Tuesday October 15, 2019
Home India Muslim Women ...

Muslim Women in India Can Become Change Agents With Education

Muslim women would have realised their full potential and they will ensure that India and the world do as well

0
//
Muslim Women
Muslim mother and daughter. Pixabay
  • Narendra Modi called for empowerment and education of Muslim women
  • The literacy rate and the higher education statistics represent a double whammy for Muslim women as it relates to empowerment

June 25, 2017: Prime Minister Narendra Modi recently called for empowerment and education of Muslim women. One would have expected this message to receive widespread acceptance and support. It did not.

There was resistance on several fronts for a variety of reasons. Some saw Modi’s move as a political stunt. Some questioned whether Modi was doing anything meaningful in the education and empowerment area. Others came out against it because of a connection to the triple-talaq controversy.

There is no gainsaying that there is an unequivocal and critical need to empower Muslim women through education in order for India to achieve its full potential. The status of education in general was captured by the 2001 census which revealed that the Muslim literacy rate was only 59 per cent.

ALSO READ: Goddess Bonbibi: Here is Why this Goddess in Sunderban unites both Hindus and Muslims!

In response to these and additional findings regarding Muslims and others in the weaker sections, the Sachar Committee Report of 2006 disclosed a development deficit in a number of areas. The report resulted in the creation of an across-the-board programme for the development of minorities.

This programme and other initiatives have had a beneficial effect. In the 2011 census, the overall literacy rate for Muslims went up substantially to 68.5 per cent against the national literacy rate of 74 percent.

That was good news. But the numbers within the numbers tell a different story. The worst literacy rate for women in India is among those in the Muslim community at less than 52 percent. That is cause for concern.

Even more worrying is the performance of Muslims in terms of higher education. A US India Policy Institute released in 2013, six years after the Sachar Report, showed that only 11 per cent of Muslims in India pursue higher education compared to a national average of approximately 19 per cent. Most significantly, that study revealed that there has been a decline in the general category of Muslims participating in higher education.

The literacy rate and the higher education statistics represent a double whammy for Muslim women as it relates to empowerment. In education, literacy is the starting line and higher education is the finishing line for becoming fully empowered. These statistics indicate that not enough Muslim women even get to the starting line and very few get to the finishing line.

This must change. Muslim women must be able to participate fully along the entire educational continuum. This participation is pivotal for the future of the individual Muslim woman, the Muslim family and India.

For the individual Muslim woman, education itself is empowering. It removes the shackles of ignorance. It develops the knowledge, skills and attitudes to pursue and create one’s own destiny. It builds self-esteem and confidence. Education is the gift that keeps on giving. It is an opportunity creator and bridge to the future.

For the Muslim family, education prepares the Muslim woman to be a change agent. Too many Muslim families are trapped in poverty because of a lack of education. With her own education, the woman can educate and equip her children to escape that trap. I firmly believe education is a powerful equaliser, opening doors to Muslim women to lift themselves out of poverty.

For India, education delivers on the promise of the largest representative democracy in the world. Central to that promise are equality, opportunity and inclusive economic mobility. Education levels the playing field and makes that promise a reality. Once that reality exists for Muslim women they will be able to deliver on that promise for India by helping others up the ladder of success. They will have the capacity to change the face of India and the landscape of the world.

In the 21st century, higher education is becoming more important for climbing that ladder. By higher education, I don’t just mean four-year colleges or universities. I include technical, vocational and professional education at the secondary levels.

It might seem that I am a little delusional given the current circumstances in talking about Muslim women and higher education. But that is not the case.

On my last visit to India in February this year, I had the good fortune to give addresses and speak with young Muslim women students at Fatima Girls Inter College in Azamgarh and Abdullah Women’s College at Aligarh Muslim University (AMU). I was inspired by them and their commitment to making a positive difference in India.

During that visit, my wife Debbie and I also dedicated the new Management Complex that we had financed at AMU. In my comments at the dedication ceremonies, I predicted that from this Complex “will come the future leaders who will make India and the world a better place.”

Many of those leaders will be educated and empowered Muslim women who will be in the forefront of empowering other Muslim women who will then educate and empower other Muslim women — and the cycle will continue.

When that occurs, those Muslim women would have realised their full potential and they will ensure that India and the world do as well. When they succeed, all of us succeed. India succeeds. The world succeeds. (IANS)

 

Next Story

An Open Letter to Prime Minister Narendra Modi

While taking note of your policies, pet projects like ‘Swatchh Abhiyaan’ (Cleanliness Drive) and future plans

0
Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
PM Narendra Modi being sworn in for a new term.
Tania Bhattacharya
Tania Bhattacharya.

