Wednesday April 24, 2019

Researchers Develop Nano Technology That Offers Hope For Better Cancer Testing

The study has been published in the journal Advanced Materials

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Nano technology offers hope for better cancer testing. Pixabay

Researchers have designed a new nano tool which could become a new way of mining blood samples for information about cancer, according to a study released on Wednesday by the University of Manchester.

Minimally invasive blood tests have the potential to detect and monitor life-threatening diseases such as cancer. But the markers released into the bloodstream as a response to a disease are often difficult to detect because they are too small and too few in number, Xinhua news agency reported.

The study, led by researchers from the University of Manchester showed that small molecules — specifically proteins — stick to the nanoparticles while in the blood circulation of cancer patients. Collecting the nanoparticles from the blood can then allow the analysis of the sticky molecules, some of which are released from the growing cancer.

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Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

“We want to amplify cancer signals in the blood that would otherwise be buried among all this other ‘molecular noise’,” said study author Prof Kostas Kostarelos from Manchester.

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“Our team hopes to discover panels of biomolecules that can point to early warning signs of cancer which will provide the basis for the development of new diagnostic tests”, said Prof Kostarelos.

The study has been published in the journal Advanced Materials. (IANS)

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Research Reveals, Cancer Patients Are More Likely To Use Marijuana

"Medical marijuana legislation has previously been associated with reduction in hospitalisations related to opioid dependence or abuse, suggesting if patients are in fact substituting marijuana for opioid, this may introduce an opportunity for reducing opioid-related morbidity and mortality,"

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The researchers found significantly increased use of marijuana over time -- likely reflecting increased availability due to legislative changes -- but they found stable rates of opioid use. Pixabay

Many cancer patients use marijuana and its usage has increased, a new study suggests. The findings, published in the journal CANCER, indicate 40.3 per cent cancer patients used marijuana within the past year, compared with 38 per cent of respondents without cancer.

“Prospective clinical trials are needed to quantify the efficacy of marijuana in cancer-specific pain as well as the risk of opioid misuse in this patient population,” said co-author Kathryn Ries Tringale from the University of California, San Diego.

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They found patients with cancer were more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer — 13.9 per cent versus 6.4 per cent. Pixabay

For the study, 826 people with cancer were matched to 1,652 controls.

The researchers found significantly increased use of marijuana over time — likely reflecting increased availability due to legislative changes — but they found stable rates of opioid use.

Doctor

“Prospective clinical trials are needed to quantify the efficacy of marijuana in cancer-specific pain as well as the risk of opioid misuse in this patient population,” said co-author Kathryn Ries Tringale from the University of California, San Diego. VOA

They found patients with cancer were more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer — 13.9 per cent versus 6.4 per cent.

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“Medical marijuana legislation has previously been associated with reduction in hospitalisations related to opioid dependence or abuse, suggesting if patients are in fact substituting marijuana for opioid, this may introduce an opportunity for reducing opioid-related morbidity and mortality,” said lead author Jona Hattangadi-Gluth from the varsity. (IANS)