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Nepal Earthquake: Man’s best buddy is making its contribution count

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Sniffer-dog-2-500

By NewsGram Staff Writer

No doubt, help is pouring over disaster-struck Nepal from every corner of the world. With pledges of money, water and food supplies, every country is doing its bit to offer relief to this land-locked country.

In fact, in this hour of crisis, human’s best buddy is also making its contribution count.

Notably, the canine mates possess special abilities to sniff and locate the remains of people who are stuck or buried beneath the rubble. Body structure of dogs allows them to climb high on the mountains, thus speeding up the rescue process.

Just a few hours after the powerful 7.9 earthquake jolted Nepal, India sent a pack of sniffer dogs to Kathmandu via an IAF craft to help with the rescue operations. The sniffer dogs were part of India’s first rescue deployment.

Just a day after the disastrous earthquake, a team of six Essex firefighters and rescue dog Darcy have joined the international operation to assist with the earthquake recovery operation.

Five dogs from Gilroy, United States, were also sent to Nepal to look for people who may be buried alive under tons of debris due to the deadly earthquake.

Pluis Davern, who trains the highly skilled dogs, said, “Those disaster search dogs are going to be incredibly helpful. They cover terrain that we as humans never can, and pinpoint where potentially people who are still alive are buried.”

These dogs have been trained to bark as soon as they sniff the scent of a living person.

“It’s electrifying, because there is a chance to save somebody who otherwise, potentially, would never be found,” he said.

A team of 15 volunteers and six dogs were sent to Nepal from France and Spain to lend a hand in the rescue operations.

“These dogs have a vital role in identifying victims buried under the debris,” said Jose Castello, a volunteer with Intervention Ayuda Emergencical (IAE).

Hitherto, nearly 5,000 people have been reported dead after a powerful 7.9-magnitude struck Nepal on last Saturday.

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Dogs can Perform Many Tricks for their Owners, but Best One might be Extending their Life

Kramer's team studied data on 3.8 million patients taken from 10 other studies conducted worldwide over more than 70 years

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Dogs, Tricks, Owners
FILE - A woman transports a Yorkshire Terrier dog in Erfurt, Germany, June 2, 2019. VOA

Dogs can perform many tricks for their owners, but the best one might be extending their life.

“Our analysis found having a dog is actually protective against dying of any cause,” said Dr. Caroline Kramer, lead author of a study published Tuesday in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association.

Kramer’s team studied data on 3.8 million patients taken from 10 other studies conducted worldwide over more than 70 years. They found a 24% reduction in the risk of death from all causes, and a 31% reduction of death due to cardiovascular problems.

“Having a dog was associated with increased physical exercise, lower blood pressure levels and better a cholesterol profile in previous reports,”she said.

Dogs, Tricks, Owners
“Our analysis found having a dog is actually protective against dying of any cause,” said Dr. Caroline Kramer, lead author of a study published Tuesday in Circulation. Pixabay

Another study also published Tuesday in the same journal found that dog owners living alone had a 33% better chance of surviving a heart attack than patients living alone without a dog. In stroke patients living alone, the chance of survival increased 27%.

That study was conducted in Sweden between 2001 and 2012 using the country’s National Patient Register.

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“We know that loneliness and social isolation are strong risk factors for premature death, and our hypothesis was that the company of a pet can alleviate that,” said the study’s author Tove Fall, an associate professor of epidemiology at Uppsala University in Sweden. (VOA)