

Asked about the amount of fun audiences should expect from “Dabangg 3”, Sonakshi said: “Double and triple of what you saw in first two parts.” (IANS)