Wednesday March 20, 2019
Home Lead Story NASA is Curre...

NASA is Currently Exploring Commercialising Operations

Bridenstine also noted that this could spread NASA's influence in pop culture, the report said

0
//
NASA, Hubble, Keplar, asteroids
Nasa's Opportunity rover might have 'died' on Mars. Flickr

NASA is exploring the feasibility of commercialising the agency’s operations in low Earth orbit to lower its costs while its eyes turn toward the Moon and Mars, the media reported.

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine has unveiled an “Advisory Council committee” that will explore some of these plans, which could include product endorsements from astronauts and even selling the naming rights to rockets and other spacecraft, the Engadget reported.

According to Mike Gold, head of the Committee, the committee would also consider scrapping “obsolete” regulations to let US astronauts support private activities aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Companies should not have to “turn to Russian cosmonauts” for private operations, suggesting that astronauts could even be involved in filming ads, he was quoted as saying.

Gold said the possibilities could include having NASA receive reimbursement when commercial space companies sell spots on spacecraft heading for the ISS, and leveraging those funds for access or services on future private-sector space stations.

NASA
NASA mulling product endorsements, selling naming rights. Pixabay

“Our companies should not have to turn to Russian cosmonauts to execute commercial operations,” Gold was quoted as saying by the GeekWire.

“When new industrial substance are created, commercial experiments conducted, or even advertisements filmed, American astronauts should lead the way.”

While Bridenstine stressed that he did not know if this kind of commercialisation was possible (hence the committee), he noted that the move might help NASA compete with private spaceflight companies.

Also Read- Report: Tesla Misses Model 3 Car Production Target

The US has a shortage of military pilots precisely because they can make more money with airlines, the administrator argued — there could be a similar problem if they’re tempted away by the likes of SpaceX — a California-based private aerospace manufacturer.

Bridenstine also noted that this could spread NASA’s influence in pop culture, the report said. (IANS)

Next Story

NASA Reveals First Person on Mars ‘is Likely to be a Woman’

NASA has come a long way since 1978, when the first six women joined NASA's astronaut corps

0
NASA, mars
NASA will also have its first all-female spacewalk at the end of the month, when astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch will get to float around in space. The spacewalk will last about seven hours, according to the US space agency. Pixabay

The first person on Mars is ‘likely to be a woman’, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine has said.

“It’s likely to be a woman, the first next person on the Moon. It’s also true that the first person on Mars is likely to be a woman,” CNN cited Bridenstine as saying on a science and technology radio talk show “Science Friday”.

The NASA administrator did not identify a specific person but said women are at the forefront of the agency’s upcoming plans.

NASA will also have its first all-female spacewalk at the end of the month, when astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch will get to float around in space. The spacewalk will last about seven hours, according to the US space agency.

NASA, mars
NASA has come a long way since 1978, when the first six women joined NASA’s astronaut corps. Currently, women comprise 34 per cent of its active astronauts, according to the agency. Pixabay

“So these are great days. We have the first all-female spacewalk happening this month at the end of March, which is of course, National Women’s Month,” Bridenstine said.

Both McClain and Koch were part of the 2013 astronaut class, half of which were women. They came from the second largest applicant pool NASA has ever received — more than 6,100. The most recent class of flight directors was also 50 per cent women, NASA said.

 

ALSO READ: NASA’s Future Scientists Would Likely Be Better Equipped To Study The Lunar Material

NASA has come a long way since 1978, when the first six women joined NASA’s astronaut corps. Currently, women comprise 34 per cent of its active astronauts, according to the agency.

“NASA is committed to making sure we have a broad and diverse set of talent and we’re looking forward to the first woman on the moon,” Bridenstine said. (IANS)