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Nanking Massacre’s haunting still afresh, even after 80 years

It was the second Sino-Japanese War, which started in 1937 and resulted in a large number of deaths at the hands of the Japanese army.

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Nanking massacre
Nanking Massacre is considered a blot on the Japanese army. Wikimedia commons

NEW DELHI: On December 13, Chinese marked the 80th anniversary of the Nanking massacre. This day is considered as a very unfortunate knot between the relationship of Japan and China.

The event was attended by the Chinese President Xi Jinping in Nanking city. It was the second time that Chinese president attended the event, since first national memorial day for the massacre in 2014. But surprisingly, Jinping didn’t deliver any speech.

Generally, Jinping leaves no chance to address his people on such occasions. But this time, he refrained himself from making any comment. This act may be due to the ongoing cordial relationship between China and Japan, which maybe get into turmoil due to any political
statement.

The Japanese supreme, Shinzo Abe, and Xi Jinping met last month on the sidelines of a regional summit in Vietnam. Both of them greeted each other well and looked comfortable exchanging a few words.

It was the second Sino-Japanese War, which started in 1937 and resulted in a large number of deaths at the hands of the Japanese army. The people involved in the massacre included Chinese war prisoners and civilians.

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Chinese war prisoners and civilians felt the burnt of massacre

The Japanese impounded the Nanking city on December 13. 1937 and the rest is history. The atrocities of the Japanese army, accompanied by brutal methods led to large-scale uncalled death.

As far as the death toll of the Nanking Massacre incident is concerned, both the nations share a different point of views. Chinese historians claim the figure of more than three lakhs. Meanwhile, Japan counts the number ranging from few thousands to around two lakhs. But some conservative Japanese scholars even deny the very act of massacre even.

With the agenda of peace and regional balance in mind, both the nation will try to bury the past ghost of Nanking city in the coming years. Such incidents are really very hard to fade away from the memories of people of any nation.

To aim for the global presence, China will definitely try to mend its relations with its neighbors and by digging into such historical events will not help towards it.

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China Exchanged Data With NASA On Its Recent Mission To Moon

The country has also said that it will welcome scientists and astronauts from around the world to make use of its space station, which is slated for completion by 2022.

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Wu Yanhua, deputy director of the national space agency, speaks during a press conference held in Beijing, China, Jan. 14, 2019. VOA

China exchanged data with NASA on its recent mission to land a Chinese spacecraft on the far side of the moon, the Chinese space agency said Monday, in what was reportedly the first such collaboration since an American law banned joint space projects with China that do not have prior congressional approval.

The space agency’s deputy director, Wu Yanhua, said NASA shared information about its lunar orbiter satellite in hopes of monitoring the landing of the Chang’e 4 spacecraft, which made China the first country to land on the far side of the moon earlier this month.

China in turn shared the time and coordinates of Chang’e 4’s scheduled landing, Wu told reporters during a briefing on the lunar mission. He added that while NASA’s satellite did not catch the precise moment of landing, it took photographs of the area afterward.

The state-run China Daily said that was the first such form of cooperation since the 2011 U.S. law was enacted.

Moon, China
The far side of the moon, photographed by the Chang’e-4 lunar probe, is seen in this image provided by China National Space Administration, Jan. 3, 2019. VOA

NASA has not published any statements on the collaboration and could not immediately be reached for comment.

The lunar mission by Chang’e 4 and its rover, Jade Rabbit 2, was a triumph for China’s growing space program, which has been rapidly catching up with those of Russia and the U.S. President Xi Jinping has placed space exploration among the country’s national development priorities and the far side mission offered a chance for China to do something not done before by any other country.

The far side of the moon – the side which faces away from Earth – posed a challenge for scientists because it is beyond radio signals’ reach. China set up a relay satellite in May to receive communication from Chang’e 4.

“In the past, we were always rushing to catch up to the advanced global standards” in space, said Wu Weiren, the chief designer of China’s lunar exploration project.

“There were many things to catch up on, and fewer things in which we could surpass others,” he said. “With the probe of the far side of the moon this time, Chinese people have done very well.”

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This picture taken Jan. 3, 2019, and received, Jan. 4, from the China National Space Administration (CNSA) via CNS shows a robotic lunar rover on the far side of the moon. VOA

Officials at the briefing declined to give specific figures on the costs of the space program.

Wu Yanhua said the Chang’e 4 was originally built as a “backup product” for Chang’e 3. He said the spending needed to refit it for its new objective was akin to repairing a short section of subway line.

Also Read: NASA Telescopes Capture Birth of Black Hole or Neutron Star

Around the end of this year, China plans to launch Chang’e 5, which is to collect and bring back samples from the near side of the moon, the first time that has been done since 1976. Scientists are still researching whether to send Chinese astronauts, Wu said.

The country has also said that it will welcome scientists and astronauts from around the world to make use of its space station, which is slated for completion by 2022. (VOA)