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Why lasting peace along the borders of Assam and Nagaland is an elusive dream

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credits: mountainkingdoms.com

By Partha Prawal

The history of border dispute between Assam and Nagaland dates back to centuries ago and in the recent times these disputes have only grown in stature, where both sides keep pointing fingers at each other. Hundreds of lives have been lost so far and the numbers continue to pile up.

Sibsagar, Golaghat and Jorhat districts of Assam share its borders with Nagaland and reports of violence in the fringe areas alongside the border areas keep making headlines.

On November 13, 2014, one person was killed and three others injured when Naga miscreants fired indiscriminately on a group of Assamese villagers at Uriamghat, Sector B, along Assam-Nagaland border in Golaghat district. There are reports that nine persons went missing. This November 13 incident was a recurrence of August 13, 2014, incident that took place in the same area of the district. Around 5000 people were rendered homeless back then.

If an outsider is made to read such incidents, then he is bound to believe that peace and harmony along the border areas of Assam-Nagaland is just an elusive dream. But amid such disparity, a hamlet in Saibsagar district tells a different tale where peace harmony and brotherhood always find space in the front row.

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“These killings are senseless and they bring no benefit to anybody,” remarked Samson Konyak, a resident of Sibsagar district’s ‘Naga Village’, in a telephonic conversation.

“Even though we are Nagas by birth and still have our clan back in Dimapur, Mon and Kohima, feel proud of ourselves and we take pride in introducing ourselves as Assamese. The people in the border areas are actually catalyzed by some politicos and officials with vested interests,” the 23-year-old management student from the village further added.

The Naga Village is 15 kilometres from Sivasagar town. Even though the name gives an impression that it will be a small community of Naga people trying to blend their culture with that of the Assamese, but a half an hour bike ride on the Sivasagar-Nazira road to this now declared ‘model village’ is certain to change the preconceived impression for sure.

indialine.comThe village roughly has some 70-80 Konyak Naga families, who not only follow the traditional Naga customs, but are also comfortable with the Assamese way of life.

Established as early as 16-17th century, the village has survived many storms to stand united today. The village population is primarily Vaishnavite, following the religious cult of Srimanta Sankardeva.

 

“We are the disciples of the Guru of Moira Moira Sattra, as our forefathers got converted to  Vaishnavism when they first came to the place. Since then, we have followed the same custom and have remained Vaishnavites,” said Montu Konyak, a resident of the village.

While a few families came with the guru, a few are the descendants of those businessmen who came from Naga Hills and left their clan behind. The majority though, had come with the Naga Princess Watlong (popularly known as the Ahom Queen Dalimi), wife of Ahom king Gadadha.

“We have relatives in Kohima, Dimapur and various other places in Nagaland. When we go there, we receive a warm reception. All these border issues and political unrest between the two states, doesn’t bother us. After all, a Naga princess was an Assamese queen and this means that the Nagas and the Assamese are relatives. This is not Mahabharata and neither is someone a Pandava nor a Kaurava. We are not enemies,” remarks another resident.

The Naga village celebrates six to seven traditional festivals every year, but the biggest of all is Aoleng, which is celebrated mostly during the spring season.

“Aoleng is celebrated according to the new moon and is celebrated to mark the end of a year and to welcome the New Year. Apart from Aoleng, we also celebrate Magh Bihu, Bohag Bihu, Janmastami, Durga Puja and Kali Puja with equal respect,” further informed Montu, a resident of the village.

Like the villages in Nagaland, the traditional and religious Naga customs are followed here as well. The village is under one Morung Ghar and anything auspicious or any news of the interest of the village is shared in its premises, after gathering a crowd by beating the log drum.

“It is a Naga custom that every Naga boy in a village has to offer his services to the Morung Ghar for a year and we also follow this custom,” shared Montu.

But despite all this loyalty to their Assamese identity, there are times when these Nagas feel a little alienated. Sometimes they feel that the Assam government is yet to give them due recognition as Assamese. A government job still eludes many.

“A girl from the village was denied the post of an Assamese teacher in a local school, even though she topped the university in the Assamese subject; a less qualified candidate was given the job. Expect for her surname, there was nothing non-Assamese in her for the job to be denied to her,” bemoaned Samson.

Border issues, political struggles and ethnic dominion maybe eating away the fabric of camaraderie between states, but the real picture when it comes to the common man seems to be rather different. That one needs acknowledgement and respect for such intercultural mingling and coexistence of course goes unsaid, but it is also true that the state government needs to offer something more tangible than promises in the air.

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  • Pollob Protim Goswamee

    It was a good read, a different story altogether. What we mostly hear is abut the negative and grey stories about Assam-Nagaland border violence but this story throws a completely different perspective even though the headline suggested something else. Good job Partha Prawal, keep the good job up.

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  • Pollob Protim Goswamee

    It was a good read, a different story altogether. What we mostly hear is abut the negative and grey stories about Assam-Nagaland border violence but this story throws a completely different perspective even though the headline suggested something else. Good job Partha Prawal, keep the good job up.

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Tea Body of Assam Slam ‘Chaiwala’ Modi

The tea labourers of Assam live in the most deplorable conditions without some of the basic amenities, Gowala said

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Narendra-Modi
Assam tea body slam 'chaiwala' Modi,

The largest tea body of Assam on Sunday slammed Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who often refer to himself as a “chaiwala”, for not being considerate towards the state’s tea garden workers’ plight and urged him to implement the promised minimum wage of Rs 350 before the new year starts.

The Assam Chah Mazdoor Sangha (ACMS) General Secretary Rupesh Gowala said while Modi often refers to himself as a “chaiwala”, he is yet make good on his promises towards a million tea garden labourers in the state in the last four years.

“Before the Lok Sabha elections of 2014, Modi addressed several rallies in Assam and assured that the tea garden labourers would be paid a minimum wage of Rs 350 per day,” Gowala said.

“If this happens, the 10,00,000 tea garden labourers will lose Rs 30 each day for two months. Is it a “chaiwala” Prime Minister who is doing this to his own community?” said Gowala.

The tea garden workers in Brahmaputra Valley in Assam are presently drawing Rs 167 per day while the tea garden workers in Barak Valley are getting Rs 145 per day.

“The existing wage agreement between the Assam government and the ACMS and other tea workers bodies expired on December 31, 2017.

Narendra Modi
Narendra Modi (Wikimedia Commons)

“The government had announced an interim hike of Rs 30 per day. The tea garden labourers are supposed to get this interim hike from January 1, 2018, but the government is saying the hike will apply from March 1, 2018.

“This would make them lose Rs 30 per day for two months,” he said.

The Bharatiya Janata Party-led government in Assam is yet to fix that minimum wage, Gowala said, urging Modi to announce the promised Rs 350 per day minimum wage before 2019.

Gowala said the condition of all those tea gardens run by the Assam government was far worse.

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“While the labourers in company-owned garden are receiving a wage of Rs. 167 per day now, the 26,000 workers under the 14 gardens of state-owned Assam Tea Company Limited (ATCL) are receiving a wage of Rs 115 only per day,” he said.

Assam has over 800 medium and large size tea gardens that produces over 50 per cent of the country’s total tea produce.

The tea labourers of Assam live in the most deplorable conditions without some of the basic amenities, Gowala said. (IANS)