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NASA’s InSight Lander Captures Low Rumble of Marsquakes and Symphony of Other Otherworldly Sounds

Scientists released an audio sampling Tuesday. The sounds had to be enhanced for humans to hear

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NASA, Marsquakes, Symphony
This April 25, 2019 photo made available by NASA shows the InSight lander's dome-covered seismometer on Mars. On Oct. 1, 2019, scientists released an audio sampling of marsquakes and other sounds recorded by the probe. VOA

NASA’s InSight lander on Mars has captured the low rumble of marsquakes and a symphony of other otherworldly sounds.

Scientists released an audio sampling Tuesday. The sounds had to be enhanced for humans to hear.

InSight’s seismometer has detected more than 100 events, but only 21 are considered strong marsquake candidates. The rest could be marsquakes — or something else. The French seismometer is so sensitive it can hear the Martian wind as well as movements by the lander’s robot arm and other mechanical “dinks and donks” as the team calls them.

“It’s been exciting, especially in the beginning, hearing the first vibrations from the lander,” said Imperial College London’s Constantinos Charalambous, who helped provide the audio recordings. “You’re imagining what’s really happening on Mars as InSight sits on the open landscape,” he added in a statement.

NASA, Marsquakes, Symphony
NASA’s InSight lander on Mars has captured the low rumble of marsquakes and a symphony of other otherworldly sounds. Pixabay

InSight arrived at Mars last November and recorded its first seismic rumbling in April.

A German drilling instrument, meanwhile, has been inactive for months. Scientists are trying to salvage the experiment to measure the planet’s internal temperature.

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The so-called mole is meant to penetrate 16 feet (5 meters) beneath the Martian surface, but has managed barely 1 foot (30 centimeters). Researchers suspect the Martian sand isn’t providing the necessary friction for digging, causing the mole to helplessly bounce around rather than burrow deeper, and to form a wide pit around itself. (VOA)

Next Story

NASA Plans To Unveil New Mission For Studying The Causes of Solar Particle Storms

"We are so pleased to add a new mission to our fleet of spacecraft that help us better understand the Sun, as well as how our star influences the space environment between planets," said Nicky Fox, Director of NASA's Heliophysics Division

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NASA
NASA has awarded $62.6 million to design, build and launch SunRISE by no earlier than July 1, 2023. Pixabay

NASA is planning to launch a new mission to study how the Sun generates and releases giant space weather storms — known as solar particle storms — into planetary space.

The new mission, called the Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE), is an array of six CubeSats operating as one very large radio telescope, the US space agency said on Monday. NASA has awarded $62.6 million to design, build and launch SunRISE by no earlier than July 1, 2023.

Understanding how the Sun generates and releases giant space weather storms can ultimately help protect astronauts travelling to the Moon and Mars by providing better information on how the Sun’s radiation affects the space environment they must travel through.

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“We are so pleased to add a new mission to our fleet of spacecraft that help us better understand the Sun, as well as how our star influences the space environment between planets,” said Nicky Fox, Director of NASA’s Heliophysics Division.

“The more we know about how the Sun erupts with space weather events, the more we can mitigate their effects on spacecraft and astronauts.” The mission design relies on six solar-powered CubeSats — each about the size of a toaster oven — to simultaneously observe radio images of low-frequency emission from solar activity and share them via NASA’s Deep Space Network.

The constellation of CubeSats would fly within six miles (9.6 kms) of each other, above Earth’s atmosphere, which otherwise blocks the radio signals SunRISE will observe.

Solar System
NASA is planning to launch a new mission to study how the Sun generates and releases giant space weather storms — known as solar particle storms — into planetary space. Pixabay

Together, the six CubeSats will create 3D maps to pinpoint where giant particle bursts originate on the Sun and how they evolve as they expand outward into space. This, in turn, will help determine what initiates and accelerates these giant jets of radiation.

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The six individual spacecraft will also work together to map, for the first time, the pattern of magnetic field lines reaching from the Sun out into interplanetary space, NASA said. (IANS)