Tuesday August 21, 2018

Nation’s Capital continues to choke on Hazardous Air, Over 200 Petitions demand Clean Air in Delhi

The US-based online petition platform 'Change.org', said that over 200 petitions were filed within 24 hours after the smog crisis hit Delhi on November 2

2
//
114
Polluted Delhi Air. VOA
Republish
Reprint

New Delhi, November 3, 2016: As the national capital continues to choke on hazardous air, more than 200 online petitioners have urged the Prime Minister to intervene and chalk out a solution for clean air in Delhi, Change.org said.

[bctt tweet=”The US-based online petition platform ‘Change.org’, said that over 200 petitions were filed within 24 hours after the smog crisis hit Delhi on November 2.” username=””]

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

It added that several other petitions were filed by people against Delhi’s pollution after Diwali.

“The biggest petition, titled Ban on crackers for the well being of the environment, which was started by Delhiresident Akshay Gaur, got more than 32,000 signatures in less than a day,” Nida, a Change.org spokesperson told IANS.

She added that another petition, which asked the Prime Minister to intervene, has collected over 3,000 signatures.

The petition points out, “This issue cannot be solved by one government agency as multiple states are involved – Delhi, Haryana, UP and Punjab. We, the citizens of NCR, demand that immediate steps be taken under leadership of the Prime Minister of India”.

The petitions filed on the Change.org are marked to the concerned person, law maker or authority. It works through consistent buzzes and mails to the person concerned as the number of signature increases. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Ruchika Kumari

    Pollution is the major cause of many diseases…..its our duty to keep our environment clean and healthy….otherwise very soon humans are also going to be extinct

  • Shivani Vohra

    Delhi’s air must be cleaned otherwise we all are in danger.

Next Story

Air Pollution Linked to Changes in Heart Structure

Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart, the findings showed

0
Air Pollution.
Air pollution may lead to changes in heart structure. Pixabay

Researchers have found that people exposed to even low levels of air pollution can have changes in the structure of the heart, similar to those seen in the early stages of heart failure.

For every one extra microgram per cubic metre of PM2.5 — small particles of air pollution — and for every 10 extra microgram per cubic metre of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), the heart enlarges by approximately 1 per cent, showed the findings of the Britain-based study published in the journal Circulation.

“Although our study was observational and hasn’t yet shown a causal link, we saw significant changes in the heart, even at relatively low levels of air pollution exposure,” said one of the researchers Nay Aung from Queen Mary University of London.

For the study, the researchers looked at data from around 4,000 participants in the UK Biobank study, where volunteers provided a range of personal information, including their lifestyles, health record and details on where they have lived.

Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart,
Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart. Pixabay

Participants also had blood tests and health scans, and heart MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) was used to measure the size, weight and function of the participants’ hearts at fixed times.

The team found a clear association between those who lived near loud, busy roads, and were exposed to nitrogen dioxide or PM2.5 and the development of larger right and left ventricles in the heart.

Also Read: Air Pollution Linked to 3.2 Million New Diabetes Cases in One Year

The ventricles are important pumping chambers in the heart and, although these participants were healthy and had no symptoms, similar heart remodelling is seen in the early stages of heart failure.

Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart, the findings showed. (IANS)