Tuesday January 21, 2020

A Nap During The Day Can Lower High BP: Study

Further research is needed to validate these findings, the team noted

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BP-monitoring machine. Pixabay

Want to lower your high blood pressure? Taking a nap during the day may help reduce hypertension levels, besides increasing your energy levels and improving mood, finds a study.

The findings showed that taking a nap during the day was associated with an average 5 mm Hg drop in blood pressure.

In addition, for every 60 minutes of mid-day sleep, 24-hour average systolic (top number) blood pressure decreased by 3 mm Hg.

“Mid-day sleep appears to lower blood pressure levels at the same magnitude as other lifestyle changes,” said Manolis Kallistratos, cardiologist at the Asklepieion General Hospital in Voula in Greece.

“These findings are important because a drop in blood pressure as small as 2 mm Hg can reduce the risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack by up to 10 per cent,” said Kallistratos.

Blood Pressure
Mid-day nap can lower high BP. Flickr

Moreover, people who slept during the day had more favourable blood pressure numbers readings (128.7/76.2 versus 134.5/79.5 mm Hg) compared with those who did not.

“We obviously don’t want to encourage people to sleep for hours on end during the day, but on the other hand, they shouldn’t feel guilty if they can take a short nap, given the potential health benefits,” said Kallistratos.

The results will be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session in New Orleans.

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For the study, the team included 212 people aged 62 years on average with a mean blood pressure of 129.9 mm Hg.

Further research is needed to validate these findings, the team noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Drinking Lingonberry Juice may Regulate Blood Pressure: Study

Drinking this berry juice may lower blood pressure

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blood pressure
Long-term consumption of lingonberry juice lowers high blood pressure. Pixabay

Long-term consumption of lingonberry juice lowers high blood pressure and improves the functions of blood vessels, reveals an experimental study.

At some point in their lives, many people develop elevated blood pressure, even hypertension and functional disturbances in blood vessels related to low-grade inflammation.

In addition to drug therapies, nutrition has a key role in the management of these disorders.

Studies have shown that polyphenol-rich food reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Lingonberry, bilberry, cranberry and blackcurrant are excellent sources of polyphenols.

“Lingonberry juice is no substitute for medication, but it is a good dietary supplement,” said researcher Anne Kivimaki from University of Helsinki in Finland.

Both lingonberry and cranberry are part of the Vaccinium family of plants, just like bilberries blueberries and huckleberries.

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The juice does not prevent the age-related elevation of blood pressure. Pixabay

In her doctoral thesis, Kivimaki investigated the cardiovascular effects of cold-pressed lingonberry juice, cranberry juice and blackcurrant juice as drinking fluid for 8-10 weeks on genetically hypertensive rats (SHR).

Diluted lingonberry juice significantly lowered high blood pressure while juice that contained more polyphenols improved impaired blood vessel function to the level of healthy vessels, the results showed.

The juice did not prevent the age-related elevation of blood pressure typical to the hypertensive animal strain.

Lingonberry juice prevented the expression of genes associated with low-grade inflammation in the aorta. The effect of other berry juices was less marked, showed the findings.

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Underlying the effect is probably the reduction of low-grade inflammation as well as mechanisms related to the renin-angiotensin system, a central regulator of blood pressure, and the availability of nitric oxide, a local endothelial vasodilating factor, said the study. (IANS)