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Narendra Modi Accuses Congress of Doing Divisive Politics

Madhya Pradesh will go to the polls on November 28

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India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi gestures as he addresses a gathering in New Delhi, India. VOA

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Saturday accused the Congress of doing divisive politics and said the Congress is not fighting to come to power but to save face.

Addressing a public rally here, Narendra Modi said: “The state was surrounded by problems and it took the Bharatiya Janata Party 15 years to get it back on track. Now, an opportunity for a big leap has come.”

Modi, who is visiting the poll-bound state, said the Congress always did caste politics and is doing the same now also. It is dividing the society to gain votes.

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Prime Minister Narendra Modi (FILE PHOTO)

The Prime Minister also talked about the development of the state under Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan. He said issues including irrigation facilities, establishment of colleges, water scarcity were all tackled by the BJP government.

Attacking the Congress over involving his mother in politics, Modi said “the Congress doesn’t have issues and nor the power to compete, that is why they are abusing my mother” and urged the women to condemn those who abuse females.

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Narendra Modi reached Chhatarpur in a helicopter after visiting Khajuraho. He was welcomed by BJP leaders.

Madhya Pradesh will go to the polls on November 28. (IANS)

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Facebook Rolls out its Transparency Tools for Global Advertisers

In countries where Facebook is not yet detecting or reviewing these ads, “these tools provide their constituents with more information about who’s influencing their vote — and we suggest voters and local regulators hold these elected officials and influential groups accountable as well”

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FILE - An Indian man surfs a Facebook page at an Internet cafe in New Delhi, India, Feb. 9, 2016. VOA

Facebook has rolled out its transparency tools globally for advertisers wanting to place ads about social issues, elections or politics.

The social networkin0g platform already requires that advertisers get authorized and add disclaimers to political ads in over 50 countries and territories, including in India.

“Now we’re expanding proactive enforcement on these ads to countries where elections or regulations are approaching, starting with Ukraine, Singapore, Canada and Argentina,” Sarah Schiff, Product Manager at Facebook said in a blog post on Tuesday.

As part of the authorization process for advertisers, Facebook confirms their ID and allow them to disclose who is responsible for the ad, which will appear on the ad itself.

The ad and “Paid for by” disclaimer are placed in the Ad Library for seven years, along with more information such as range of spend and impressions, as well as demographics of who saw it.

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FILE – The logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York’s Times Square, March 29, 2018. VOA

“The authorization process will not change in countries where we’ve previously launched, and people who previously authorized will not need to reauthorize,” said the company.

“Beginning today, we will systematically detect and review ads in Ukraine and Canada through a combination of automated and human review. In Singapore and Argentina, we will begin enforcement within the next few months,” said Facebook which also plans to roll out the Ad Library Report in both of those countries after enforcement is in place.

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“We’re also rolling out access to our Ad Library API globally so regulators, journalists, watchdog groups and other people can analyze ads about social issues, elections or politics and help hold advertisers and Facebook accountable,” said Facebook.

In countries where Facebook is not yet detecting or reviewing these ads, “these tools provide their constituents with more information about who’s influencing their vote — and we suggest voters and local regulators hold these elected officials and influential groups accountable as well”. (IANS)