Wednesday May 22, 2019
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NDDB accounts for 90 percent of milk production in India: T Nanda Kumar

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By Nityanand Shukla

Ranchi: The National Dairy Development Board (NDDB) involves around a million farmers in its activities. A top official revealed the Board earning a profit of Rs. 15-20 per liter by selling milk to its various federations.

T Nanda Kumar, chairman of National Dairy Development Board (NDDB), said Gujarat topped the list in milk production followed by Karnataka. The total milk production in the country was over 140 million tonnes in 2014-15.

Nanda Kumar said the National Dairy Plan-1, now into its third year, is being implemented in 15 states, which account for more than 90 percent of the country’s milk production, over 87 percent of the breedable cattle and 98 percent of the country’s fodder resources.

Initially, NDP-I was approved for implementation in 14 milk potential states by the NDDB with a total outlay of Rs.2,242 crore for a period of six years from 2011-12 to 2016-17. Now the implementation period has been extended by two years till 2018-19 to achieve key outputs.

Nanda Kumar informed that NDDB now procures 400 million liters of milk and the two-year extension would help in achieving the desired results.

He said the government last June decided to include the three states of Uttarakhand, Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh that were formed in 2000 under NDP-1.

“It is extremely important to develop these three states, where poverty is an issue, as dairy development benefits the states socio-economically,” Nanda Kumar told reporters.

The NDDB had taken up the management of the Jharkhand State Cooperative Milk Producers Federation Limited in 2014, which has been selling milk under the Medha brand for five years.

“Once the 100,000-litre milk processing plant in Ranchi becomes operational, more and more farmers would be joining the state milk federation because of increase in price realization,” he said.

“More than 20,000 farmers would be getting the higher remunerative price at around Rs.27-Rs.28 per liter against Rs.16-Rs.17 per liter they used to get when private players used to procure milk from them,” he said.

The board has set up milk storage plants at 370 villages, where farmers from around 600 villages bring in their milk daily for purchase by the state milk federation.

However, in Jharkhand, power was a major constraint and the expenses get escalated as diesel-run milk coolers have to be pressed into service.

He said milk consumption was less in the eastern region, including Jharkhand and Assam.

NDDB, founded by Verghese Kurien, in 1965, fulfilled the desire of India’s second prime minister, Lal Bahadur Shastri, to extend the success of the Anand Cooperative Milk Producers’ Union (Amul) in Kaira, Gujarat, to other parts of India. (IANS) (Image source: thegaurdian.com)

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Public Safety Threatened As Stray Cattle Takes To The Street in Agra

District authorities in Agra, Mathura and Aligarh have had a series of meetings to resolve this problem.

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Cows, Pixabay

Bulls and cows are a growing nuisance and pose a threat to public safety in several districts of Agra.

From bulls going on the rampage and attacking humans, to stray cattle entering fields and destroying crops to the fear of cow vigilantes after the ban on cow slaughter, the stray cattle menace is leading to resentment among all.

On Friday, a 22-year-old motorcycle rider was killed after being hit by a bull on Fatehabad road.

In Etmadpur and other areas, farmers locked cows and bulls in schools and government health centres as the animals routinely enter farmlands and destroy standing crops.

Above all, tension prevails in the neighbouring Iglas town of Aligarh after a dozen cows were found buried alive in a dry canal.

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Police sent to villages to drive away the cattle. Pixabay

Cow vigilantes have demanded firm action but so far no arrests have been made.

“Our labour and resources are all going waste because of hundreds of cows entering our fields and destroying our crops,” complained Ram Bharosey, a villager in Farah block in Mathura.

In the past one week, there have been half a dozen incidents of desperate and frustrated farmers locking stray cattle in government schools.

“Children have had to miss classes as there is no space and there are only cows in the school complex,” said Anek Singh, a farmer.

Catttle, cow
Indian cow. Pixabay

Police sent to villages to drive away the cattle have had to face the ire of the locals who want the Yogi government to urgently open gaushalas (cow shelters).

“The bovine population has suddenly multiplied. Groups of villagers with lathis in hand have to patrol villages to drive cows away. If you do not keep vigil, the crops would be gone in a few hours,” Subhash, a village level worker, said.

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District authorities in Agra, Mathura and Aligarh have had a series of meetings to resolve this problem. Gram panchayats have been asked to earmark pasture land and provide support to gaushalas.

“In this extremely cold weather, villagers are forced to spend the whole night in the fields to keep the animals away,” said a farmer. (IANS)