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Winters open up a lot more options for us to explore and experiment with

With the change of season, it’s time to dig into items that are not served throughout the year. Try gajar pak, bathua ka or gucchi ki galawat that are mostly prepared with ingredients only available during winter, say experts:

Chef Saransh Goila has a few suggestions:


* Bathua ka saag: Bathua (Chenopodium album) is rich in iron and calcium, low on fat and tasty too. This season is all about sweets and fattening food, hence bathua is a good way to add the right balance. Also, this is the best season to consume as Bathua is abundantly found during winter.

* Green garlic sabzi: Another ingredient that is available in winter is the green garlic. Whilst the most common thing one can do is make chutney but you can also prepare green garlic sabzi. It has a lovely and balanced flavour which is noticeable but not overpowering.

* Undhiyu: For most Gujaratis, winter isn’t wintering without the steaming bowls of undhiyu on their dining table. ‘Undhu’ which means upside down in Gujarati is a mixed vegetable dish that is a regional specialty of Definitely, a must try in this season.

* Gajar pak: Winter is here, and it’s the season for vibrant red carrots. There’s nothing better than making some gajar halwa. Apart from that, you can even try gajar pak. It is same as halwa but presented in the form of a barfi.

* Daulat ki chaat: Daulat ki chaat is a frothy and foamy treat which is a part of every feast and celebration. This cottony pile of foam is made out of thick creamy milk and is topped off with sugar, cardamom, almond flakes, and pistachios. It is only available in winter as it loses its texture in hot weather.

Chef Vishal Chandnani, Corporate Chef, The Frontier Post, Lower Parel, Mumbai, also has a list of dishes you can try:

* Shorba-e-Gulzar soup: It is a tomato shorba prepared with fresh tomatoes and roasted cumin seeds. Murgh badami shorba is an extract of chicken with garlic and Indian spices with almonds. Shorba is traditionally prepared by simmering of meat or vegetables and flavoured with aromatic traditional Indian spices and herbs.

* Gucchi ki galawat: It is a mouth-melting patty of wild mushrooms infused with smoked spices — perfect for vegetarians. Galauti kebab, which is a soft succulent patty of lamb blended with exotic spices, is a trademark of Lucknow and best to enjoy during winter.

* Nalli nihari: Lamb shanks simmered overnight in a silken golden gravy with special Indian spices is again a Lucknowi special and relished during winter.

* Dal frontier: It is a dish that involves black lentils which are slow cooked for hours. It is an extremely popular preparation from the Punjab region. IANS


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