By Tania Bhattacharya

Dear Prime Minister Modi,

Congratulations on winning the Indian general elections of 2019, and being sworn-in as Prime Minister. While taking note of your policies, pet projects like ‘Swatchh Abhiyaan’ (Cleanliness Drive) and future plans for the nation’s development and progress, I take this opportunity to contribute my two cents as a thinking Indian citizen, as to what you could do more. So, allow me, to bring your attention to some unresolved matters in the interest of human civility, that the Indian state should feel obliged to tend to. 

CHINESE-INDIANS

Chinese Indians are those, that are descended from Chinese immigrants to India. Emigrating Chinese people to India have traditionally belonged to the Hakka region. Historically originating from the northern parts of their homeland, they had settled in the southern areas of China around the thirteenth century. Guangxi and Guangdong are some of the places that they were living in, before they decided to migrate to India. Cities and provinces in China’s south, which are in close proximity to India, tend to have a multicultural outlook, with cuisines that have been heavily influenced by India’s spice trade. Guangdong and Guangxi are no different. Hakka Chinese were here with the intention of advancing their trade and making themselves prosperous, but a large number took to us, and made the decision of adopting India as their new homeland. I do not find this out of the ordinary.

Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
Chinese children in China Town, Tangra, Kolkata.

For over two thousand years, India has witnessed the arrival of asylum seeking foreigners who have ultimately enriched our history with their presence. There have been the Hellenic Greeks, the Huns of German descent who converted to Hinduism or Buddhism and settled down with Indian spouses, the Indo-Greek rulers like the Bactrians who were no different in their attitude toward us, the Chinese students and travellers who entered India during the first millennium for the study of Buddhism, the Siddhi black Africans who have retained intact their Islamic faith, the Zoroastrians who have likewise had never had their religion interfered with, the Greeks who were fleeing Ottoman persecution, the Armenians, the Jews, the Tibetans who escaped their occupied territories in order to lead respectable lives, and the Afghan merchants and the Bhutias from Bhutan, both of whom have always arrived here from time to time, for a quick buck. None of them have complained of systematic, state-sponsored discrimination against them. 

Due to the unfortunate events of 1962 between our northern neighbour and ourselves, Chinese Indians were unlawfully interned in concentration camps at Rajasthan. During the time of their internment, their homes and properties were seized and taken over, leaving them with nothing after they were freed. This reminds one of the similar fate that had befallen Japanese-Americans during the Second World War. It seems, the Indian government never found the time or the inclination to render a genuine, and heartfelt apology to the people who have suffered unnecessarily simply as a result of their Chinese heritage. It is appalling, that even during present times, and despite your party’s five year rule in India with the sixth one running, Chinese Indians are not allowed citizenship rights in this country. It would be a wonderful gesture, if you found it in you to not only apologize to them on the behalf of all Indians, but also removed the clause that prevents them from acquiring citizenship in India. It would go a long way in healing the wounds.

SIDDHI RAPPROACHMENT

Also Read- Men in India Prone to Develop Lifestyle Diseases in Their 30s

As mentioned under the previous header, Siddhis have been here as first, our esteemed guests and then as our lawful fellow citizens, beginning with the eighth century. For decades, India, her people, and her politicians, have openly favoured spectator-sports like Cricket, Lawn Tennis, Football, and even Hockey, over athletic categories which feature at the Olympic events. We have gone so far as to turn our backs against South Asia’s indigenous games like Kabaddi, and Kho Kho. Isn’t this ironic, given that South Asia had presented the world with homegrown games such as Ludo, Snakes and Ladders, and Chess? Over the last decade, some improvement seems to have been made as regards our demeanour towards Kabaddi, with India now flaunting this ancient, homegrown product for the world to witness. Many teams from foreign nations participate in the annual Kabaddi contests that are being organized.

Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
Kamala Babu Siddi in the centre, with her daughters.
Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
17-year-old sprinting champion Ravikiran Siddi, holding his medal.

Siddhis are of Bantu African origin whose talents had once been harvested by the SAI (Sports Authority of India). Assuming that their Black African genetics had enabled them to excel at sports. SAI established SAG (Special Area Games) in the latter half of the 1980s, with an eye to train the potential Siddhi medal winners for India. From an existence in ignominy, the Sidhhis were elevated to a level of importance that they had revelled in. The efforts had reaped recognizable dividends. Kamala Babu Siddhi emerged as one of India’s top medal winners. At the young age of 15, she partook in the Women’s Pentathlon event, and broke the record. But the euphoria was short lived. Due to a lack of infrastructure and planning, the SAG was put to sleep by our SAI. Even though in recent times, with the help of Siddhi Indian athlete and trainer Judge Jackie Harnodkar, training seems to have been revived, it is doubtful, that the zeal and fervour of the previous phase will reveal itself.

Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
Judge Jackie Harnodkar.

I would urge you Prime Minister Modi, to set up special training camps for posterity, to mine the latent sporting talents of our Siddhi sisters and brothers. 

