Tuesday February 19, 2019

Study Shows That Childhood Friendships Can be Affected by Negative Parenting

Negative features of parenting, such as depression and psychological control, increasing the risk of breaking up childhood friendships, finds a study. The results showed that for children with clinically depressed parents, the risk of best friendship dissolution increased by up to 104 percent, Xinhua reported.

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Parents
Proper eating habits are a must for all the children to learn during their childhood. pixabay

Negative features of parenting, such as depression and psychological control, increasing the risk of breaking up childhood friendships, finds a study.

The results showed that for children with clinically depressed parents, the risk of best friendship dissolution increased by up to 104 percent, Xinhua reported.

There was a similar, although not quite as dramatic, increase in the risk of best friendship dissolution for children with psychologically controlling parents.

Parent depression and parent psychological control uniquely predicted subsequent child friendships breaking up, above and beyond contributions of peer difficulties.

There was a similar, although not quite as dramatic, increase in the risk of best friendship dissolution for children with psychologically controlling parents.
Representational image, pixabay

“We already know that peer status plays an important role in friendship outcomes. For example, well-liked children have more long-lasting relationships than do their classmates,” said Brett Laursen, Professor at Florida Atlantic University (FAU), US.

But “children with depressed and psychologically controlling parents are not learning healthy strategies for engaging with other people, which could have long-term consequences for their future relationships”, Laursen added.

However, contrary to the researchers’ expectations, there were no evidence that positive parenting behaviours like warmth and affection altered the stability of children’s best friendships.

contrary to the researchers' expectations, there were no evidence that positive parenting behaviours like warmth and affection altered the stability of children's best friendships
Family, pixabay

“We were hoping that positive behaviours would help extend the life of friendships and that it would be a buffer or a protective factor,” said Laursen.

“This was not the case. Warmth and affection don’t appear to make that much of a difference. It is the negative characteristics of parents that are key in determining if and when these childhood friendships end,” he noted.

For the study, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, the team looked at 1,523 children. Among them 766 were boys, from grades one to six. They conducted a survival analysis to identify the characteristics of parents that predict the stability of their children’s friendships.

Also Read: Affects of Prenatal Marijuana on Baby

The researchers also examined the parenting styles to predict the occurrence and timing of the dissolution of kids’ best friendships from the beginning to the end of elementary school (grades one to six).

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Conflicts with Your Mother in Childhood May Reduce Purpose in Life Later

Only the child's perspective seemed to matter

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mother
Mother-daughter conflict ups suicide risk in abused teen girls: Study. Pixabay

Children who have more conflict with their mothers during early years of elementary school may be at difficulty finding a sense of purpose in life during adulthood, suggests a new research.

A sense of purpose involves having the belief that one has a stable, far-reaching aim that organises and stimulates behaviour and goals to progress towards that objective.

The study showed children who clash with their mothers may struggle to find purpose as adults.

“One of the biggest takeaway messages from these findings is the path to a purposeful life starts early, well before we start to consider different goals for life,” said Patrick Hill, Associate Professor at Washington University in St. Louis.

“The research shows that it’s the child’s perspective of conflict that has the greatest effect on later sense of purpose and what matters most in this equation is the child’s relationship with his or her mother,” Hill said.

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Clashing with your mother can reduce purpose in life later: Study. Pixabay

For the study, researchers included 1,074 students (50 per cent female) and their parents, all of whom self-reported on levels of parent-child conflict in their families during grades 1-5.

The findings, published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, showed children who reported conflicted relations early in life with fathers predicted less life satisfaction in emerging adulthood.

But the negative impact on sense of purpose was not nearly as strong as it was found to be among children who reported early conflicts with mothers.

Also Read- E-cigarettes Found More Effective in Helping Smokers Quit: Study

Only the child’s perspective seemed to matter.

Understanding the content of conversations, including how are parents demonstrating the value of a purposeful life, or how are they helping children to define and pursue their own purposeful paths can help us all understand how conversations matter to children in our lives, said Leah Schultz, doctoral student at the varsity. (IANS)