Tuesday June 18, 2019
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Mysterious tales of men, a dose of motivation ( Book Reviews)

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image source: www.texasmonthly.com

This time, it’s fiction ruled by male protagonists. There’s a gripping story of two men whose lives are interlinked and who are willing to break every rule to win, a man whose life changes after he finds himself dangerously trapped in a suicide case, a boy who is made to live separately in a house where the residents die mysteriously.

Finally, an inspirational book that motivates one to take risks and overcome the fear of uncertainty. Here’s this weekend’s dose of the bookshelf. Read on!

1. Book: The Sialkot Saga; Author: Ashwin Sanghi; Publisher: Westland Ltd; Pages: 584; Price: Rs. 350

Arvind and Arbaaz, the leading protagonists of the book, are businessmen of a kind. Both are unaware that what they seek and fight over is the very obstacle in realising an ancient secret that dates to a time long forgotten.

The story weaves together the past and the present, where the lives of these characters are unwillingly intertwined and ricochet off one another while they play out their sinister and murderous plots of personal and professional one-upmanship.

2. Book: Nothing Can Be as Crazy; Author: Ajay Mohan Jain; Publisher: Rupa; Pages: 206; Price: Rs. 250

A girl, after sneaking into the highly-restricted area of a bank, jumps to her death. And Rajesh, the recently-appointed head of the computer section, finds himself embroiled in an unexpected controversy as the police suspect him.

Will Rajesh be able to set himself free or is he actually guilty? Set against the backdrop of banking institutions, Ajay Jain’s book is a taut, racy thriller, with a new twist at every turn of the page that keeps the reader on edge.

3. Book: The Death House; Author: Sarah Pinborough; Publisher: Hachette; Pages: 273; Price: Rs. 399

A simple blood test changed Toby’s life. Now he lives in the death house, an out-of-time existence far from the modern world where others who live there are studied by doctors.

Toby spends his days fighting his fear and wondering how much he has left. But then a new arrival in the house shatters the fragile peace because everybody in the death house dies. What will happen to Toby? Read on to know!

4. Book: Chancing It; Author: Robert Mathews; Publisher: Hachette; Pages: 290; Price: Rs. 499

In the face of political upheaval, turmoil in financial markets and an endless litany of risks, threats and calamities, we all crave certainty. The need to understand chance, risk and uncertainty has never been more pronounced.

But one needs to accept the reality. This book, written by Robert Mathews, carries the central message that while one can never be free of chance, risk and uncertainty, one has the tools to take them on and win. (IANS)

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Reading with Your Children Can Make You a Better Parent, Say Researchers

The results showed that frequent shared reading at age 1 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 3, and frequent shared reading at age 3 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 5

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Reading
Toddler reading a book. Pixabay
People who regularly read with their kids are less likely to engage in harsh parenting and their children are less likely to be hyperactive and have attention problems, say researchers.
The study, published in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, suggests additional benefits from shared reading — a stronger parent-child bond.
“For parents, the simple routine of reading with your child on a daily basis provides not just academic but emotional benefits that can help bolster the child’s success in school and beyond,” said study lead researcher Manuel Jimenez, Assistant Professor at Rutgers University in the US.
“Our findings can be applied to programmes that help parents and care givers in underserved areas to develop positive parenting skills,” Jimenez said.
Family gathers for reading Ramayana. Image Source: The Hindu
For the study, the research team reviewed data on over 2,000 mother-child pairs from 20 large US cities in which the women were asked how often they read to their children at ages 1 and or 3.
The mothers were re-interviewed two years later, about how often they engaged in physically and/or psychologically aggressive discipline and about their children’s behaviour.
The results showed that frequent shared reading at age 1 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 3, and frequent shared reading at age 3 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 5.
Mothers who read frequently with their children also reported fewer disruptive behaviours from their children, which may partially explain the reduction in harsh parenting behaviours, said the study. (IANS)