Also Read- South Korean Tech Giant Samsung Launches Solutions for Deaf-blind, Visually Impaired

NETAJI FILES

Unlike Rahul Gandhi and the Congress, who expectedly, did not commit to any further progress over the whereabouts of Indian anti-colonial freedom revolutionary Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, you and your party have maintained, that revelations to finally bring closure for millions of Netaji’s fans and supporters, is a priority of yours. 

In the first phase of your administration that lasted from twenty fourteen to twenty nineteen, you did make good on your promise. A number of hitherto classified files on the fate of India’s most famed armed revolutionary (along with Hutaatma Bhagat Singh), were declassified and placed in the public domain with the aim of making them accessible to researchers who are keen to determine Netaji’s whereabouts, post the August of nineteen forty five.

Very quickly, those interested in the case of Netaji learned however, that the revealed files were the convenient ones, parroting the same worldview that has remained the standard lie of previous central governments. Your office went to the extent of declaring, that the crucial material pertaining to the case would be withheld at all cost, since it would negatively affect India’s relations with a number of foreign countries. What a feeling of déjà vu, Sir! This is what we, the admirers of one of India’s great children had felt, when Congress ruled India had been recalcitrant over the declassification issue. Why the kick to our bellies, Mr. Prime Minister? Why are you aping the people you politically despise, when it comes to the crucial problem of Right to Information? A significant number of Netaji’s supporters were responsible in voting you to power. Have you no responsibility toward this section?

Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
Of the sixty four Netaji files that were declassified, none stood out, much to the chagrin of investigators.

Another nagging question remains. How can India’s foreign relations with the world be abruptly hampered, when the events under purview, took place a number of generations previously, when South Asia was under colonial domination? Something is certainly amiss, here! What is it that you do not want the Indian populace to fathom? Presumably, you have had a look at the aforementioned files, and have seen something in them, that terrified you, and determined your current course of action. What was it that fazed you this much? Or did you discover that the trope of India’s foreign relations being affected, was superseded by the fact, that Netaji was harmed by political forces within South Asia? What is the truth, and how long do we have to wait, for a genuine closure, Sir? There are people, and perfectly sane, respectable ones at that, who have gingerly linked the questionable ‘natural’ death of former Indian Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri, to Netaji’s fate. I am sure you are in knowledge of this. Many of the theorists, belong to your party. They are not kidding, when they claim what they do. 

I hope, you will find it in yourself, to come clean on incidents that happened during the Second World War, and can no longer affect post-independence India’s proximity to her friends. Researchers on Netaji, shall not rest, until the truth is known. Don’t leave us, in the lurch.

JAMSHEDPUR AIRPORT

Jamshedpur is one of India’s planned cities, and ranks at number one, on the scale of cleanliness, where eastern India is concerned. Owned by the Tata group of companies, it is the location of one of the world’s largest steel production units, as you may be aware. In 2018, Tata Steel Limited, was ranked eleventh, globally, by the World Steel Association, in terms of tonnage of production. 

Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
Jamshedpur, also known as Tatanagar after its Zoroastrian founder, Jamsetji Tata, has no airport dedicated to domestic or international travel. This one is exclusively for dignitaries who visit the city.

A progressive and developed urban town, Jamshedpur has all that an infrastructure specialist would desire; malls, parks, zoos, gardens, shopping centres, lakes, hills, real estate, thriving public and private sectors, educational institutions, and dependable law enforcement. This bustling metropolis, which contributes substantially to India’s growth and per capita income, lacks an airport, Mr. Prime Minister. Isn’t this paradoxical? A city teeming with people who frequently travel outside for work, education, business, and research, is yet to have their own airport! At present, natives of Jamshedpur can only access flights by first travelling to the nearby city of Ranchi. It is a kind of travesty, if you ask me.

Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
XLRI, Xavier’s Labour Research Institute located at Jamshedpur, is one of India’s best.
Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
Graduates from the iconic XLRI Management School, Jamshedpur.

An airport has been in the pipeline for as long as the residents can remember. It was proposed to be built at the location of Sonari, but any chance for domestic and/or international flights from the area, have come to naught. It is vital Sir, that Jamshedpur be duly presented with its very own air terminal, in as shortest a time as possible. Negotiations with the Tatas and the local aboriginal population must be achieved right away.

Letter, Prime Minister, Narendra Modi
The pristine Jubilee Lake, with its fountains, located in Jamshedpur, is a prime tourist attraction of the city.

It is commendable, that your government has decriminalised suicide. Those who attempt suicide do not deserve a jail term, but sessions with a psychiatrist. That the government wishes to provide mental health consultations to such bereaved and anxious individuals, is to be celebrated. Last year, the Supreme Court of India lifted the ban on LGBT marriages. This has been another feather in the cap of universal humanism. Ancient India held no grudge against those who had practised a sexuality that was different from the accepted one.