Sunday April 22, 2018

NASA’s Curiosity Rover discovers pyramid-like structure on Mars

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image courtesy: www.marsruins.com
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New York: Fuelling speculation that advanced civilization once thrived on Mars, NASA’s Curiosity rover has found a pyramid-like structure on the Red Planet, media reports said.

This image that bears an uncanny resemblance to the Great Pyramid in Egypt was captured by Mastcam: Right on-board NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on May 7.

Estimated to be the size of a small car, it could also be the capstone of a much larger pyramid buried beneath the Martian sand, Exopolitics reported.

This “pyramid” image has stargazers believing that intelligent life exists or once thrived on Mars, Starpulse.com said.

What stands out about the photograph is the straight-line geometry and symmetry of the structure.

A telltale sign that differentiates a natural formation from a man-made one is its angles and lines. In this case, the picture resembles smooth angular shapes that are equivalent in scope.

The pyramid is among the clearest photographic evidence collected so far that artificial structures exist on Mars built by an earlier civilization, the Exopolitics report said. (IANS)

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NASA’s Planet-Hunting Telescope Lifts Off In U.S.

Rocket with planet-hunting telescope finally lifts off

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NASA's next mission.
TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, is shown in this conceptual illustration obtained by Reuters on March 28, 2018. NASA sent TESS into orbit from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket April 18, 2018, on a two-year mission. VOA

A Falcon 9 rocket blasted off Wednesday carrying SpaceX’s first high-priority science mission for NASA, a planet-hunting space telescope whose launch had been delayed for two days by a rocket-guidance glitch.

The Transit Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, lifted off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 6:51 p.m. EDT, starting the clock on a two-year quest to detect more worlds circling stars beyond our solar system that might harbor life.

The main-stage booster successfully separated from the upper stage of the rocket and headed back to Earth on a self-guided return flight to an unmanned landing vessel floating in the Atlantic.

Also Read: Why NASA sent human sperm to space?

The first stage, which can be recycled for future flights, then landed safely on the ocean platform, according to SpaceX launch team announcers on NASA TV.

Liftoff followed a postponement forced by a technical glitch in the rocket’s guidance-control system.  VOA

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