Sunday December 16, 2018

Researchers Develop Nano Technology That Offers Hope For Better Cancer Testing

The study has been published in the journal Advanced Materials

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Nano technology offers hope for better cancer testing. Pixabay
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Researchers have designed a new nano tool which could become a new way of mining blood samples for information about cancer, according to a study released on Wednesday by the University of Manchester.

Minimally invasive blood tests have the potential to detect and monitor life-threatening diseases such as cancer. But the markers released into the bloodstream as a response to a disease are often difficult to detect because they are too small and too few in number, Xinhua news agency reported.

The study, led by researchers from the University of Manchester showed that small molecules — specifically proteins — stick to the nanoparticles while in the blood circulation of cancer patients. Collecting the nanoparticles from the blood can then allow the analysis of the sticky molecules, some of which are released from the growing cancer.

Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

“We want to amplify cancer signals in the blood that would otherwise be buried among all this other ‘molecular noise’,” said study author Prof Kostas Kostarelos from Manchester.

Also read- NASA’s InSight Collecting Sunlight on The Martian Surface

“Our team hopes to discover panels of biomolecules that can point to early warning signs of cancer which will provide the basis for the development of new diagnostic tests”, said Prof Kostarelos.

The study has been published in the journal Advanced Materials. (IANS)

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World’s Smallest Wearable Can Help in Preventing Skin Cancer

It also demonstrated the ability to measure white light exposure for seasonal depression, a mood disorder characterised by depression that occurs at the same time every year

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World's smallest device to prevent skin cancer, mood disorder risk. Pixabay

Scientists have developed the world’s smallest wearable, battery-free device that can warn people of overexposure to ultraviolet rays (UV) — a leading factor for developing skin cancer.

Currently, people do not know how much UV light they are actually getting. The rugged and waterproof device interacts wirelessly with the phone and helps maintain an awareness and for skin cancer survivors.

Smaller than an M&M (colourful button-shaped chocolates) and thinner than a credit card, the device can optimise treatment of neonatal jaundice, skin diseases, seasonal affective disorder and reduce risk of sunburns and skin cancer.

Users can glue the device on to their hats, clip it to sunglasses or stick it on their nail and can simultaneously record up to three separate wavelengths of light.

It is always on yet never needs to be recharged.

“There is a critical need for technologies that can accurately measure and promote safe UV exposure at a personalised level in natural environments,” said Steve Xu, from Northwestern University in the US.

Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

“We hope people with information about their UV exposure will develop healthier habits when out in the sun,” said Xu.

There are no switches or interfaces to wear out, and it is completely sealed in a thin layer of transparent plastic, the researchers stated, in the paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Participants who mounted device on themselves recorded multiple forms of light exposure during outdoor activities, even in the water.

Also Read- First NASA Probe to Return Asteroid Sample Reaches Destination

The findings showed that it monitored therapeutic UV light in clinical phototherapy booths for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (immune diseases) as well as blue light phototherapy for newborns with jaundice in the neonatal intensive care unit.

It also demonstrated the ability to measure white light exposure for seasonal depression, a mood disorder characterised by depression that occurs at the same time every year. (IANS)