Monday May 28, 2018
Home Religion UK Employers ...

UK Employers Tell Muslim Woman to Remove ‘Terrorist Looking’ Black Hijab

Allegedly it was claimed by a colleague that the predominantly non-Muslim and white community around the company's office would "feel intimidated and scared if they saw the claimant"

0
//
156
MUSLIM MAN
How safe are Muslim women? Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint
  • The woman was told that “it would be in the best interest of the business for her to change the colour of her hijab, due to the supposed terrorist affiliation with the colour black”
  • Allegedly a colleague claimed that the predominantly non-Muslim and white community around the company’s office would “feel intimidated and scared if they saw the claimant”
  • This case marks the first of its kind in the UK following a landmark ruling at the European Court of Justice in March

UK, June 27, 2017: A Muslim lady has lodged a religious discrimination complaint against her employers at a UK tribunal. Allegedly her employers had ordered her to remove her black hijab because it symbolised “terrorist affiliation”. The estate agent who intends to remain anonymous had been working for Harvey Dean in Bury, Greater Manchester, for about a year when she filed the allegation about her managers.

The Independent quoted a complaint filed at the Manchester Employment Tribunal as saying that the woman was told that It is meant by moving from a back office into public view “that it would be in the best interest of the business for her to change the colour of her hijab, due to the supposed terrorist affiliation with the colour black”.

Allegedly it was claimed by a colleague that the predominantly non-Muslim and white community around the company’s office would “feel intimidated and scared if they saw the claimant”.

The woman had been wearing a black hijab or headscarf that left her face uncovered since starting at Harvey Dean. She stated that she was not prepared to change her attire for the reasons that were pointed out to her. She added that she refused her employers’ orders again in a phone call and a meeting held the following day with the male manager. Allegedly, the manager had brought coloured hijabs into the office for her to change into as well.

The woman said that she was reprimanded hours later for sending a text message to her father. According to the comment filed with tribunal, “He then went on a tirade accusing the claimant of not working.” Also, the claimant informed him that she was on her lunch break but he told her that he did not care. Then he proceeded to tell her to: ‘Get the (expletive) out of here.’

After the incident, the woman left the office. Hearing nothing further from the company, she decided to submit a letter of resignation the following week.

She claimed that her objections to the order “fell on deaf ears” and she was left feeling unable to continue with the company. The former housing sales negotiator felt “singled out” as the only Muslim woman in the office. She feels that the discrimination she faced was a result of both her religion and gender.

Also readMuslim Women in India Can Become Change Agents With Education

The tribunal complaint highlights the fact that her treatment created an “intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating and offensive environment” at the work-space for the complainant, and intends to receive a written admission that she was subjected to unlawful discrimination.

According to IANS reports, the case will be considered at a preliminary hearing at the Manchester Employment Tribunal on July 20 and it could result in Harvey Dean paying “aggravated damages” and additional compensation covering loss of earnings, holiday pay and legal fees.

According to Zillur Rahman, an employment lawyer representing the claimant for Rahman Lowe Solicitors, this case marks the first of its kind in the UK following a landmark ruling at the European Court of Justice in March.

Judges found that companies could legally prohibit employees from wearing the Islamic headscarf, but only as part of prohibitions that encompass all religious and political symbols equally.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter: @dubumerang

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Women’s sports coverage encounters subtle sexism: Study

It has been found that 95 percent of anchors, co-anchors and analysts, analysing the sports coverage were male

0
//
44
Women's sports and the surrounding sexism
Women's sports. Pixabay
  • A subtler sexism frames the TV broadcasts of women in sports, according to a recent study
  • L.A.-based network affiliates devote only 3.2 percent of airtime to women’s sports on news broadcasts
  • The researchers have been constant in updating their findings roughly every five years

Washington D.C. [USA], Sep 19, 2017: A recent study stated that a subtler sexism has now made it to the Newsrooms framing the TV broadcast of women in sports.

The ongoing, decades-long study by the University of Southern California researchers suggests, that even if the mainstream broadcast coverage now treats the sports played by women a little more seriously, a major part of it, mostly respectful coverage still has to face the relegation to the sideline.

Only 3.2 percent of airtime, according to the research team, was devoted to women’s sports on news broadcasts, by the L.A.-based network affiliates, witnessing a degradation of 5 percent from 1989, which was the first year of the study. ESPN’s SportsCenter, on the other hand, only stands worse, devoting 2 percent of the airtime to women’s sports, same as it was in 1999 when the study began tracking the show.

“When compared to the start of the study, women used to be framed in ways that were overtly sexist. Now the sexism is subtler,” said lead author Michela Musto. “It seems at first that it’s respectful, but if you compare the framing with men’s sports, women are talked about in a much more boring way. There is no joking or complimenting. Those kinds of descriptors are missing from women’s sports.”

The researchers have been constant in updating their findings roughly every five years, in 1993, 1999, 2004, 2009 and 2014, to be exact. It has been planned to start the research later this year, for it to be updated in 2018.

The researchers, in a manner similar to the previous cycles of the study, analyzed three two-week segments of TV sports news coverage on three Los Angeles network affiliates, and on ESPN’s SportsCenter. The coverage was then coded across 20 distinct categories, which included gender, segment length, type of sport, competitive level of sport, and production value.

Much of the disparity may owe to the little airtime devoted to each individual woman’s story on SportsCenter. Sports stories revolving around women averaged 77 seconds, approximately 50 percent shorter than men’s stories, however, better than the 44 seconds allotted to them on local affiliates.

The overall respectful coverage may be the advancement from the time when Morganna the Kissing Bandit was one of the few women featured on the local sports report. But the refined tone of this coverage carried a brand of chauvinism, of it own. The researchers gave it the name “gender bland”, a programming that confronts the treatment of a mandatory “set aside.”

In “gender-bland” programming, the athletic achievements of women are depicted as “lackluster” and “uninspired.” That is, unless they approve to the image of caring teammates or partners and spouses, for instance, the 2016 Olympic trap-shooter medalist Corey Cogdell-Unrein’s portrayal in mainstream media as “the wife of a Chicago Bears linebacker.”

Also readWhere Girls and Women are missing out in Sports? Or is it simple Gender Discrimination

A surge of female athletes since the 1970s, when Title IX, which prohibited discrimination based on gender in education for athletics became a law, makes the sparse coverage of women’s sports out of step, the researchers noted.

Around 3.1 million girls participate in high school sports today, compared to 4.4 million boys; in a stark contrast to the situation 45 years ago, when only 294,000 girls played sports in high school, and less than 39,000 played in college.

There are but few women in sports media industry that may play a role in influencing the coverage decisions, noted the researchers. It has been found that 95 percent of anchors, co-anchors and analysts analysing the sports coverage were male. The data shows resemblance to the other findings stating that 90.1 percent of sports print editors happen to be male.

If a woman in the sports broadcast industry happens to scale heights, as the case of Samantha Ponder, a sideline reporter who replaced Chris Berman as host of ESPN’s featured NFL program, Sunday NFL Countdown, this August, it still makes big news.

“I do believe that part of the move toward greater respect and equity for women’s sports in the media will involve getting more women into newspaper sports desks, radio and TV commentary,” said senior author Michael Messner.

“However, I also think that employers, when they hire new people, should seek to hire reporters and commentators — women or men — who really care about women’s sports, who can and will express genuine enthusiasm, rather than gender-bland sexism, when they report on women’s sports,” he added.

The study has been published in the journal Gender & Society.

prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. Twitter @goel_samiksha