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Natural Choices to Combat Ageing

Accelerating ageing is affected by the following:

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Natural Choices to Combat Ageing
Natural Choices to Combat Ageing. Pixabay
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Ageing begins from when a child is born. However, there are other factors that can lead to premature ageing, including the usage of incorrect skincare products and gorging on unhealthy foods. One can achieve a perfect skin by including turmeric, ginger and green leafy vegetables in the food intake, says an expert.

Speaking at the Anti-Ageing Health and Beauty show, held at the London Olympia this past weekend, Geraldine McCulgan of the College of Naturopathic Medicine said: “What you eat today… you wear tomorrow.”

The beauty therapist shared some helpful tips on natural choices for anti-ageing and the small changes that one can effect in one’s lifestyle to help slow down ageing.

Accelerating ageing is affected by the following:

* Glycation – the process of sugar and it affects joints

* Inflammation

* Lack of nutrients

* Overload of toxins

* Free radical damages

* Stress

* Loss of ATP (Adenosine triphosphate) which regulates cellular energy

* Lack of oil and water

So if you want to slow down ageing, McCulgan recommends following a diet made up of whole grains, vegetables, legumes, mild-sweet and non-sweet fruits. One can also try the following things:

Avoid refined sugar
Avoid refined sugar. Pixabay

* Avoid refined sugar

* Eat protein with every meal

* Swap refined sugar products with wholegrain alternatives

* Eat plenty of fibre rich vegetables

* Include cinnamon – lowers blood sugar levels

* Consult the ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) scale – which identifies the anti-oxidants in foods

Also Read: Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing

Inflammation is behind many degenerative diseases, so here we have some advice from Geraldine on how to reduce it:

* Eat organic

* Turmeric

* Ginger

* Green leafy vegetables

* Fermented foods

* Acid/Alkaline balancing

* Omega 3 fatty acids (Bollywood Country)

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Commonly Used Antidepressant Can Help Delay Ageing of Brain Cells, Says Study

In the new study, appearing in the Journal of Neuroscience, they put the drug in the drinking water of mice at various ages for various amounts of time

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Aspirin
Aspirin may lower risk of ovarian cancer. Pixabay

Administering commonly used antidepressant fluoxetine to mice helped restore youthful flexibility to their ageing brain cells, showed a study.

The study provides fresh evidence that the decline in the capacity of brain cells to change, called “plasticity,” rather than a decline in total cell numbers may underlie some of the sensory and cognitive declines associated with normal brain ageing.

Scientists at the MIT revealed that in mice treated with fluoxetine, also known as Prozac, the inhibitory interneurons in the visual cortex remained just as abundant during ageing, but their arbors become simplified and they become much less structurally dynamic and flexible.

They could also restore a significant degree of lost plasticity to the cells.

“Here we show that fluoxetine can also ameliorate the age-related decline in structural and functional plasticity of visual cortex neurons,” said the scientists including lead author Ronen Eavri from MIT.

antidepressant
Administering commonly used antidepressant fluoxetine to mice helped restore youthful flexibility to their ageing brain cells.
 “Our finding that fluoxetine treatment in ageing mice can attenuate the concurrent age-related declines in interneuron structural and visual cortex functional plasticity suggests it could provide an important therapeutic approach towards mitigation of sensory and cognitive deficits associated with ageing, provided it is initiated before severe network deterioration,” they added.

A previous study had shown that fluoxetine promotes interneuron branch remodelling in young mice, so the team decided to see whether it could do so for older mice and restore plasticity as well.

In the new study, appearing in the Journal of Neuroscience, they put the drug in the drinking water of mice at various ages for various amounts of time.

Also Read- Farhan Akhtar urges West Bengal to Correct a ‘Glaring Error’

Three-month-old mice treated for three months showed little change in dendrite growth compared to untreated controls, but 25 per cent of the cells in six-month-old mice treated for three months showed significant new growth (at the age of 9 months).

But among 3-month-old mice treated for six months, 67 per cent of cells showed new growth by the age of 9 months, showing that treatment starting early and lasting for six months had the strongest effect. (IANS)