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Natural Choices to Combat Ageing

Accelerating ageing is affected by the following:

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Natural Choices to Combat Ageing
Natural Choices to Combat Ageing. Pixabay

Ageing begins from when a child is born. However, there are other factors that can lead to premature ageing, including the usage of incorrect skincare products and gorging on unhealthy foods. One can achieve a perfect skin by including turmeric, ginger and green leafy vegetables in the food intake, says an expert.

Speaking at the Anti-Ageing Health and Beauty show, held at the London Olympia this past weekend, Geraldine McCulgan of the College of Naturopathic Medicine said: “What you eat today… you wear tomorrow.”

The beauty therapist shared some helpful tips on natural choices for anti-ageing and the small changes that one can effect in one’s lifestyle to help slow down ageing.

Accelerating ageing is affected by the following:

* Glycation – the process of sugar and it affects joints

* Inflammation

* Lack of nutrients

* Overload of toxins

* Free radical damages

* Stress

* Loss of ATP (Adenosine triphosphate) which regulates cellular energy

* Lack of oil and water

So if you want to slow down ageing, McCulgan recommends following a diet made up of whole grains, vegetables, legumes, mild-sweet and non-sweet fruits. One can also try the following things:

Avoid refined sugar
Avoid refined sugar. Pixabay

* Avoid refined sugar

* Eat protein with every meal

* Swap refined sugar products with wholegrain alternatives

* Eat plenty of fibre rich vegetables

* Include cinnamon – lowers blood sugar levels

* Consult the ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) scale – which identifies the anti-oxidants in foods

Also Read: Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing

Inflammation is behind many degenerative diseases, so here we have some advice from Geraldine on how to reduce it:

* Eat organic

* Turmeric

* Ginger

* Green leafy vegetables

* Fermented foods

* Acid/Alkaline balancing

* Omega 3 fatty acids (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Microorganisms Living In The Gut May Alter The Ageing Process

A new study says that the microorganisms found living in the gut may alter ageing process

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Microorganisms
Researchers have found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process. Pixabay

Researchers have found that microorganisms living in the gut may alter the ageing process, which could lead to the development of food-based treatment to slow it down.

All living organisms, including human beings, coexist with a myriad of microbial species living in and on them, and research conducted over the last 20 years has established their important role in nutrition, physiology, metabolism and behaviour.

“We’ve found that microbes collected from an old mouse have the capacity to support neural growth in a younger mouse,” said study researcher Sven Pettersson from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

“This is a surprising and very interesting observation, especially since we can mimic the neuro-stimulatory effect by using butyrate alone,” Pettersson added.

Using mice, the research team transplanted gut microbes from old mice (24 months old) into young, germ-free mice (six weeks old).

After eight weeks, the young mice had increased intestinal growth and production of neurons in the brain, known as neurogenesis.

The team showed that the increased neurogenesis was due to an enrichment of gut microbes that produce a specific short chain fatty acid, called butyrate.

Butyrate is produced through microbial fermentation of dietary fibres in the lower intestinal tract and stimulates production of a pro-longevity hormone called FGF21, which plays an important role in regulating the body’s energy and metabolism.

Microorganisms, mice
Using mice, the research team transplanted gut microorganisms from old mice into young, germ-free mice. Pixabay

As we age, butyrate production is reduced.

The researchers then showed that giving butyrate on its own to the young germ-free mice had the same adult neurogenesis effects.

“These results will lead us to explore whether butyrate might support repair and rebuilding in situations like stroke, spinal damage and to attenuate accelerated ageing and cognitive decline,” Pettersson said.

The team also explored the effects of gut microbe transplants from old to young mice on the functions of the digestive system.

With age, the viability of small intestinal cells is reduced, and this is associated with reduced mucus production that make intestinal cells more vulnerable to damage and cell death.

However, the addition of butyrate helps to better regulate the intestinal barrier function and reduce the risk of inflammation.

Also Read- Syska Launches An Anti-Bacterial LED Bulb

The team found that mice receiving microbes from the old donor gained increases in length and width of the intestinal villi – the wall of the small intestine. In addition, both the small intestine and colon were longer in the old mice than the young germ-free mice.

The discovery shows that gut microbes can compensate and support an ageing body through positive stimulation. (IANS)