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NASA Offers Rs.12 Lakh to Stay in Bed for 2 Months

"We are interested in how to maintain the health and performance of man -- in space and on Earth," according to a statement translated from the DLR website for the project

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NASA, jupiter
NASA says Jupiter will make its closest approach to Earth in June. Pixabay

Love to lounge in bed and get paid for it? If you are German speaking, healthy and middle aged, NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) are ready to pay you $19,000 to lie in bed for two months.

The space agencies want Earth-bound volunteers to test how artificial gravity might help keep astronauts healthy in space, the CNET reported on Friday.

The prolonged bed rest is part of the “Artificial Gravity Bed Rest” study that launched this week into the effects of weightlessness on the human body.

The Phase-II, to be conducted by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) from September through December in Cologne, Germany, requires healthy as well as German speaking 12 men and 12 women aged between 24 and 55 years.

NASA, bed rest
The 24 men and women will spend their days and nights in beds angled downward by six degrees, propped up with their feet at an incline above their heads, with one shoulder touching the mattress at all times, the report said. Pixabay

“We are interested in how to maintain the health and performance of man — in space and on Earth,” according to a statement translated from the DLR website for the project.

If astronauts are to live for long periods in space, or on the moon and Mars, science needs effective measures to counteract bone and muscle atrophy.

The 24 men and women will spend their days and nights in beds angled downward by six degrees, propped up with their feet at an incline above their heads, with one shoulder touching the mattress at all times, the report said.

This position reduces blood flow to the extremities, like astronauts in space experience.

NASA, bed rest
If astronauts are to live for long periods in space, or on the moon and Mars, science needs effective measures to counteract bone and muscle atrophy. Pixabay

While astronauts currently stick to an intense exercise regimen to stay strong, the bed rest study will for the first time investigate the use of a so-called short-arm human centrifuge to generate artificial gravity and force blood back in the extremities, CNET noted.

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One group of study volunteers will be spun around in the centrifuge while the other group would not. The centrifugal force can be adjusted according to the subject’s size.

In addition to the 60 days required for bed rest, participants will stay an additional 29 days for acclimation and supervised recovery involving stretching, massage and physiotherapy, the report said. (VOA)

Next Story

Scientists Recreate Voice of an Egyptian Priest Who Lived 3,000 Years Ago

The researchers suggest that their proof-of-concept recreation of a vocal tract preserved over three millennia has implications for the way in which the past is presented to the public in the present

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Egyptian
The Egyptian priest Nesyamun lived during the politically volatile reign of the pharaoh Ramses XI over 3000 years ago, working as a scribe and priest at the state temple of Karnak in Thebes (modern Luxor). IANS

Scientists have succeeded in accurately reproducing the voice of an Egyptian priest who lived 3,000 years ago, thanks to the mummification process and the use of 3D printing technology.

The scientists created the 3-D printed vocal tract based on measurements of the precise dimensions of his extant vocal tract following computed tomography (CT) scanning.

The acoustic output is a single sound, falling between the vowels in the English words ‘bed’ and ‘bad’, according to the study published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The Egyptian priest Nesyamun lived during the politically volatile reign of the pharaoh Ramses XI over 3000 years ago, working as a scribe and priest at the state temple of Karnak in Thebes (modern Luxor).

His voice was an essential part of his ritual duties which involved spoken as well as sung elements. The precise dimensions of an individual’s vocal tract produce a unique sound. If the dimensions of a vocal tract can be established, vocal sounds can be synthesized by using a 3D-printed vocal tract and an electronic larynx.

Egyptian Art, Sarcophagus, Pharaoe, Ancient, Egypt
Scientists have succeeded in accurately reproducing the voice of an Egyptian priest who lived 3,000 years ago, thanks to the mummification process and the use of 3D printing technology. Pixabay

For this to be feasible, the soft tissue of the vocal tract needs to be reasonably intact. David Howard of University of London and his colleagues used non-destructive CT to confirm that a significant part of the structure of the larynx and throat of the mummified body of the Nesyamun remained intact as a result of the mummification process.

This allowed the authors to measure the vocal tract shape from CT images. Based on these measurements, the authors created a 3D-printed vocal tract for Nesyamun and used it with an artificial larynx commonly used in speech synthesis.

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The researchers suggest that their proof-of-concept recreation of a vocal tract preserved over three millennia has implications for the way in which the past is presented to the public in the present. It may provide an opportunity to hear the vocal tract output of an individual that lived in ancient times. (IANS)